Download Jesus fb2

by Michael Grant
Download Jesus fb2
Theology
  • Author:
    Michael Grant
  • ISBN:
    1898799881
  • ISBN13:
    978-1898799887
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Rigel (October 31, 2004)
  • Pages:
    261 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Theology
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1158 kb
  • ePUB format
    1214 kb
  • DJVU format
    1694 kb
  • Rating:
    4.6
  • Votes:
    403
  • Formats:
    txt docx azw doc


Grant's book provides a compellingly detailed and vivid portrait of the historical Jesus, one that will be perhaps criticised as too generous by religious critics. Michael Grant's work is still the best short book on Jesus the man. The basic story is quite simple.

Grant's book provides a compellingly detailed and vivid portrait of the historical Jesus, one that will be perhaps criticised as too generous by religious critics. Grant concludes even without any of the mythical truth claims Jesus' life should be valued by humanists as the highest level of attainment a human being has ever achived in history, which will no doubt raise a few hackles among those relying on Grant's historical deconstruction to provide ammunition against Christian constructions of Jesus.

Michael Grant's work is still the best short book on Jesus the ma. Grant's book provides a compellingly detailed and vivid portrait of the historical Jesus, one that will be perhaps criticised as too generous by religious critics.

Michael Grant's work is still the best short book on Jesus the man.

Renowned historian Michael Grant analyzes the stories behind the gospels in an attempt to bring us the real Jesus: his upbringing, relationships, teachings, miracles and final days in Jerusalem. Renowned historian Michael Grant analyzes the stories behind the gospels in an attempt to bring us the real Jesus: his upbringing, relationships, teachings, miracles and final days in Jerusalem.

He seeks to separate those portions of the gospels that refer to the true career and teachings of Jesus, from the subsequent additions or inventions by the evangelists.

Michael Grant, a classicist, states: "In recent years, 'no serious scholar has ventured to postulate the non historicity of Jesus,' or at any rate very few, and they have not succeeded in disposing of the much stronger, indeed very abundant, evidence to the contrary. There are those who argue that Jesus is a figment of the Church’s imagination, that there never was a Jesus at all. I have to say that I do not know any respectable critical scholar who says that any more.

Jesus by Michael Grant. 2 people like this topic. Want to like this Page?

I had never heard of Michael Grant at all, much less this specific book. Michael Grant (1914-2004) was a highly successful and renowned historian of the ancient world.

I had never heard of Michael Grant at all, much less this specific book. He held many academic posts including those of Fellow of Trinity College, Cambridge; Professor of Humanity at Edinburgh University; Vice Chancellor of The Queen's University, Belfast and Vice Chancellor of the University of Khartoum.

p. cm. Summary: In the near future, the conjoined Armstrong twins, under the guise of the Armstrong Fancy Gifts Corporation, plot to create their own version of utopia using nanobots, while a guerilla group known as BZRK develops a DNA-based biot that can stop bots, but at risk of the host’s brain. Printed in the United States of America.

Plague, Michael Grant's fourth book in the bestselling Gone series, will satisfy dystopian fans of all ages. The Matrix meets Inner Space in this third book in the BZRK trilogy from New York Times best-selling author Michael Grant. 2 193. Published: 2011. World War II. The most terrible war in human history. Millions are dead; millions more are still to die. The Nazis rampage across Europe and eye far-off America. The staggering conclusion to the BZRK trilogy, from the author of GONE.

Most information about Jesus is found in the four Gospels of Matthew, Mark, Luke and John. Michael Grant looks at these Gospels with an historianâ?s eye, treating them in exactly the same way as he would any other works of ancient literature capable of yielding historical information. The picture of Jesus which emerges is in some respects a new and unfamiliar one. There was no â?gentle Jesus, meek and mildâ? says Dr Grant â? nor was Jesus a political revolutionary, as is often claimed. Jesus, although readily moved to compassion and anger by the sufferings he witnessed, ruthlessly subordinated his every act and thought to the success of his great mission. His admonishments to turn the other cheek, love thy neighbour, welcome sinners and render unto Caesar did not so much indicate a love of peace, a sentimental affection for humanity or a respect for the imperial government as a desire to deal quickly with what he considered to be matters that were subordinate and secondary to the main issue, thus enabling his disciples to concentrate wholly on the dawning and imminent realisation of the Kingdom of God.

