» » Best of Ray Bradbury

Download Best of Ray Bradbury fb2

by Ray Bradbury
Download Best of Ray Bradbury fb2
Graphic Novels
  • Author:
    Ray Bradbury
  • ISBN:
    0743474767
  • ISBN13:
    978-0743474764
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    IBooks; First Edition edition (August 26, 2003)
  • Pages:
    160 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Graphic Novels
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1634 kb
  • ePUB format
    1873 kb
  • DJVU format
    1209 kb
  • Rating:
    4.8
  • Votes:
    204
  • Formats:
    rtf mobi lit azw


A book’s total score is based on multiple factors, including the number of people who have voted for it and how highly those voters ranked the book

A book’s total score is based on multiple factors, including the number of people who have voted for it and how highly those voters ranked the book.

Ray Bradbury’s internationally acclaimed novel Fahrenheit 451 is a masterwork of twentieth-century literature set in a bleak, dystopian future. Guy Montag is a fireman. In his world, where television rules and literature is on the brink of extinction, firemen start fires rather than put them out. His job is to destroy the most illegal of commodities, the printed book, along with the houses in which they are hidden. Montag never questions the destruction and ruin his actions produce, returning each day to his bland life and wife, Mildred, who spends all day with her television family.

List of the best Ray Bradbury books, ranked by voracious readers in the Ranker community

List of the best Ray Bradbury books, ranked by voracious readers in the Ranker community. With commercial success and critical acclaim, there's no doubt that Ray Bradbury is one of the most popular authors of the last 100 years. He is best known for his dystopian novel Fahrenheit. List of the best Ray Bradbury books, ranked by voracious readers in the Ranker community. He is best known for his dystopian novel Fahrenheit 451, for which he received a Prometheus Award in 1984.

Ray Douglas Bradbury (/ˈbrædˌbɛri/; August 22, 1920 – June 5, 2012) was an American author and screenwriter. He worked in a variety of genres, including fantasy, science fiction, horror, and mystery fiction.

SHADOW SHOW, All New Stories in Celebration of Ray Bradbury Ray Bradbury was a storyteller without peer, a poet of the possible, and, indisputably, one of America's most beloved authors

SHADOW SHOW, All New Stories in Celebration of Ray Bradbury Ray Bradbury was a storyteller without peer, a poet of the possible, and, indisputably, one of America's most beloved authors. In a much-celebrated literary career that spanned seven decades, he produced an astonishing body of work.

Ray Bradbury always satisfies and this collection is no exception to that rule!! .

Ray Bradbury always satisfies and this collection is no exception to that rule!! It just leaves you wanting more! Thank you so much!! . The book opens with a very nice one-page introduction from Bradbury, about falling in love with comics, abandoning them in the face of peer pressure, and then coming back to them even more committed. He also provides a paragraph intro to each story, telling how it came about, which is a nice bonus (although I would have liked to know what year each was written in).

See all books authored by Ray Bradbury, including Fahrenheit 451, and Something Wicked .

See all books authored by Ray Bradbury, including Fahrenheit 451, and Something Wicked This Way Comes, and more on ThriftBooks. Best known for his works Fahrenheit 451, The Illustrated Man, and The Martian Chronicles, Ray Bradbury is one of America's most highly regarded and successful novelists, short story writers, essayists, playwrights, and screenwriters. Also a poet, Ray Douglas Bradbury was born in Illinois in 1920 and raised in Los Angeles, where he ended his formal education by graduating from high school. Bradbury, who died in 2012, published more than thirty books, close to 600 short stories, and numerous poems, essays, and plays.

Ray Bradbury, the legendary science fiction writer who turned his childhood dreams and nightmares, a rejection from .

Ray Bradbury, the legendary science fiction writer who turned his childhood dreams and nightmares, a rejection from the military due to bad eyesight, and Cold War paranoia into a marvelous writing career spanning 74 years and including horror, science fiction, fantasy, humor, short stories, essays, plays, and more, has died at the age of 91. Bradbury was best known for his highly creative speculative fiction in which he imagined futures populated with telepathic Martians, book-burnings, and sea monsters in love.

