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by Geoff Johns,Richard Donner,James Robinson
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Graphic Novels
  • Author:
    Geoff Johns,Richard Donner,James Robinson
  • ISBN:
    1401226345
  • ISBN13:
    978-1401226343
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    DC Comics (February 9, 2010)
  • Pages:
    224 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Graphic Novels
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1102 kb
  • ePUB format
    1819 kb
  • DJVU format
    1910 kb
  • Rating:
    4.5
  • Votes:
    615
  • Formats:
    rtf docx txt lit


Superman: Mon-El Vol 1 Paperback – February 15, 2011.

Superman: Mon-El Vol 1 Paperback – February 15, 2011. by. James Robinson (Author). Find all the books, read about the author, and more. I appreciate all the hoops author James Robinson had to jump through to make the story line logical, and don't mind at all that we're ignoring some potential plot holes, because he tells a darn good story. I like his version of Mon-El, even the weird fact that he sounds British with his Daxamite accent.

Geoff Johns gives an interesting story about the kryptonians and how much the . military doesn't trust them. Jimmy olsen, one of superman's biggest supporting characters gets the spotlight in the first two issues. If you are interested in a interesting superman story, check this one out.

Best-selling writers Geoff Johns (INFINITE CRISIS, GREEN LANTERN) and James Robinson (STARMAN, JSA: THE . After a devastating battle with the alien villain Brainiac, The Man of Steel learns that a piece of his home planet Krypton survived – the shrunken, bottled city of Kandor!

Best-selling writers Geoff Johns (INFINITE CRISIS, GREEN LANTERN) and James Robinson (STARMAN, JSA: THE GOLDEN AGE) unleash a massive storyline that changes Superman’s life forever! After a devastating battle with the alien villain Brainiac, The Man of . After a devastating battle with the alien villain Brainiac, The Man of Steel learns that a piece of his home planet Krypton survived – the shrunken, bottled city of Kandor!

He worked with Richard Donner for four years, leaving the company to pursue writing full-time

First thing I noticed: James Robinson is writing most of it and I like most of his stuff. Second: The story line is intriguing – Kandor, the Kryptonian city in a bottle captured by Brainiac, has been restored on Earth, right next to Superman’s Arctic Fortress of Solitude. He worked with Richard Donner for four years, leaving the company to pursue writing full-time. His first comics assignments led to a critically acclaimed five-year run on the The Flash.

Superman: Mon-El, Vol. 1. (Mon-El by. James Robinson, Renato Guedes (Illustrator). Jose Wilson Magalhaes (Illustrator). Joining in on the fun is Adventure Comics, by Geoff Johns and Francis Manapul. Starting with Superboy slowly becoming a part of everything, the series than evolves into telling the tale of how the time travelling Legion of Super Heroes are involved with this crisis. The book really portrays Mon-El's almost childlike exploration of Earth's cultures and really does a great job of endearing you to the character.

Geoffrey Johns (born January 25, 1973) is an American comic book writer, screenwriter and film and television producer

Geoffrey Johns (born January 25, 1973) is an American comic book writer, screenwriter and film and television producer. He served as the President and Chief Creative Officer (CCO) of DC Entertainment from 2016 to 2018 after his initial appointment as CCO in 2010. Some of his most notable work has used the DC Comics characters Green Lantern, Aquaman, Flash and Superman.

Writer: Geoff Johns, James Robinson, Richard Donner Artist: Renato Guedes, Jesus Merino, Pablo Raimondi .

Superman has left Earth. But after years of knowing nothing but the solitude of the Phantom Zone, how will Mon-El acclimate to society? And Guardian has his hands full with his new position in the Science Police.

