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Download Batman Chronicles Vol. 7 fb2

by Bob Kane,Bill Finger
Download Batman Chronicles Vol. 7 fb2
Graphic Novels
  • Author:
    Bob Kane,Bill Finger
  • ISBN:
    1401221343
  • ISBN13:
    978-1401221348
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    DC Comics; 9th, 10th, 11th and 12th edition (March 24, 2009)
  • Pages:
    192 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Graphic Novels
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1933 kb
  • ePUB format
    1502 kb
  • DJVU format
    1626 kb
  • Rating:
    4.4
  • Votes:
    506
  • Formats:
    lrf lrf azw docx


Batman Chronicles Vol. 7 Paperback – March 24, 2009. Still with five stories from classic Batman villains from the 1940s that are mostly very good, Volume 7 of the Batman Chronicles is one of the better trades in this series.

Batman Chronicles Vol. by. Bill Finger (Author). Find all the books, read about the author, and more. Are you an author? Learn about Author Central. Bill Finger (Author), Bob Kane (Illustrator). Book 7 of 11 in the Batman Chronicles Vol 2 Series.

The Batman Chronicles, Vol. 7 book. In later years, Kane acknowledged Finger as "a contributing force" in the character's creation. This book collects Batman stories from Detective Comics and Batman and If you're looking for Batman facing foes has to this day, this is really a book for you. We get the first two two face stories in Issues 66 and 68. There's a lot about the character that's the same as today, yet because of the children's audience, these book were written for, some of the psychology is exaggerated or played weirdly.

The Batman Chronicles Vol. 7. Collects. Detective Comics 66-70, World’s Finest Comics 7 and Batman 12-13. The Golden Age. Genre. DC: Golden Age. DC: Main Continuity.

Milton Finger, known professionally as Bill Finger (February 8, 1914 – January 18, 1974), was an American comic strip and comic book writer best known as the co-creator, with Bob Kane, of the DC Comics character Batman, and the co-architect of the s. .

Milton Finger, known professionally as Bill Finger (February 8, 1914 – January 18, 1974), was an American comic strip and comic book writer best known as the co-creator, with Bob Kane, of the DC Comics character Batman, and the co-architect of the series' development.

Halesowen Chronicle Newspaper Grenfell Support News Newspaper Kidderminster Chronicle . Bill's last name is Finger. Comic book rar. Uplevel BACK.

Bill's last name is Finger.

This seventh paperback reprints stories from Detective Comics, Batman, and World's Finest Comics, from August to December, 1942. This paperback collects stories from the following comic books: Detective Comics (The Crimes of Two-Face). Batman (Brothers In Crime; The Wizard of Words; They Thrill To Conquer; and Around the Clock With the Batman). Detective Comics (Crime's Early Bird). The chronological reprinting of every Batman story continues with this new set of tales from the 1940s in which Batman and Robin meet Two- Face for the first time! Collecting BATMAN plus stories from DETECTIVE COMICS and WORLD'S FINEST COMICS #7. Release Date: 2009-03-24. Publisher(s): DC Comics. Timeline(s): DC Comics, DC: Batman, DC: Golden Age, DC: Main Continuity, DC: Pre-Crisis.

The graphic novel series collecting every Batman adventure ever published in chronological order continues with this new, seventh volume featuring stories from the early 1940s!In this new volume, Batman and Robin battle foes including The Joker and The Penguin, and face Two-Face for the very first time!

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Mustard Forgotten
This book collects Batman stories from Detective Comics #66-#70 and Batman #12 and #13.

If you're looking for Batman facing foes has to this day, this is really a book for you. We get the first two two face stories in Issues 66 and 68. There's a lot about the character that's the same as today, yet because of the children's audience, these book were written for, some of the psychology is exaggerated or played weirdly. Still, it's a fun look at how this character came to be.