Dandelion Wine by Ray Bradbury

Dandelion Wine by Ray Bradbury .The title refers to a wine made with dandelion petals and other ingredients, commonly citrus fruit. In an ingenious framework to open and close the book, Bradbury presents himself as a nameless narrator who meets the Illustrated Man-a wanderer whose entire body is a living canvas of exotic tattoos. What's even more remarkable, and increasingly disturbing, is that the illustrations are themselves magically alive, and each proceeds to unfold its own story.

Young Ray Bradbury, best Sci fi author in the history of ever. Ray Bradbury I loved his sci-fi novels as Martian Chronicles and Fahrenheit 451. a young ray bradbury. his short stories are my comfort reading

Young Ray Bradbury, best Sci fi author in the history of ever. his short stories are my comfort reading. he never grew cynical as an adult, or forgot how exciting the world is. he seemed to write with almost childish joy and vigour. It’s a very bad place for writers because the teachers always think they know more than you do-and they don’t. They have prejudices. Ray Bradbury, the Art of Fiction No. Writing About Writing (And Occasionally Some Writing) Ray Bradbury Potpourri

The best comics illustrators celebrate the world's most acclaimed author of the fantastic.

Mavivasa
Love Bradbury
Dikus
As a lover of both Ray Bradbury and graphic novels I was more than ecstatic to find this. It gives a nice breath of stories and a variety of different illustrators so I think there is at least something in there that everyone would like (and equally something that you probably won't care for). Short stories can be hard to pull off in comic form, but these seem to be done well and while they may not carry the omph of the original they do hold their own and the illustrations do add their own touch which is refreshing for those who are familiar with the stories.
Cointrius
Ray Bradbury always satisfies and this collection is no exception to that rule!! It just leaves you wanting more! Thank you so much!! Bradbury will always be my favorite!!
Hiclerlsi
I'm not a particularly huge Bradbury fan, although I am familiar with his most famous/popular work, and am aware of his vast influence on modern science-fiction. I am a fan of graphic storytelling though, and that led me to pick up this collection of graphic adaptations of twelve of his short stories (I have no idea why the publisher has chosen to give the book the subtitle, "The Graphic Novel", presumably to cash in on the current popularity of the so-called graphic novel). To add to the confusion, the selections here all previously appeared in the "Ray Bradbury Chronicles" comic-book series published by Topps. And just to make things totally muddy, some of those reprinted much older adaptations published as comics by EC! So, consider this a sort of best-of collection from the Topps series. Phew!

The book opens with a very nice one-page introduction from Bradbury, about falling in love with comics, abandoning them in the face of peer pressure, and then coming back to them even more committed. He also provides a paragraph intro to each story, telling how it came about, which is a nice bonus (although I would have liked to know what year each was written in). Not having read any of the original stories, I can't comment on how faithful these adaptations are -- although other reviewers say they are quite close. Similarly, those familiar with the story will probably get a richer experience from these visual versions.

"A Sound of Thunder" lays out the classic problem of time-travel -- the smallest impact you have on the past might have a dramatic consequence for the future. This is shown via a plotline involving prehistoric safaris to shoot dinosaurs (surely the developers of time travel could come up with a better business model?) and what happens when one such hunt goes awry. The art here is supplied by Richard Corben, whose strengths lie more in showing the natural world than people. The story was made into a pretty bad film a few years ago with the same title.

"The City" is a very dark and cool story about a city that is alive and waiting for humans to come back to it. The artwork is by Mike Mignola, who is one of my favorites. "Dark They Were, And Golden-Eyed" is another dark story, this one about Mars colonists who are stranded following a war on Earth. The artwork by Kent Williams and John Van Fleet is a little too arty and impressionistic for my taste. Van Fleet appears again in "Picasso Summer," about an American's summer vacation in Southern France and his obsession with Picasso. It' a cool piece, but I didn't care for the art that much.

