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by John Caldwell Holt
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Schools & Teaching
  • Author:
    John Caldwell Holt
  • ISBN:
    0385291574
  • ISBN13:
    978-0385291576
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Delacorte Pr (February 1, 1972)
  • Subcategory:
    Schools & Teaching
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1461 kb
  • ePUB format
    1353 kb
  • DJVU format
    1778 kb
  • Rating:
    4.6
  • Votes:
    899
  • Formats:
    txt lit mbr doc


John Holt (1923-1985) writer, teacher, lecturer, and amateur musician, wrote ten books, including What Do I Do Monday?, How Children Learn, and How Children Fail.

John Holt (1923-1985) writer, teacher, lecturer, and amateur musician, wrote ten books, including What Do I Do Monday?, How Children Learn, and How Children Fail. For years a leading figure in school reform, John Holt became increasingly interested in how children learn outside of school.

What Do I Do Monday? book. This book is a rich harvest of possibilities. After teaching in private schools for many years John Caldwell Holt wrote his first two books, How Children Fail, and How Children Learn. It is an encouraging book, a book that says "there are so many things we can do. Some will seem easy, some will seem harder; do what feels possible to you, and then try something else.

John Caldwell Holt (April 14, 1923 – September 14, 1985) was an American author and educator, a proponent of homeschooling and, specifically, the unschooling approach, and a pioneer in youth rights theory. After a six-year stint teaching elementary school in the 1950s, Holt wrote the book How Children Fail (1964), which catalogued the problems he saw with the American school system. He followed it up with How Children Learn (1967)

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John Holt - Learning All the Time. Because of the way books are put together, I can't do that

John Holt - Learning All the Time. Because of the way books are put together, I can't do that. The most I can ask, and do ask, is that after you have read this first section of the book, you read it again, so that you will be able to see each part of it, each chapter, in the light of all the other chapters.

Discover Book Depository's huge selection of John Caldwell Holt books online. Free delivery worldwide on over 20 million titles. What Do I Do Monday? John Caldwell Holt.

Writing About John Holt Books written by John Holt Holt in Translation Articles by John Holt John Holt Audio Recordings . What Do I Do Monday? (Dutton, 1970, Heinemann, 1995. Currently out of print, 2013.

Writing About John Holt Books written by John Holt Holt in Translation Articles by John Holt John Holt Audio Recordings John Holt Photographs GWS Volume 1 How Children Fail by John Holt How Children Learn The Underachieving School Escape From Childhood What Do I Do Monday? .

by John Caldwell Holt. What do I do on Monday?" This book is a rich harvest of possibilities.


Connorise
Any and all of John Holt's books are to be treasured. Way back in the fifties I read them eagerly when my first son was in primary school! First I read "How Children Fail", then "How Children Learn" and others whose names I have not retained. They all deal with the kind of issues that made and make school learning hell or at least boring for really bright children, and they resonated with my soul and encouraged me to do better for my own son -- now nearly 60 and an amazing original and independent thinker leading a deeply satisfying life. For goodness sake, try it; you'll like it!!
Jaiarton
great book!
Kahavor
I have been hearing a lot about John Holt while trawling forums and websites about homeschooling, so I thought I might as well check him out. What Do I Do Monday? (Innovators in Education) is the first book that became available at my local library, so this is the one I read first. Holt soundly condemns methods used in public schools at the time (methods that have improved very little since then!) and I found myself agreeing with the majority of his opinions.

He doesn't just argue against these methods, though. He also provides some alternatives. This book is packed full of great ideas for helping (not making!) children to follow their natural learning inclinations. I particularly love the way he explained certain Maths concepts. Not being mathematically minded myself, this is perhaps the first time in my life that I have fully understood some of these concepts!

This book is a must-read for anyone embarking on the homeschool journey, but I also recommend it to parents, grandparents, teachers and anyone else who cares for the children in their life.
Fordregelv
The focus here is on creative approaches to learning (and I absolutely don't mean happy faces and cute cartoons) in the classroom, and I don't know of a better book in this line. Can be useful regardless of your teaching methods. Also offers Holt's theory of learning which is also persuasive and useful. Holt knew and loved children, and was incredibly intelligent in his approach. Get this book if you're a teacher--or a parent, because these ideas can stimulate the whole family.

Alan Nicoll
Mori
A wonderful book about teaching young children the basics; reading, writing and math. Where "How Children Learn" and "How Children Fail" developed a philosophy of education, this volumn details how Mr. Holt put his philosophy to work in the classroom. Full of descriptions of actual exercises you can try with kids, either in school or at home, that encourage learning without sacrificing creativity or future problem solving abilities. If you're looking for more theory on education, pass this one up for now. But if you're ready to apply some of the insights of a brilliant thinker and observer of children, read this book, and be prepared to take notes.
Kaim
I had heard great things about John Holt and was really disappointed in this book. Maybe part of it was that after reading about Charlotte Mason and reading books by John Gatto, it didn't seem so revolutionary to me. But Holt quoted psychologist Robert Liang extensively in this book, which to me seems like the most outdated psychobabble (granted this book was written quite awhile ago), saying if you make ____ mistake with your kids they may turn out schizophrenic!

He then continues on with different teaching techniques, which is also surprising since the unschooling movement generally refer to him as the source of their inspiration, but say you should not "teach" children, letting them learn as they become motivated to do so. So if you're looking for unschooling information you won't find it here. It also has odd references like to a school in which teachers express anger to the students to make things "real" and children seem to be allowed to hit each other sometimes.