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by John A. Sanford
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Theology
  • Author:
    John A. Sanford
  • ISBN:
    0824510917
  • ISBN13:
    978-0824510916
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Crossroad Pub Co; 1St Edition edition (July 1, 1991)
  • Pages:
    180 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Theology
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    1881 kb
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    1422 kb
  • DJVU format
    1323 kb
  • Rating:
    4.4
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    940
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John A. "Jack" Sanford (26 July 1929 – 17 October 2005) was an American Jungian analyst and Episcopal priest. John A. Sanford was born in Moorestown, New Jersey, a township in Burlington County. His parents were both leaders in the spiritual healing movement. His father, Edgar L. Sanford, was born in Vermont in 1890 and was an Episcopal priest, as was his own father and grandfather. He was the author of God's Healing Power.

Select Format: Hardcover. ISBN13:9780824513702.

a Jungian analyst looks at reincarnation. Published 1991 by Crossroad in New York. Reincarnation, Christianity and reincarnation, Reincarnation therapy, Seelenwanderung, Christianity

a Jungian analyst looks at reincarnation. Reincarnation, Christianity and reincarnation, Reincarnation therapy, Seelenwanderung, Christianity.

Home John A. Sanford Soul Journey: A Jungian Analyst Looks at Reincarnation

Home John A. Sanford Soul Journey: A Jungian Analyst Looks at Reincarnation. Soul Journey: A Jungian Analyst Looks at Reincarnation. ISBN 10: 0824510917, ISBN 13: 9780824510916. Is reincarnation the soul's proper destiny? And if not, what then is? The author explores these questions, and much more, in this thoughtful and non-polemical overview of a subject that has fascinated humanity for centuries.

Soul Journey: A Jungian Analyst Looks at Reincarnation. online obituary with biographical notes). Profiles in Jungian-Christian Dialogue: Sanford video interview. Video interview with Sanford. Web page for Silverado Senior Living, where Sanford lived until his death. Sanford (1929-2005), also known by the nickname Jack, was a parish priest for 19 years before starting his . New York, NY: The Crossroad Publishing Company. Sanford (1929-2005), also known by the nickname Jack, was a parish priest for 19 years before starting his private practice as a psychoanalyst. He focused his work on the intersections between inner growth as offered in depth psychology and Christianity. He studied with Fritz Kunkel and completed his training in Jungian analysis at the . Jung Institute in Los Angeles. Healing Body and Soul: The Meaning of Illness in the New Testament and in Psychotherapy. Louisville, KY: John Knox Press.

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Where did the idea of reincarnation come from? Why do some people find the teaching so satisfying? Is it true that some individuals can remember past lives? Do we find the idea of reincarnation in the Bible? Does it have a place in modern psychology? What did C. G. Jung have to say about it? What is the soul? Does psychology have any insights into the reality of the soul? Is reincarnation the soul's proper destiny? And if not, what then is? The author explores these questions, and much more, in this thoughtful and non-polemical overview of a subject that has fascinated humanity for centuries.