Mon-El, Vol. 1: A New Krypton Collection. Luckily, Metropolis still has a few heroes, like Mon-El and the Guardian. by James Robinson · Richard Donner · Geoff Johns · Renato Guedes · Jose Wilson Magalhaes · Javier Pina · Pablo Raimondi · Jesús Merino · Eric Wight. Following the startling events of "New Krypton," Earth finds itself without its greatest protector - Superman! Luckily, Metropolis still has a few heroes, like Mon-El and the Guardian

Thank goodness, then, for Geoff Johns, the writer of the newly released Superman: New Krypton.

Thank goodness, then, for Geoff Johns, the writer of the newly released Superman: New Krypton. The story is a five-parter, with the first two chapters actually revolving around Jimmy Olsen (minor spoiler alerts ahead) as he uncovers a sinister plot to possibly eliminate Superman and every Kryptonian on the planet. Published on March 27, 2015.

Written by Richard Donner & Geoff Johns Art and cover by Adam Kubert

Written by Richard Donner & Geoff Johns Art and cover by Adam Kubert. A rocket lands in Metropolis containing a boy Superman thinks is from Krypton and kicks off a war between Superman, the DCU, the new Superman Revenge Squad and General Zod! Softcover, 160 pages, full color.

Following the startling events of "New Krypton," Earth finds itself without its greatest protector - Superman! Luckily, Metropolis still has a few heroes, like Mon-El and the Guardian. But after years of knowing nothing but the solitude of the Phantom Zone, how will Mon-El acclimate himself to society? And the recently returned Guardian has his hands full with his new position in the Science Police. How can they fill Superman's shoes? They'd better figure it out fast, because dangerous mysteries abound! The highly acclaimed writer-artist team of James Robinson (STARMAN, NEW KRYPTON) and Renato Guedes(SUPERMAN: UP, UP AND AWAY!) continue their run on SUPERMAN with or without The Man of Steel!

Dorintrius
Collects in this order
part of Action Comics Annual 10 - A slightly revised origin for Mon-El
Superman 684: When Parasite is released form the Phantom Zone, he drags out Mon-El as well (temporarily). Also, the Guardian (Jim Harper) becomes head of Metropolis' Science Police.
Action 874: Superman is not happy about the fact that Zod is now head of New Krypton's military guild. The Phantom Zone disintegrates and Superman is forced to release lead-poisoned Mon-El.

S 685 A "cure" is found for Mon-El. Superman decides to go to New Krypton "permanently," leaving Mon-El to watch over Metropolis.
S 686-689 At this point, Mon-El takes over the series, up until around issue 697 or so.
S 690 John Henry Irons (Steel) fights Atlas.
part of Superman Secret Files 2009: Encyclopedia entries for Mon-El, The Guardian, and a map of Metropolis

So, who is this Mon-El person, anyway? The character was created in 1961, when we learn he is from the planet Daxam. Under a yellow sun, Daxamites have essentially the same powers as Kryptonians, except that where Kryptonians are vulnerable to Kryptonite, Daxamites are vulnerable to lead. When he crash-lands in Smallville, home to young Clark Kent, he has amnesia. After seeing his powers and for various other reasons, Clark imagines he could be his older brother from Krypton, so he names him "Mon-El," since he landed on a Monday. Exposure to lead brings Mon-El's memories back, and fatally poisons him, so Clark sends Mon-El into the Phantom Zone to save his life. And then 1000 years later, Mon-El joins the Legion of Super-Heroes.

Every time Superman or the Legion gets rebooted, Mon-El's origin gets tweaked either a little or a lot. The above origin is pretty standard, but the next volume also has the history of Daxam, which has some interesting changes.

