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by Scott Bader-Saye
Download Church and Israel after Christendom: The Politics of Election fb2
Theology
  • Author:
    Scott Bader-Saye
  • ISBN:
    1597520780
  • ISBN13:
    978-1597520782
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Wipf & Stock Pub (January 31, 2005)
  • Pages:
    204 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Theology
  • Language:
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  • Rating:
    4.8
  • Votes:
    377
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Scott Bader-Saye's work contends that the church, in the wake of the Holocaust and the demise of Christendom, has the opportunity to recover its identity as a people grafted into Israel, dependent upon Israel's covenant election.

Scott Bader-Saye's work contends that the church, in the wake of the Holocaust and the demise of Christendom, has the opportunity to recover its identity as a people grafted into Israel, dependent upon Israel's covenant election. He argues that only a recovery of the church's covenantal relation to Israel can provide the resources to resist modernity's politics of voluntarism and violence.

Professor Bader-Saye joined the faculty of the Seminary of the Southwest in 2009. His publications include "Following Jesus in a Culture of Fear" and "Church and Israel After Christendom. Dr. Bader-Saye also serves as Theologian in Residence at St. Julian of Norwich Episcopal Churc Professor Bader-Saye joined the faculty of the Seminary of the Southwest in 2009

In his pathbreaking new work, Church and Israel after Christendom, Scott Bader-Saye contends that a renewed understanding of Israel might provide resources to envision a faithful post-Christendom church.

In his pathbreaking new work, Church and Israel after Christendom, Scott Bader-Saye contends that a renewed understanding of Israel might provide resources to envision a faithful post-Christendom church.

Bader-Saye, S. (1999). Church And Israel After Christendom. This book presents two seismic events. The first is the demise of the Christendom paradigm, in which the church was positioned as the spiritual sponsor of Western civilization. The second event is the Holocaust, the Shoah, the systematic attempt by a "Christian nation" to eradicate the Jews. WithScott Bader–Saye. Aristotle or Abraham? WithScott Bader–Saye.

Two seismic events mark the twentieth century as one of crisis for the Church. The first is the demise of the Christendom paradigm that positioned the Church as spiritual sponsor of Western Civilization. The second is the Holocaust, the horrors of which have prompted both the Roman Catholic and Protestant churches to repudiate the teachings and attitudes undergirding their dark history of Jewish persecution.

Church and Israel After Christendom: The Politics of Election. Britannia, Europa and Christendom: British Christians and European integration. He began: This book is about the death of Christian Britain - the demise of the nation’s core religious and moral identit. t took several centurie. o convert Britain to Christianity, but it has taken less than forty years for the country to forsake it.

Beyond Reductionism", First Things 87 (November 1998): 55-57.

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Scott Bader-Saye helps us counteract this destructive force in Following . He is the author of Church and Israel after Christendom: The Politics of Election.

Scott Bader-Saye helps us counteract this destructive force in Following Jesus in a Culture of Fear. Divided into three sections (Diagnosis, Antidote, and Recovery), this work draws insights about fear from medieval theologian Thomas Aquinas. Furthermore, Bader-Saye stresses the importance of sharing our fears in ecclesial communities, where we can develop courage. We live in a time when this biblical refrain cannot be repeated too often.

Two seismic events mark the twentieth century as one of crisis for the Church. The first is the demise of the Christendom paradigm that positioned the Church as spiritual sponsor of Western Civilization. The second is the Holocaust, the horrors of which have prompted both the Roman Catholic and Protestant churches to repudiate the teachings and attitudes undergirding their dark history of Jewish persecution. The cumulative effect of these two events is that Christians have been called to rethink their own doctrines and practices, especially with regard to the Church's prior conviction that it had replaced Israel in God's plan. In his pathbreaking new work, 'Church and Israel After Christendom' Scott Bader-Saye contends that a renewed understanding of Israel might provide resources to envision a faithful post-Christendom Church. Unlike theologians such as John Milbank and Stanley Hauerwas, who have pointed to the Greek polis as a model for renewing ecclesiology, the author suggests that it is not to Aristotle but to Abraham that the church should look in order to articulate and incarnate a faithful alternative to the voluntarism and violence of modernity. The doctrine of election is the linchpin linking a renewed understanding of Israel with a renewed vision of the post-Christendom Church. By recovering a doctrine of election that is both non-supersessionist and fully Trinitarian, Christians may recover their political calling to embody a way of life shaped by covenant freedom and messianic peace.

Marilace
an important book on a nuanced and supportive theological view of Israel/Jewish people
Livina
Scott Bader-Saye's work contends that the church, in the wake of the Holocaust and the demise of Christendom, has the opportunity to recover its identity as a people grafted into Israel, dependent upon Israel's covenant election. Rather than merely arguing against supersessionism, Bader-Saye develops a fascinating account of the political consequences of this new vision. He argues that only a recovery of the church's covenantal relation to Israel can provide the resources to resist modernity's politics of voluntarism and violence. This is a stimulating piece of integrative theological thinking, linking theology, ethics, biblical studies, and cultural analysis to create a fresh paradigm for understanding our identities as Jews and Christians. Since the twentienth century has tragically proved the lethal dangers of the old paradigm, the need for such fresh reflection is urgent. This book-with its incisive critique of MacIntyre, Milbank, and Hauerwas-is sure to provoke intense and constructive discussion in the theological world.
Still In Mind
At 196 pages this price is outrageous. Why is this priced to high?