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by Daisetz Teitaro Suzuki
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Theology
  • Author:
    Daisetz Teitaro Suzuki
  • ISBN:
    0041490533
  • ISBN13:
    978-0041490534
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    HarperCollins; Second Edition edition (April 1, 1989)
  • Pages:
    160 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Theology
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1753 kb
  • ePUB format
    1921 kb
  • DJVU format
    1262 kb
  • Rating:
    4.7
  • Votes:
    345
  • Formats:
    txt mobi lrf docx


Daisetz Teitaro Suzuki (Suzuki Daisetsu, October 18, 1870 - July 22, 1966) was a famous Japanese author of books and essays on Buddhism, Zen and Shin that were instrumental in spreading interest in both Zen and Shin (and Far Eastern philosophy in general) to the West

Daisetz Teitaro Suzuki (Suzuki Daisetsu, October 18, 1870 - July 22, 1966) was a famous Japanese author of books and essays on Buddhism, Zen and Shin that were instrumental in spreading interest in both Zen and Shin (and Far Eastern philosophy in general) to the West. Suzuki was also a prolific translator of Chinese, Japanese, and Sanskrit literature. T. Suzuki was born Teitara Suzuki in Honda-machi, Kanazawa, Ishikawa Prefecture, the fourth son of physician Ryojun Suzuki.

Suzuki's first books in English were a translation of Ashvaghosha's Discourse on the Awakening of Faith in the Mahayana (1900) . Mysticism, Christian and Buddhist World perspectives (Том 12). Автор. Daisetz Teitaro Suzuki. Издание: перепечатанное.

Suzuki's first books in English were a translation of Ashvaghosha's Discourse on the Awakening of Faith in the Mahayana (1900) and Outlines of Mahayana Buddhism (1907). In the early part of the twentieth century, Suzuki devoted himself to the propagation of Zen via his writings.

Mysticism: Christian and Buddhist is a book that challenges and inspires; it will benefit readers of all religions who seek to. .Daisetz Teitaro Suzuki (1870-1966).

Mysticism: Christian and Buddhist is a book that challenges and inspires; it will benefit readers of all religions who seek to understand something of the nature of spiritual life. Библиографические данные. Mysticism: Christian and Buddhist Routledge Classics.

Mysticism, Christian and Buddhist - Daisetz Teitaro Suzuki. Buddhism thus may be considered more scientific and rational than Christianity which is heavily laden with all sorts of mythological paraphernalia

Mysticism, Christian and Buddhist - Daisetz Teitaro Suzuki. Buddhism thus may be considered more scientific and rational than Christianity which is heavily laden with all sorts of mythological paraphernalia. The movement is now therefore going on among Christians to denude the religion of this unnecessary historical appendix.

This book has no pretension to be a thorough, systematic study of the subject. Books related to Mysticism, Christian and Buddhist. It is more or less a collection of studies the author has written from time to time in the course of his readings, especially of Meister Eckhart as representative of Christian mysticism. For Eckhart's thoughts come most closely to those of Zen and Shin. Zen and Shin superficially differ: one is known as Jiriki, the "self-power" school, while the other is Tariki, the "other-power" school.

Daisetsu Teitaro Suzuki (鈴木 大拙 貞太郎 Suzuki Daisetsu Teitarō; he rendered his name "Daisetz" in 1894; 18 October 1870 – 12 July 1966) was a Japanese author of books and essays on Buddhism, Zen (Chan) and Shin that were instrumental in spreadi.

Daisetsu Teitaro Suzuki (鈴木 大拙 貞太郎 Suzuki Daisetsu Teitarō; he rendered his name "Daisetz" in 1894; 18 October 1870 – 12 July 1966) was a Japanese author of books and essays on Buddhism, Zen (Chan) and Shin that were instrumental in spreading interest in both Zen and Shin (and Far Eastern philosophy in general) to the West. Suzuki was also a prolific translator of Chinese, Japanese, and Sanskrit literature

Home Browse Books Book details, Mysticism: Christian and Buddhist. This book has no pretension to be a thorough, systematic study of the subject

Home Browse Books Book details, Mysticism: Christian and Buddhist. Mysticism: Christian and Buddhist. By Daisetz Teitaro Suzuki. This book has no pretension to be a thorough, systematic study of the subject.

Mysticism: Christian and Buddhist by Daisetz Teitaro Suzuki

Mysticism: Christian and Buddhist by Daisetz Teitaro Suzuki. Meister Eckhart and Buddhism The Basis Of Buddhist Philosophy "A Little Point" And Satori Living In The Light Of Eternity APPENDICES TO PART 1 Transmigration Crucifixion And Enlightenment SECTION TWO Kono-mama ("I Am That I Am") APPENDICES TO PART 2 Notes On "Namu-Amida-Butsu" Rennyo's Letters From Saichi's Journals.

