Download Drive fb2

by James Sallis
Download Drive fb2
Graphic Novels
  • Author:
    James Sallis
  • ISBN:
    0156030322
  • ISBN13:
    978-0156030328
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Mariner Books; First edition (September 5, 2006)
  • Pages:
    158 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Graphic Novels
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1866 kb
  • ePUB format
    1714 kb
  • DJVU format
    1711 kb
  • Rating:
    4.8
  • Votes:
    157
  • Formats:
    txt lrf mbr mobi


For me, the audio book was greatly hindered by James Sallis's writing style. DRIVEN doesn't have chapters, making it difficult to find a definitive change of perspective and/or place setting.

Driven is the sequel to Drive, now also an award-winning film  . For me, the audio book was greatly hindered by James Sallis's writing style. Narrator Paul Michael Garcia also didn't handle the different characters well making it hard to distinguish between who was who and what was dialog verse internal thought verses narrative.

James Sallis has published fourteen novels, multiple collections of short stories, poems and essays, the definitive biography of Chester Himes, three books of musicology, and a translation of Raymond Queneau's novel Saint Glinglin. The film of Drive won Best Director award at Cannes; the six Lew Griffin books are in development.

Set mostly in Arizona and . Drive is about a man who does stunt driving. Sallis, a serious writer, author of a biography of Chester Himes that's the gold standard on that underknown talent, delivers a happy surprise to the committed reader of darker books and more gritty crime fiction. He brings something fresh to something familiar. He abides by every convention of the genre he's chosen to work in and still gives a take on the tropes that's not hackneyed.

book-and-records store. Air would be thin up there for Urthship2, the new world’s natives hostile.

James Sallis Drive Chapter One Much later, as he sat with his back against an inside wall of a Motel 6 just north of Phoenix, watching the pool of blood lap toward him, Driver would wonder whether he had made a terrible mistake. Later still, of course, there’d be no doubt. Chapter One. Much later, as he sat with his back against an inside wall of a Motel 6 just north of Phoenix, watching the pool of blood lap toward him, Driver would wonder whether he had made a terrible mistake. book-and-records store.

Driven James Sallis ww. amesSallis. 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1.

James Sallis Drive Chapter One Chapter Two Chapter Three Chapter Four Chapter Five Chapter Six Chapter Seven Chapter Eight Chapter Nine Chapter Ten Chapter Eleven Chapter Twelve Chapter Thirteen Chapter Fourteen Chapter Fifteen Chapter Sixteen Chapter Seventeen Chapter.

James Sallis Drive Chapter One Chapter Two Chapter Three Chapter Four Chapter Five Chapter Six Chapter Seven Chapter Eight Chapter Nine Chapter Ten Chapter Eleven Chapter Twelve Chapter Thirteen Chapter Fourteen Chapter Fifteen Chapter Sixteen Chapter Seventeen Chapter Eighteen Chapter Nineteen Chapter Twenty Chapter Twenty-one Chapter Twenty-two Chapter Twenty-three Chapter Twenty-four Chapter Twenty-five Chapter Twenty-six Chapter. Twenty-seven Chapter Twenty-eight Chapter Twenty-nine Chapter Thirty Chapter Thirty-one Chapter Thirty-two Chapter Thirty-three Chapter Thirty-four.

PRAISE FOR DRIVE "Full throttle. Sallis' riveting novella reads the way a Tarantino or Soderbergh neo-noir plays, artfully weaving through Driver's haunted memory and fueled by confident storytelling and keen observations about moviemaking, low-life living, and, yes, driving. Short and not so sweet, Drive is one lean, mean, masterful machine. A. "- Entertainment Weekly "Imagine the heart of Jim Thompson beating in the poetic chest of James Sallis and you'll have some idea of the beauty, sadness and power of Drive.

James Sallis (born December 21, 1944 in Helena, Arkansas, United States) is an American crime writer, poet, critic, musicologist and musician, best known for his series of novels featuring the detective character Lew Griffin and set in New Orleans, . .

James Sallis (born December 21, 1944 in Helena, Arkansas, United States) is an American crime writer, poet, critic, musicologist and musician, best known for his series of novels featuring the detective character Lew Griffin and set in New Orleans, and for his 2005 novel Drive, which was adapted into a 2011 film of the same name. Sallis began writing science fiction for magazines in the late 1960s.

Kindness, like a boomerang, always returns. Cypress Grove (Turner, by James Sallis. The small town where Turner has moved is one of America's lost places, halfway between Memphis and forever. His life is mending as he and Val Bjorn grow closer. Moth (Lew Griffin, by James Sallis.

