» » Schooling as Violence: How Schools Harm Pupils and Societies

Download Schooling as Violence: How Schools Harm Pupils and Societies fb2

by Clive Harber
Download Schooling as Violence: How Schools Harm Pupils and Societies fb2
Schools & Teaching
  • Author:
    Clive Harber
  • ISBN:
    0415344336
  • ISBN13:
    978-0415344333
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Routledge; 1 edition (October 28, 2004)
  • Pages:
    168 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Schools & Teaching
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1998 kb
  • ePUB format
    1427 kb
  • DJVU format
    1827 kb
  • Rating:
    4.4
  • Votes:
    978
  • Formats:
    doc docx txt azw


book below: (C) 2016-2018 All rights are reserved by their owners.

Students, school staff or members of society who are intoxicated tend to lose control of their inhibitions and often . Another cause of school violence may be personality problems.

Students, school staff or members of society who are intoxicated tend to lose control of their inhibitions and often act in an irrational manner. Hence, the effect of drugs on the human body can serve as a catalyst for school violence. Shyness, for instance, may cause a student to feel out of place amongst his peers, thereby influencing him to be rebellious or try to get noticed by any means.

Results from Google Books.

Asking fundamental and often uncomfortable questions about the nature and purposes of formal education, this book explores the three main ways of looking at the relationship between formal education, individuals and society: that education improves society that education reproduces society exactly as it is that education makes society worse and harms individuals.

Taylor & Francis Ltd (Sales), Routledge.

Schooling as Violence: How Schools Harm Pupils and Societies. Schooling and violence in South Africa: Creating a safer school. The legacy of the brutality of apartheid in South Africa is a violent social context characterized by high levels of unemployment, extremes of wealth and poverty, continuing racism, the eas. More).

Clive Harber is Head of the School of Education at the University of Birmingham. Times Educational Supplement Book of the Week

Clive Harber is Head of the School of Education at the University of Birmingham. He has had a distinguished career in education and written very many papers, chapters and books in the field. Times Educational Supplement Book of the Week. For anyone interested in school systems, this book is essential reading. is stirring stuff for those who believe that the current mass-schooling system is fundamentally damaging to children's human rights.

Save up to 80% by choosing the eTextbook option for ISBN: 9781134287314, 1134287313. The print version of this textbook is ISBN: 9780415344333, 0415344336. Note that the availability of products for purchase is based on the country of your billing address. Some items may have regional restrictions for purchase. Canadian customers may purchase from our stores in Canada or the US. Canada.

Asking fundamental and often uncomfortable questions about the nature and purposes of formal education, this book explores the three main ways of looking at the relationship between formal education, individuals and society:

* that education improves society* that education reproduces society exactly as it is* that education makes society worse and harms individuals.

Whilst educational policy documents and much academic writing and research stresses the first function and occasionally make reference to the second, the third is largely played down or ignored.

In this unique and thought-provoking book, Clive Harber argues that while schooling can play a positive role, violence towards children originating in the schools system itself is common, systematic and widespread internationally and that schools play a significant role in encouraging violence in wider society. Topics covered include physical punishment, learning to hate others, sexual abuse, stress and anxiety, and the militarization of school. The book both provides detailed evidence of such forms of violence and sets out an analysis of schooling that explains why they occur. In contrast, the final chapter explores existing alternative forms of education which are aimed at the development of democracy and peace.

This book should be read by anyone involved in education - from students and academics to policy-makers and practitioners around the world.