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Book by Suzuki, Daisetz T.

nadness
"if we did not appeal to language there is no way to make others acquainted with the absolute; therefore language is resorted to in order to serve as a wedge in getting the one already in use; it is like a poisonous medicine to counteract another. It is a most dangerous weapon and its user has to be cautioned in every way not to hurt himself."

"It is we ourselves who, ignorant of its proper functions, try to apply it to that for which it was never intended. More than this, we make fools of ourselves by denying the reality of a transcendental world."

"This is the reason why Zen Buddhism strives to avoid the use of language and quite frequently denounces our shortsightedness in this respect."

"Language is a useful means of communication and expressions but when we try to use it for the deepest experience man can have we trap ourselves and do not know how to extricate ourselves. Eckhart is troubled in the same way..."
Fog
I found this to be a really interesting book. I like most everything that Suzuki wrote. Meister Eckhart is the primary Christian quoted by Suzuki, and his mysticism is quite similar to that espoused by Zen Buddhists. Suzuki was one of the first to point out that all mystical traditions point to the same unitive reality, and this book focuses specifically on what these similarities consist in. His finest work is probably The Zen Theory of No-Mind, followed by Zen and Japanese Culture. Suzuki was the true pioneer who introduced Western readers to Zen, and much that he said is still quite original and penetrating.
Arlelond
I believe that you are able to come to a clearer understanding of mysticism when D.T Suzuki compares Christian and Buddhist mysticism. You find that there are many more similarities than differences between these two philosophies. I believe the central theme uniting both these philosophies is that there is only one "Reality". Meister Eckhart, the great Christian Mystic, states that there is an "Absolute" which he calls the "Absolute Nothingness". In contrast, "God", "relativity", is "something". This is expressed in Buddhist terms as "Trisna", the basis of all existence. Trisna is even before existence and is not yet a "what". Trisna can be called the pure will. Trisna with a small t may be described as "nature" or the manifestation of "Trisna".
In section II of the book under Appendices-section VIII,IX,X, the book becomes somewhat difficult to understand as proper defintions are not provided for Buddhist terms; however, notwithstanding the foregoing, the author gives a cogent and compelling synthesis of these two great schools of thought and offers insight into the difficult subject of mysticism. I would highly recommend this book.
Kalrajas
Suzuki takes the reader through a contrast and comparison of the "mystical" experience and the commonalities between Christian and Buddhist awakening and/or the mystical spiritual experience.
Fordrelis
This is an excellent overview on a complex often misunderstood topic.
I_LOVE_228
*NOTE This book is almost *identically* titled to 2 other seemingly similar works by this author published by other companies under the same title. This one, with a yellowish background and black type is the 2002 by Dover -- Mysticism: Christian and Buddhist. I own the 2002 publication and mentioned it to someone who asked me if it was "that new one?". I answered no, but it seems that the books may be very similar indeed. The 2002 book (isbn 0486425088 and is 214 pages NOT 240 as stated on Amazon) includes weighty ponderances of Meister Ekhart's writings and Buddhist texts and precepts. Perhaps D.T. Suzuki has evolved some further elucidation? or perhaps different publishing houses each molded the text to their liking? I don't know but there you have some info that might help your purchase.
Blueshaper
D.T. Suzuki was in his time a well known scholar on Buddhism, especially the Japanese Zen variety, and was later appointed a Professor of Buddhist Philosophy.

In 1948 Suzuki studied some sermons of Meister Eckhart and wrote this little book, pointing out what he felt were the close connections between the Meister's ideas and those of Zen Buddhism.

Having studied both Christian and Buddhist spiritual traditions myself quite closely, I think Suzuki has tried but failed to find common ground between these two great world religions.

Nowhere in Eckhart's sermons or tracts for example, does Eckhart conceive of God as Buddhist 'emptiness' or 'shunyata.' While it is true Eckhart felt God was One, and this One was above being itself, Eckhart also believed this One was a Trinity and contained a super-richness or overflowing of being, rather than a void which mysteriously and transcendently is the source of all other things. The Buddhist ideas which Suzuki refers to have far more in common with those of Oriental mysticism, such as the Tao of Lao Tzu or the Brahman of the Upanishads. Eckhart's idea is closer to Gregory of Nyssa or Dionysius, who saw God as infinite, perfectly One, incomprehensible but also a Trinity.

However many of Eckhart's ideas do have paralells in Buddhism, especially those on 'detachment', imageless contemplation (something shared with Evagrius Ponticus, a 4th century Eastern Christian monk) and the ground of the soul, which may be compared with the Buddhist notion of the inherent 'Buddha nature' shared by all beings. Yet, I think Eckhart is best considered what he really was, a Catholic mystic who saw himself as an Orthodox Christian through and through, rather than a Zen master in disguise.