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by Gary Groth,Leslie Stein
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Graphic Novels
  • Author:
    Gary Groth,Leslie Stein
  • ISBN:
    1606994131
  • ISBN13:
    978-1606994139
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Fantagraphics Books (May 17, 2011)
  • Pages:
    128 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Graphic Novels
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1749 kb
  • ePUB format
    1198 kb
  • DJVU format
    1434 kb
  • Rating:
    4.2
  • Votes:
    386
  • Formats:
    docx mobi txt azw


Cartoonist Leslie Stein spoke with CBR News about 'The Eye of the Majestic Creature,' her surreal .

Cartoonist Leslie Stein spoke with CBR News about 'The Eye of the Majestic Creature,' her surreal, autobiographical graphic novel which has just been published by Fantagraphics. With a meandering tone and structure reminiscent of Eddie Campbell's Alec stories, Stein depicts a relatable (but not necessarily realistic) slice of life tale, and the fact that the stranger, more colorful elements of her story - from a female protagonist named Larrybear to anthropomorphic musical instruments to characters drawn as animals - never overwhelm the realistic elements.

This is my third Leslie Stein book. The first was a diary comic, Bright-Eyed at Midnight. The second, Present, had more of a story in ita more ambitious story with art she names abstract, with faceless characters. This one, Eye of the Majestic Creature, which makes nothing but comic sense as a title, is a series of somewhat surreal and what would seem to be l comics from a twenty-something woman who depicts herself with creepy wide Coraline eyes ("Eye" of the majestic This is my third Leslie Stein book.

Everything with the topic 'Eye Of The Majestic Creature' on VICE. Leslie Stein is a master at revealing the true nature of the human soul while seemingly highlighting the mundane aspects of being alive. In this true-life adventure, Leslie is awakened by a drunken lost soul who she takes in and cares for. Leslie Stein.

Praise for Leslie Stein: Leslie Stein’s comics inhabit a charming and l (in the most . Early in the 21st Century a beautiful cartoonist, Leslie Stein, pretended to be a funky dweeb and spent considerable time counting sand. Catch my drift? - Gary Panter.

Praise for Leslie Stein: Leslie Stein’s comics inhabit a charming and l (in the most ‘semi’ sense of the word) yet surreal, insular world where her best friend and closest confidant is an acoustic guitar. What’s not to relate to? - Peter Bagge Early in the 20th Century, a beautiful cartoonist, Marcel Duchamp, pretended to be a marginally attractive woman and spent considerable time watching dust accumulate. Visual inventiveness combined with a high level of wit.

1 volume (unpaged) : 29 cm. "Eye of the Majestic Creature is a collection of l and fantasy-based comics that combine dry humor, psychedelia. "Eye of the Majestic Creature is a collection of l and fantasy-based comics that combine dry humor, psychedelia, and emotion to show the viewpoint of one person's world internally and externally. The story follows a young girl, Larrybear, and her talking acoustic guitar Marshmallow on their adventures through the countryside, Chicago, San Francisco and New York.

How did you find the experience? Was it a necessary part of your growth as a comics creator?

Eye of the Majestic Creature's creator talks musical/artistic influences that abound in creator's ife opus. May 05, 2011 By Jeremy Nisen Photography by David Black Web Exclusive. Leslie Stein: I loved comics when I was a kid, and I think I pretty much started drawing them as soon as I could read them. The earliest ones that I've seen were collaborations with my brother, where I would draw most of it and he would draw the punchline panel. Weirdly, the characters in those looked totally Amish. How did you find the experience? Was it a necessary part of your growth as a comics creator?

Great Michael DeForge tribute to Leslie Stein. Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week - June 2013.

Great Michael DeForge tribute to Leslie Stein. fantagraphics: kingtrash: eye of the majestic creature fan art Great Michael DeForge tribute to Leslie Stein Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week - June 2013. Nothing Keeps Us Awake at Night : We Are Büro Büro Answers the Eye on Design Questionnaire.

This book isn't easy to describe, and that's exactly why I love it. Leslie's surreal, funny style is a welcome addition to comics; her world includes a talking guitar and thrift-shop treasures. Though sometimes it's a compliment for me to say I read a book in one sitting, I'll be honest and say this one took me weeks —and that's because my eyes lingered over the detailed panels for perhaps much longer than the author intended. I envy her worldview, though I'm thrilled to have 128 pages of i. – - USA Today.

Groth, Eye of the Majestic Creature by Leslie Stein 30 pm-5:30 pm Paul Hornschemeier, Leslie Stein Sunday, April 10th 11:30 am-12.

Groth, Eye of the Majestic Creature by Leslie Stein. Secondly, check out our jam-packed schedule of awesome authors who will be signing at the Fantagraphics table over the weekend. 30 pm-5:30 pm Paul Hornschemeier, Leslie Stein Sunday, April 10th 11:30 am-12:30 pm Derek Van Gieson, Sara Edward-Corbett 12:30 pm-1:30 pm Kim Deitch, Gahan Wilson 1:30 pm-2:30 pm Leslie Stein, Michael Kupperman, John Kerschbaum 2:30 pm-3:30 pm Drew Friedman, Peter Bagge 3:30 pm-4:30 pm.