As with the rest of these New Krypton books, it's difficult for me to fully recommend them, due to the way the story wraps up in War of the Supermen. Question: since Superman got rebooted in 2011 but the Legion didn't, how did that effect Mon-El? Answer: heck if I know.
Conjulhala
Gosh, this New Krypton story goes on and on and on -- 15 volumes! "Mon-El" has so-so writing and largely regrettable pencils. The drawings of Pablo Raimondi and Javier Pina are especially poor -- juvenile and far-below what DC standards should be -- and the other artists are mediocre, though there is a typically-splendid cover by the unbeatable Alex Ross about a third of the way through this volume -- the best thing about the book. The stories mostly concern Mon-El filling-in for Superman while the latter is busy on New Krypton. It's not necessary to have this volume to follow the New Krypton storyline, but it helps. There are fifteen books in the Superman: New Krypton arc, but I've skipped the Supergirl and the Nightwing and Flamebird volumes, without losing track of the story.
If you wish to read them all, here's the order, according to the internet:
1) New Krypton V.1, 2) New Krypton V.2, 3) Mon-El (chapters 1-3), 4) New Krypton V.3, 5) Nightwing and Flamebird V.1, 6) Mon-El (chapters 4-end), 7) Mon-El Man of Valor (chapter 1), 8) Supergirl: Who is Superwoman?, 9) Supergirl:Death and the Family (beginning), 10) Superman: Codename Patriot, 11) Supergirl: Friends and Fugitives, 12) Mon-El Man of Valor (chapters 2 - penultimate), 13) Nightwing and Flamebird V.2, 14) Mon-El Man of Valor (final chapter), 15) Supergirl:Death and the Family (continue, to the end), 16) New Krypton V.4, 17) Last Stand of New Krypton V.1, 18) Last Stand of New Krypton V.2, 19) War of the Supermen
Jugore
Mon-El has always been one of those characters I've loved throughout my association with comics. I first read his "origin" story when I was a kid in an 80-page Giant, back when they had those for only $.25. You could read for hours. *sigh*

The problem with Mon-El, and it was a problem for a lot of writers, was that he was entirely too much like Superman (then, Superboy). He had the same powers and was at first believed to be another survivor from Krypton. Then he was given that whole weird weakness to lead and eventually placed into the Phantom Zone and eventually dropkicked into the future a 1000 years. Once there, he joined the Legion of Super-Heroes and became a core member. Off and on. Yep, there's been lots of problems with Mon-El.

Fortunately for Lar Gand (Mon-El's real name), the whole anti-Kryptonian feeling sweeping through the DC Universe at the moment has given him a second wind in today's world. I'm sure his future is still up there waiting for him, especially since the antidote that keeps him from dying of lead poisoning seems to be wearing off.

(Though that begs the question of why Mon-El doesn't jet off into space for some world that has the technology to reverse the poisoning or zip into the future for a quick fix. I like the time travel thing best, but it was kind of addressed when Superman was unable to access the future. However, I'm sure the timeline will be salvaged at some point, so why didn't the Legion jump back and...well, you see where the whole time travel thing kicks us in the butt, don't you?)

At any rate, with Superman voluntarily returning to New Krypton for a while to mediate there, someone needs to stand in as the new hero for Metropolis. Ta-dah! Mon-El. He even gets a new insignia to slap on his uniform - the Superman family shield, and a new identity as Clark's cousin Jonathan Kent.

I appreciate all the hoops author James Robinson had to jump through to make the story line logical, and don't mind at all that we're ignoring some potential plot holes, because he tells a darn good story. I like his version of Mon-El, even the weird fact that he sounds British with his Daxamite accent. I mean, who knew?

I also enjoy the team-up with the Guardian. Selecting the Guardian as the leader of Metropolis's Science Police, then as the mentor of Mon-El was genius. With all the new things Mon-El is having to learn, and the menace of the Parasite lurking in the background, Metropolis's newest superhero definitely needed someone to help him learn the ropes.

I liked Mon-El's tour of the world in an effort to get public opinion back on his side. Renato Guedes and Jose Wilson Hagalhaes's art gives the book a fresh face and gives us a new image of Mon-El. The panel breakdowns and action were well done.

Although Superman will soon be back in the pages of all his monthly comics, I'm enjoying the stand-ins as well as the plot developments regarding Mon-El and the other characters. This is a good chance to see Metropolis through other eyes, and with a basically neophyte hero that's familiar to most DC readers.