By this time, it seems the writers knew that when they did four Batman stories in an issue of Batman, one had better be about the Joker. He's in both issues of Batman and also in Detective Comics. This portrayal of the Joker is a puzzler. His MO is that he pulls an outrageous crime that on the surface looks like he's nuts...like actually "painting the town red," or stealing a kid's report card so he'll cry, or giving people items that are useless like a clock with only one hand. In each case, there's something far more devious behind it. These are fun stories.

The Penguin also appears in Detective Comics #67 and we're given an energetic and vibrant story.

As for the rest of the book? We're given some interesting stories. There's a mystery on the train, to there's a few morality tales involving non-super criminals, and then there's a goofy one where A guy regains his memory of being a crime boss by being hit with a stone and so decides to get revenge by using things that have stone in their name for his revenge. It's goofy but enjoyably so.

The ones that didn't work are, "Batman Takes a Lone Hand," where Batman convinces Robin that they're quits and we get a somewhat dumb story. And the final story with a mentalist who gets real mindreading powers has a few flaws and is a bit below the standards of the rest book.

Still with five stories from classic Batman villains from the 1940s that are mostly very good, Volume 7 of the Batman Chronicles is one of the better trades in this series.
Ka
If you're in the mood for a silly Batman the early 1940's should be right up your alley. You just cannot take any of these stories the least bit serious. In one absurd example Batman and Robin are fighting a gang of thieves in the arctic. In order to attack the villains, Robin rolls down a hill collecting snow until he becomes an enormous human snowball plowing into the criminals. In another story a criminal attempts to escape in a plane prompting Robin to fire The Dark Knight at the plane using a huge cannon knowing full well if he misses he's dead. Batman snags the plane and pulls himself inside to battle the thief. Meanwhile a stuntman who's spent the whole story fearing for his life attempts to redeem himself by having Robin fly the Batplane above the plane Batman is on so that he can do a parachute free suicide dive at the plane. He misses but is saved when Batman reaches out and grabs the freefalling stuntman. The whole sequence is so divorced from reality it's hilarious but that's Batman of the 40's.

This is the era when Batman would punctuate each punch with a bad pun and the criminals often leave clues so obvious that they would insult the modern day "World's Greatest Detective". In one story a crook drops a newspaper clipping indicating their next crime. In another, two thugs openly brag in public that they managed to capture The Batman only to have their conversation overheard by Dick Grayson who just happens to be walking by at the moment. In fact Batman and Robin succeed as much from luck as skill. This has to be the wimpiest Batman of all time with fighting skills that seem about on par with say two decent fighters. Add a third and Batman's going down. Luckily for The Batman the villains consistently put the Dark Knight in easily escapable situations. In one story a villain bonks a sleeping Batman on the head and is told by his superiors to leave his unconscious body stranded in the Arctic rather than kill him because.... why??? This happens over and over again.

My favorite insane criminal scheme was put together by The Penguin. He taught a parrot to memorize safe combinations. The Penguins plan was predicated on someone with a safe full of valuables buying the parrot from him. Then the victim must keep the bird in the same room with the safe and the victim must recite the safe combination out loud for the bird to hear and finally the bird owner would need to call the Penguin to do a checkup of the parrot at which point the parrot will relay to him the safe combination. Astoundingly the plan works perfectly but The Penguin then goes ahead and just kills the man anyway before breaking into the safe.

I happen to be a huge fan of the lighthearted stories of 1950's but these older stories don't really have the charm and wit of those later stories and the art is muddy and inconsistent. About the only aspect of these stories that stands out as a positive is the usage of Robin who is a very useful member of the team and rescues Batman on more than one occasion. The reason I pick these Chronicles up is because they are part of comic book history particularly the foundation of characters that have become world famous. In this volume we get the first two Two-Face stories (originally named Harvey Kent), three Joker stories and a Penguin story. I'm going to give this book four stars NOT because the material here is four star material but because DC should be applauded rather than condemned for making these golden age stories available at a reasonable price.
CrazyDemon
The "Cronicles" series of volumes, with stories in order and in color are a great low-cost way to collect the old DC characters' publications from the 30s, 40s, and 50s - future releases presumed.