» » The Power of Reading: Insights from the Research

Download The Power of Reading: Insights from the Research fb2

by Stephen D. Krashen
Download The Power of Reading: Insights from the Research fb2
Schools & Teaching
  • Author:
    Stephen D. Krashen
  • ISBN:
    1591582067
  • ISBN13:
    978-1591582069
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Libraries Unlimited (September 2004)
  • Pages:
    180 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Schools & Teaching
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1911 kb
  • ePUB format
    1987 kb
  • DJVU format
    1673 kb
  • Rating:
    4.8
  • Votes:
    448
  • Formats:
    txt mobi docx azw


2nd ed. p. cm. Includes index. ISBN 1-59158-169-9 1. Books and reading. 110 Light Reading: The Power of Magazines 113 Is Light Reading: Enough?

I highly recommend this book if you are looking for a different point of view from the more traditional approaches to reading. One person found this helpful.

Students will develop full literacy if they are exposed to reading in a natural manner, free from the constraints of skill-learning that often controls classroom learning. Full literacy means that readers develop properly reading comprehension skills, acquire large amounts of vocabulary, improve spelling, and develop writing styles. I highly recommend this book if you are looking for a different point of view from the more traditional approaches to reading.

Mobile version (beta). Download (pdf, 658 Kb) Donate Read. Epub FB2 mobi txt RTF. Converted file can differ from the original. If possible, download the file in its original format.

The power of reading. The power of reading. by. Stephen D. Krashen. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; ctlibrary; china; americana.

The Power of Reading book. In this timeless treatise, Krashen argues that free voluntary.

Download Citation On Jan 1, 2004, . To get from beginning to end requires more sustained commitment than dipping in and out of a newspaper or magazine (Moss & McDonald, 2004).

oceedings{Krashen1993ThePO, title {The Power of Reading.

FVR means time is set aside to allow young people to read what they want to read, even if it's comic books or romances.

His topic today: The Power of Reading. They have to do this first. In fact, it’s very hard to find anyone in this country who’s gone to our schools who’s completely and totally illiterate.

Online version: Krashen, Stephen D. Power of reading. Libraries Unlimited ; Portsmouth, NH : Heinemann, 2004 (OCoLC)676867950.

Tell the Publisher! I'd like to read this book on Kindle Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

Rexfire
Stephen Krashen's argument in this book is no different from his hypotheses on second language learning. Students will develop full literacy if they are exposed to reading in a natural manner, free from the constraints of skill-learning that often controls classroom learning. Full literacy means that readers develop properly reading comprehension skills, acquire large amounts of vocabulary, improve spelling, and develop writing styles. The research overwhelmingly supports the fact that when students are encouraged to read on their own, and when they read what they like (what Krashen calls Free Voluntary Reading or FVR) readers will benefit exponentially as opposed to the poor effects of direct instruction in the classroom. Although this idea is already popular among educators, Krashen's efforts at documenting the research is definitely appreciated by teachers and professionals in this field.

Beside proving that FVR has a strong impact on reading, Krashen discusses in detail and supports with research, the kind of literature that students like to read; examines how helpful this literature helps students in the different types of reading skills; and discusses ways in which schools can address the problem of accessing good reading materials. Krashen does not simplify his case by putting the blame on anyone specifically. He explores the socio-economic factors that impede learners from having access to books and recommends that schools should better equip their libraries with books that kids like to read, for example: comic books, teen romances, children books, mystery and scary books. He also discusses these genre to show why these types of texts benefit learners in becoming literate. He also calls for more money to build better libraries. He also makes a case that reading improves writing skills and develops writing styles, but he admits that not much research has been done on this area. Each section is also accompanied by the effects of FVR on second language learners.

Although I agree with Krashen on the FVR, his case against direct teaching is not as compelling as his arguments for FVR. His survey on research on the effects of direct teaching is sparse, and perhaps unfair. Without questioning the enormous benefits of reading on one's own, my own teaching experience shows me how essential direct teaching is as long as it is not limited to drills and pure questioning. I do believe that direct instruction improves significantly on reading comprehension. Other texts that provide research making a case for the importance of direct instruction are William Grabe's Reading in A Second Language and I.S.P.
Nation's Teaching ESL/EFL Reading and Writing. Although these texts address second language reading, they point out to the importance that direct instruction with proper strategies improves reading comprehension skills significantly. Many other texts on reading addressing meaningful strategies to read better also suggest that direct instruction has a great effect.

However, Krashen does make one compelling argument: that stressing too much on direct instruction will never compensate for the lack of reading environment that often surrounds the young lives of many poor families. This is a caveat to ask schools to place a greater emphasis on effective reading libraries and to support programs where kids may have access to books that would be attractive to them.

In spite of the above disagreement, this book is a must for anyone who wants to enrich the reading world for learners and for novices on research, who may find this book rich in research topics.
Niwield
Research based, engaging and informative. What every Reading professional knows- when given free choice, a child will read. Self-selection is the key to engaging readers.
Malakelv
I am the Library/Media Specialist for a school district in Alaska on a grant to increase literacy through literature. I heard Stephen D. Krashen speak at a school librarian convention and was so impressed that I read this book. The district has Silent Sustained Reading as its number one directive to all the teachers, but the idea is difficult for some teacher's to accept. I am hoping that by lending this book to teachers we can get fuller compliance. Having taught children's literature class at the college level for six years, I have read a lot and firmly believe in the work done by Krashen as presented in this book.
Amarin
I had to get this for grad school, so it wasn't a pleasure reading - but it was very informative.
Kabandis
I have been teaching 18 years and feel like this book hits the mark. The principles are so simple and make so much sense. We live in a world that complicates basic truths and unfortunately our school systems have adopted this mentality. The book has simplistic principles that work.
Mightsinger
The Power of Reading: Insights from the Research is a great book in that it lends a different outlook on reading fluency. The central theme of the book is to encourage reading by letting the reader read anything they want: comic books, newspapers, magazines, etc.... The author believes that as long as the reader is reading fluency will occur. I highly recommend this book if you are looking for a different point of view from the more traditional approaches to reading.
Celen
I wish more teachers would read this book. Students and parents would be so blessed if the concepts here were put into practice. Dr. Krashen has many of his books posted for free on his website, for free online reading or download at sdkrasen.com
As a middle school Language Arts teacher, I set aside 15 minutes every day for silent reading. That is a huge chunk of instructional time--especially in these test-driven days. Nevertheless, I have always believed that my students, who don't often make time to read outside of school, would benefit from having this designated time during school to practice their reading. Prof. Krashen's book spelled out specifics about how this type of reading can help students; it also gives my practice of having silent reading daily in my class the scientific proof that I wouldn't otherwise have.