Kiutondyl
This has got to be one of the best books I have read on the subject of the historical Jesus. Grant stays mostly impartial throughout the book, although he does continuously put things in light of his own view of Jesus, who he believes was an apocalyptic preacher. Frankly, after reading this book, I'm quite surprised more scholars DON'T proffer this view.
As to an earlier reviewer's claim of misinformation, the fact is that the most recent Bible scholarship agrees with Grant on most of those issues. I sincerely wish that Grant will update his text in the next edition to include more recent scholarly work.
What I most liked about this book was the lack of pushing a political or religious agenda. Many many books about the "historical" Jesus start with a claim and then try to find the evidence to back it up. Grant seems to do what all good historians should: look at all the evidence and derive a conclusion from it. Of course, from a strictly historical point of view, things must be interpreted through a naturalist world view, and this is what will most likely offend most traditional Christians who take the supernatural aspects of the Gospels as literal events inside history. Overall, this is a very interesting read if you would like to learn more about the history behind the Gospels.
the monster
Martin Dibelius (1883-1947) was a German theologian and New Testament professor at the University of Heidelberg.

In this 1939 book, Dibelius states the book's purpose as "to determine what we can know of the historical phenomenon Jesus. In so doing it cannot demonstrate to faith what faith, and faith alone, is competent to say, but it can make clear to Christian believers and opponents alike just what is at issue between them."

Unlike the more complete skepticism of his peer Rudolf Bultmann (e.g., his The History of the Synoptic Tradition), Dibelius believes that "we can see that Jesus' sayings were handed down with great fidelity, thanks to the unemcumbered memory of his unspoiled followers and to their reverence for their Master's word."

Here are some representative quotations from the book:

"Whether Jesus himself received or discovered his mission at the moment of baptism, as is implied by the Christian story of the heavenly voice, is something we do not know."
"Jesus never specifically interpreted the expression 'Kingdom of God.'"
"Jesus knew himself to be the Messiah chosen by God, especially when he made his entrance into Jerusalem and appeared in the Temple as Lord."
"That in this sense Jesus affirmed his rank as Son of Man or Messiah is also shown, finally, by his execution as pretender to the throne."
"This is indeed the first and foremost demand of the message of Jesus: Be ready for God's Kingdom."

This book is still of continuing interest to students of the historical Jesus, Form Criticism, New Testament studies, etc.
Zainn
This is a superb book, reviewing the gospels from a historical standpoint that is neither preachy nor dismissive. Grant boils down the contradicting mess of the gospels and picks out the salient points that appear to have meant the most to Jesus. He reminds us that everything Jesus did, that we now take for proof of divinity and compassion was done to ensure the spreading of his message that: The Kingdom of God is Now and I (Jesus) am personally bringing it to the people on behalf of my father (God). He backs up this claim with ample proof and good prose. This book is inviting and just the right length, right when you have had about all of the Jesus you can take Grant comes to his conclusion and ends his book on a high note. Lovely.
BORZOTA
Martin Dibelius (1883-1947) was a German theologian and New Testament professor at the University of Heidelberg. He also wrote books such as From Tradition to Gospel,Paul, etc.

In this 1939 book, Dibelius states the book's purpose as "to determine what we can know of the historical phenomenon Jesus. In so doing it cannot demonstrate to faith what faith, and faith alone, is competent to say, but it can make clear to Christian believers and opponents alike just what is at issue between them."

Unlike the more complete skepticism of his peer Rudolf Bultmann (e.g., his The History of the Synoptic Tradition), Dibelius believes that "we can see that Jesus' sayings were handed down with great fidelity, thanks to the unemcumbered memory of his unspoiled followers and to their reverence for their Master's word."

Here are some representative quotations from the book:

"Whether Jesus himself received or discovered his mission at the moment of baptism, as is implied by the Christian story of the heavenly voice, is something we do not know."
"Jesus never specifically interpreted the expression 'Kingdom of God.'"
"Jesus knew himself to be the Messiah chosen by God, especially when he made his entrance into Jerusalem and appeared in the Temple as Lord."
"That in this sense Jesus affirmed his rank as Son of Man or Messiah is also shown, finally, by his execution as pretender to the throne."
"This is indeed the first and foremost demand of the message of Jesus: Be ready for God's Kingdom."

This book is still of continuing interest to students of the historical Jesus, Form Criticism, New Testament studies, etc.