"The Golden Apples of the Sun" is a kind of weird one about a spaceship on a journey to harvest a portion of the sun in order to save humanity (which strikes me as quite similar to the recent film "Sunshine"). The art by P. Craig Russell is nothing particularly interesting, sort of well-done generic comic-book stuff. Daniel Torres's art for "Night Meeting" is much cooler, as the material allows him to mix the machines and fashions of the 1950s with crazy organic Martian dwellings and forms. The premise is a kind of neat idea -- a human and Martian meet on Mars, but they're each in a different point in time -- but there's not much story to it. Mars features again in "The Visitor," in which sick men are sent to Mars to die with minimal comforts. When a Christ-like figure arrives and demonstrates his ability to conjure up immersive illusions to ease their final days, human nature at its worst takes hold. P. Craig Russell and Michael Lark combine to bring this to life with quite vivid work.

"A Piece of Wood" is a cool story about a soldier who has worked out how to rust all the weapons of war, unfortunately it's pretty static and doesn't really lend itself to a visual interpretation, leaving Mark Chiarello with not a lot to work with. On the flip side, "Come into My Cellar" is a classic 1950s cautionary tale, providing tons of iconic retro material for Dave Gibbons to work with. Basically, it involves alien mushrooms, and that's all you need to know! Less compelling plotwise, but totally different artwise, "It Burns Me Up" is a semi-crime story set ablaze by Harvey Korman and Matt Wagner's stunning and unique work. Their style is hard to describe and really works better as individual frames than it does at creating a flowing story. The last two tales, "The April Witch" (art by J. Muth) and "The Foghorn" (art by Wayne Barlowe) failed to do much for me from either a storytelling or artistic perspective.

Overall an interesting project, with maybe slightly more misses than hits. Definitely not the way to be introduced to Bradbury, but certainly something existing fans will want to check out.
SING
The Best of Ray Bradbury contains illustrated adaptations of some of Ray Bradbury's most famous stories. The text and the art unquestionably captures the essence of these classic science fiction tales from the 1960's. The language and clothing reflect the time period, and are not modernized. Reading it, I felt as if I was holding a yellowed paperback published in the 1970's. Definitely authentic.

The art for each story is unique. No artist's style is the same. Best of all, Bradbury (who is still alive and writing) has written a moving introduction to the book. The introduction really touched my heart. It has to do with following your dreams, and how he got his start in writing sci-fi. And as a delightful bonus, Bradbury has written brief introductions to each and every story in the book!
Agalas
Bradbury, more than most well known SF writers, put a human face on his tales of maybe-if and far-away.

Here, some of comics' best artists put faces on Bradbury's tales. On the whole, the matching of artist to story was brilliant. Jon J. Muth's watercolors illustrated an eerie, atmospheric experience within another mind. Harvey Kurtzman's geometric, brash figures walk through a noir murder mystery, narrated by the deceased. Richard Corben's piece opens the book, showing not a hero or has-been but a never-was, who screws up 65 million times over. P. Craig Russell's pictures give life to two stories, both that want the kind of majesty he puts into visual storytelling. All that, and lots more.

These are good comics - masterful artists rendering a master's storytelling. Good for anyone who like narrative comics or who likes Bradbury. I have the good fortune of being both.

//wiredweird
Fawrindhga
I love Ray Bradbury, and I love comics, so I was hoping that a combination of the two would be excellent. It wasn't. Don't get me wrong; I enjoyed this graphic novel. It just wasn't perfect. One of the major issues I had with it is that in several of the stories (most notably Dark They Were With Golden Eyes) the pictures and text had a tendency to run off the edge of the page, as though the page was not in quite the right position during the printing. Usually it was not more than a letter that was missing, and I had no trouble in determining what was meant to be said, but it was still annoying. There were also several typos in the brief intros to each story.
The art is wonderful, and fits each story very well. The writing, of course, is Bradbury and I don't think I need to say any more about that. Each story stays very true to the original, and I believe that every line of text is directly from the text of the story, which is nice. Of course, a lot is missing as well, but that's what the pictures are for.
I do think that it helps to have read the stories before reading this. There was one story that I was unfamiliar with, and I don't feel that I got quite as much out of that one as I would have liked. Familiarity with the stories definitely seemed helpful in my appreciation of the renditions of them in this graphic novel.
All in all, an interesting experiment that worked out fairly well. It's enjoyable, but I would recommend it mainly to Bradbury fans, as I don't think others will appreciate it as well.