Dranar
Lucky genuine Autograph by author John A. Sanford.
Before I even read this interesting book, I would like to thank Amazon for something curious and unexpected: I almost own all books written from my respected author John A. Sanford, and can say that I am now a fervent admirer of him. So, when this -used- book arrived, I saw the pencil signature indicating previous ownership of the book, and, upon reading it for a third time: Oh!, this is an autograph from Rev Sanford to a lady by the name Karin Mack. So now I have a book kind of autographed by ¨Jack¨s own handwriting. By the way, I am the individual that created and uploaded the information about John A: Sanford in Wikipedia, so, if any person knows more of his life and facts, and owns a nice portrait from him, please, upload it to Wikipedia Commons, so it could be added to the main Wiki page on "Jack Sanford". This wonderful human being, in my humble opinion, needs to be more recognised and read. [email protected]
Cerana
In his book SOUL JOURNEY: A JUNGIAN ANALYST LOOKS AT REINCARNATION (1991 Crossroad Publishing, NY), John A. Sanford examines theories of the soul in Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity, and the writings of psychoanalyst Carl Jung, and has produced extremely clear and concise explanations of complex Eastern concepts.
Concurrently, Sanford thoroughly examines the various concepts of reincarnation as they appeared in the most ancient scriptures of India through more modern interpretations; as they were taught by the Buddha and his followers; as they were understood by Greek mathematician and philosopher Pythagoras and later explained by Plato; as they were believed by some (but not the mainstream) of the early Christians; and as they are generally perceived by Westerners today.
Sanford is not uncritical, and uncovers weaknesses in the various theories of the soul and what becomes of it after death. He does not personally believe in reincarnation - first because he honestly admits he doesn't relish the idea of returning for another life in this world, and second because he finds it impossible to reconcile the inconsistencies and paradoxes he finds in Eastern as well as contemporary Western concepts. Sanford takes the position that every time it is necessary to adjust a theory to correct a flaw, the theory is weakened, until eventually the original idea must be considered false. He is unwilling to accept a reconstruction of the theory of reincarnation using the most reasonable components of diverse religious beliefs.
Of interest to animal advocates, Sanford points out that all of the ancients - including Christians and Jews - considered it obvious that animals had been endowed with souls just like human beings. It was in the Middle Ages that official Christian doctrine begin denying that animals had immortal souls, no doubt in an attempt to silence lingering doubts about the mistreatment of animals throughout Christendom. Sanford seems to consider it a major weakness of contemporary Western reincarnationism that proponents often seem to believe that only human beings reincarnate as other human beings. He shows how the math of human population growth would allow for only a small percentage of humans alive today having had previous human lives. According to Sanford, even some Eastern teachers and would-be gurus have been denying Hindu principles of reincarnation of animals in order to gain followers among Westerners.
Sanford is not the first to point out that a belief in karma is quite capable of lulling one into an apathetic acceptance of the suffering of others. It is all too easy to be comforted by the idea that everyone deserves the misery they are experiencing, that the miserable must live through their karma in order to expiate it, and that it is even wrong to interfere with the karmic process by seeking to relieve the suffering of others. Sanford explains how the law of karma provides a sense of cosmic justice but at the expense of the Christian idea of divine grace - which is capable of relieving us from our miseries even when the suffering is well deserved. As I personally understand the teachings of Jesus, divine grace flows from acts of mercy and compassion, with grace falling on the merciful as well as uplifting the object of one's mercy. Doing good for the benefit of others is recognized as being of great spiritual value in all religions, but compassion may be as much a passive pursuit as a call to action in some traditions.
Sanford was an Episcopalian (Anglican) priest but left his religious ministry to study psychoanalysis as conceived by Carl Jung. It is quite apparent in his writings that Sanford remains a devout Christian, which may account for his strong preference for the idea of the everlasting individual soul. However he finds his preference corroborated in Jung's theory of the individuation process of the (personal) self. I share Sanford's incredulity at the idea that the individual soul strives for perfection and completion, through one or many lifetimes, only to be extinguished at the point of enlightenment. For myself, if dissolving into the oneness of God is our ultimate purpose, then I see no point to ever having emerged from the oneness of God in the first place. There would seem to be no meaning to our lives.
Jung, on the other hand - as I understand Jung's own writings - believed that the point of existence was to become "conscious," by which Jung meant the forging of a completed personality whose contradictions and oppositions had been fully integrated into a single, undivided and self-aware entity through the process of self-examination. Jung further theorized that God is becoming conscious as we become conscious. In other words, it is through the perfection and completion of the personalities of every living being in the universe that God will become pure and non-dualistic consciousness. Although this would seem to contradict the Hindu belief that God/Brahman has always existed in a state of pure and non-dualistic consciousness, I find instead a resonance between Jung's theories of God and the Hindu concept of Brahman.
The idea that God reaches pure consciousness when all living beings attain pure consciousness also resonates with my personal conviction that no one gets to Nirvana until everyone gets to Nirvana, and that the pursuit of enlightenment for the purpose of getting oneself admitted to a state of eternal bliss is a folly, a conceit, and a waste of time. My reasoning is that the more enlightened we are, the more we understand that we are all essentially one. Thus we become more compassionate, and thus it follows that our compassion for the suffering of others will not allow us to be happy (or even free of negative emotion) when others are not. I feel that our compassion will keep drawing us back into life to try to relieve the misery of the world, even when our karma might otherwise allow us to be free of this world.
Unlike John Sanford, I have no aversion to a "marriage" of Eastern and Western beliefs. Indeed I believe the blending of religious ideas can bring us closer to the ultimate truth. In SOUL JOURNEY, Sanford demonstrates how the merger of Greek and Jewish ideas led to the Christian idea of the soul, and how Hinduism flowered from the grafting of early Indian reincarnationist ideas onto Brahmanism. Most of us know how Buddhism emerged from Hinduism. There is nothing to keep us from mixing together the great principles of all religions and distilling them into a more clear and purified essence.