Eye of the Majestic Creature is a collection of semi-autobiographical and fantasy-based comics that combine dry humor, psychedelia, and emotion to show the viewpoint of one person’s world internally and externally. The story follows a young girl, Larrybear, and her talking acoustic guitar Marshmallow on their adventures through the countryside, Chicago, San Francisco and New York. While Larrybear struggles to connect with strangers, her friends, and her family with varying degrees of success, her growing population of anthropomorphic friends go on adventures of their own. Larrybear is in a constant struggle between the desire to connect with those around her and to be left to her own devices. You get a glimpse of her past life when she visits her home town of Chicago, trying to relate to old friends who have not matured since high school, as well as her family (which includes her hippopotamus father and his harem of ex-wives, two brothers, and Salsa-dancing mom). In the present, she moves to New York to find work for a time, resulting in many hilarious and drunken adventures with her new coworkers at a cell phone decorating shop, and her old friend Boris, who shares with her his P.G. Wodehouse books, as well as his “Incredible Hulk” weed. Drawn in shades of gray using the near-deceased practice of stippling, Stein’s imagery draws you into Stein’s world for a complete and engrossing experience.

Geny
I love the visual style. I love the characters. But I found that it severely lacked plot. Graphic novels (or any novels for that matter) can't be made on quirky characters, wise observations and lowkey mishaps. At least I don't smoke enough weed for it to work for me. So while I was enchanted with Larry and Marshmallow, I was often wondering why I was reading this. Sometimes my own days were more interesting than stuff in these comics. Also, there was something unsettling about how Stein portrays Asian characters. They're oddly drawn to look like victims of plastic surgery gone awry, too cutesy quirky kawaii in their acting, almost interchangeable, and never there for long enough not to be a pun. I know that Stein's style is overall weird, but that was different.
Gogul
Leslie Stein is a detached observer. The problem is that her detachment is in a constant battle between itself and Stein's own overarching empathetic nature. In her comic Eye of the Majestic Creature, Stein wanders and stumbles through experiences. She notes them coolly with a seemingly flat affect, but the next moment? Well, that belies her heart.

If you have never read any of Leslie Stein's Eye of the Majestic Creature then you should do so.

Right now.

I'll wait...

The reason I'm talking about this is that Fantagraphics has just published the latest volume of Stein's work, Eye of the Majestic Creature Volume 2. This collection continues the story of Stein's semi-autobiographical and wildly wonderful alter-ego, Larrybear. Larry has moved back to the city in this volume and it is this experience that makes up the first third of this book. Larry echoes Stein's dichotomous nature and the character's story chronicles that war between head and heart with humor, intelligence, and profundity. What Stein does in this first part of the book is to draw parallels between Larry's world and the world of Theodore Dreiser's masterpiece of American Naturalism, Sister Carrie. In Stein's conception of the modern world, little has changed in a young urban woman's experience from the turn of the twentieth century to the turn of the twenty-first.

The second part of Eye of the Majestic Creature Volume 2 focuses on incidents in her character's past. These include when her mother brought a drifter along on a family trip to Disney World, hanging out during her mother's AA meetings, and being a kid in a band with people much older than she. Once again, the stories are told with Stein's detachment. She records the events without seeming to comment on them, and yet her choices in narration and perspective have their own emotional heft. Larrybear lives through each moment as it occurs, and she neither comments on them nor seems to engage them through any sense-making efforts. Yet through this, Stein pushes the reader to feel in order to understand. It's subtle, and in this subtly great power lies.

The final act of Eye of the Majestic Creature Volume 2 follows Larry as she takes a trip to meet her friend Poppin's father. Poppin's head is a flower, though his father's head is human, but this doesn't seem to be an issue for anyone in this book. Then again, Larry's best friend is a talking, heavy-drinking guitar named Marshmallow. This final section of Eye of the Majestic Creature Volume 2 is my favorite part of the book for its all-too-humanness, especially in the midst of the strange scenario of Poppin's relationship with his dying father. Once again, Stein doesn't force anything. She lets it unfold with a casual sweetness, even in the midst of death and drunkenness and dysfunction. The story ends with the onset of change for Larrybear bred out of discontent and self-realization. The last panel in the book alone could be the subject of thousand word critique.

It also features a Booji Boy mask which brought back all sorts of memories for me - another moment of quiet connection, the kind of which this volume is full.

Leslie Stein is a voice for a certain aspect of her generation, the ones you see feigning ironic detachment while inside they are either all honest excitement or vast empathy. While it's just so much easier and cooler not to get emotionally involved, for people like Stein, that's just really not possible.

She's also in a pretty awesome band: Prince Rupert's Drops
Amerikan_Volga
I read this in one sitting really enjoying the world of Larrybear and company. What lifts it above the everyday story of a gal in a rut is the unique point of view the writer brings to all the characters making them flesh out and come alive. A fun read! I look forward to more books from L. Stein and all female Graphic Novelists!