Much later, as he sat with his back against an inside wall of a Motel 6 just north of Phoenix, watching the pool of blood lap toward him, Driver would wonder whether he had made a terrible mistake. Later still, of course, there’d be no doubt. But for now Driver is, as they say, in the moment. And the moment includes this blood lapping toward him, the pressure of dawn’s late light at windows and door, traffic sounds from the interstate nearby, the sound of someone weeping in the next room . . . Thus begins Drive , the story of a man who works as a stunt driver by day and a getaway driver by night. He drives, that’s all—until he’s double-crossed. Powerful and stylistically brilliant, Drive has been hailed by critics as the "perfect piece of noir fiction" ( The New York Times Book Review ) and an instant classic.

Mr.Bean
I had trouble with this one.

For the first several chapters, 'Drive' really impressed me, with an engaging opening and florid characters and intelligent narrative. There was some great writing evident, and the story seemed promising; however, about a quarter of the way through, I started encountering some awkwardness in the text, such as disorienting shifts in time and perspective, and an over-brevity in the descriptions, which seemed to omit key details necessary to comprehend what exactly was happening. I found myself having to reread whole paragraphs, and sometimes whole pages; and, when this continued through the remainder of the book, I lost track of the plot developments and other elements, eventually to the point of disrupting all sense of transport in my mind. By the time I reached the ending, it meant nothing to me.

Granted, this all might've just been me and my personal reading style or thought processes or something, rather than inherent flaws in the book; but, in any case, my enjoyment was considerably reduced. That said, 'Drive' is not without merit, and I did still get something from it, ultimately. Even if it reads as strangely as I perceived it, I could see the book appealing to most any fan of fast-paced crime fiction.

My thanks goes out to this book's author and publisher. I am grateful for your work.

* * *

Some notable quotes from 'Drive':

"I was going to be the next great American writer. [...] Then my fist novel came out and gave credence to the Flat Earth folk -- fell right off the edge of the world." -- p.59

"Doc raised a hand to point shakily to the IVs. 'See I've reached the magic number.' 'What?' 'Back in med school we always said you have six chest tubes, six IVs, it's all over. You got to that point, all the rest's just dancing." -- p.129
skriper
I've been thinking about this book a bit lately and I've put off reviewing the book for a week because I wanted some time to collect my thoughts. First of all, most people who know me know how much I love the old hard-boiled and noir novels. But modern noir has been a little off putting for me simply because I never feel they can get the tone and style right and for the most part, they don't. Now when I think of James Sallis' Drive, I don't think this at all. To put it simply, I love and adore the way he went about writing this book.

Drive tells the story of a man simply known throughout the book as Driver; a stunt driver for Hollywood and a getaway driver on the side. This book is so non-linear that I do worry if I tell more about the story I might be giving away something that should be discovered by reading this book. This is a short novel that is jammed pack full of a fantastic noir story that could hold its own against Noir greats like The Postman Always Rings Twice or The Killer Inside Me.

There was so much to like about this book but there were also some things that really bugged me as well. Driver is a mysterious protagonist but I felt he talked far too much for something that would have been more suited as the strong silent type. I'm not sure if he was supposed to be written that way but for me, the impression I received from the character and whenever he spoke, didn't seem to fit my image of him. There has been a recent movie made about this book and I'm keen to see it but I have a feeling there will be a huge difference between the book and movie. I can see a linear story (which I'm ok with) but I can also see them doing the Hollywood thing and try to make a romantic connection between Driver and one of the women from this book. All in all, this book is well worth reading and I'm looking forward to reading the sequel Driven.(less)
Ericaz
This is a solid noir. It doesn't rely on provocative, and corny, descriptions of the women. Instead it focuses on creating a strong story that brings the reader in. In fact, it demands attention.
One thing to be prapared for is that the story can get very confusing at times. It flashes back and forth through time and there are some chapters where it will take a moment to readjust perspective and realize who, where, and what is taking place.
This isn't the Driver of the movie either. This Driver is in fact somewhat more human than the movie version.
I only gave the book a shot because I fell in love with the movie, but the book has found its own special place in my heart for its own qualities.
Bremar
I'm in no way, shape or form an author nor an expert reader, but this book...
Let me be honest, I saw the movie first, ok?
That's the first thing I'll say.
What you saw in the film is not what you'll get in this book.

Now, let me be a little rude, I feel like I just wasted my weekend on this book, I knew that this book would be nothing like the movie, I didn't go in expecting to be blown away. I expected at least something that might entertain. What I got, do you want to know what I got? A wasted weekend.

Buy the book or not, I don't care, but understand this, I warned you.

Why 2 stars? Because this book inspired one of the best movies to come out of the 2000's so far and doesn't deserve a 1 star for that reason alone.