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by Ian COTTON
Download The Hallelujah revolution: the rise of the New Christians fb2
Ministry & Evangelism
  • Author:
    Ian COTTON
  • ISBN:
    0316907448
  • ISBN13:
    978-0316907446
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Little, Brown & Co; First Edition edition (1995)
  • Pages:
    288 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Ministry & Evangelism
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1417 kb
  • ePUB format
    1471 kb
  • DJVU format
    1604 kb
  • Rating:
    4.3
  • Votes:
    199
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The Hallelujah Revolution book.

The Hallelujah Revolution book. The Hallelujah Revolution describes the charismatic religious revival currently sweeping Great Britain and the world with a focus on "miracles", the supernatural, and the transcendental. The new Evangelical movement is revolutionizing what it means to be a Christian today, and proving to be a significant social and political force.

The Hallelujah Revolution : The Rise of the New Christians. This button opens a dialog that displays additional images for this product with the option to zoom in or out. Tell us if something is incorrect. The Hallelujah Revolution : The Rise of the New Christians.

Hallelujah Revolution' is a look at one of the most interesting Christian phenomena at the turn of the Millennium .

Cotton spends the first half of the book looking at the characteristics and origins of this movement

Personal Name: Cotton, Ian. Publication, Distribution, et. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database.

Personal Name: Cotton, Ian. Amherst, . Prometheus Books, (c)1996. All rights are reserved by their owners. Download book The hallelujah revolution : the rise of the new Christians, Ian Cotton.

The hallelujah revolution. the rise of the new Christians. Published 1996 by Prometheus Books in Amherst, . Christianity, Church history, Evangelicalism, Forecasting, Pentecostalism, Religious Psychology. xix, 242 p. ; Number of pages.

British journalist Ian Cotton has written for the Sunday Times, the Observer, the Daily Telegraph, and the Guardian. He is the author of The Hallelujah Revolution: The Rise of the New Christians (Prometheus Books, 1996), from which this article is excerpted

British journalist Ian Cotton has written for the Sunday Times, the Observer, the Daily Telegraph, and the Guardian. He is the author of The Hallelujah Revolution: The Rise of the New Christians (Prometheus Books, 1996), from which this article is excerpted. Dr. Persinger’s God Machine. Free Inquiry Volume 17, No. 1 Winter 1996, 1997 Ian Cotton.

A new Christian religious revival is sweeping the world. It is a conservative, politically motivated fundamentalism that is challenging (and be challenged by) traditional Christian concern for the poor, the needy, and the underprivileged in an age of uncertainty. The Hallelujah Revolution examines and explains this new tic movement that is revolutionizing what it means to be a Christian today. Categories: Religious Right.

The Hallelujah Revolution: The Rise of the New Christians. Little, Brown and Company Pounds 1. 9. Clearly Cotton established a degree of trust with a wide mix of personalities and the book contains some colourful and entertaining first-hand reporting

The Hallelujah Revolution: The Rise of the New Christians. The Storm is Passing over: A Look at Black Churches in Britain. Clearly Cotton established a degree of trust with a wide mix of personalities and the book contains some colourful and entertaining first-hand reporting. here are the now patriarchal Roger Forster of Ichthus and former retailer Gerald Coates of the Cobham Christian Fellowship; Richard, Carol, and Psalm are at the sharp end working out their faith among the south London terraces; Pauline lost. her franchise and a fortune when Body Shop accused her of imposing her beliefs on staff.

Hello readers! Welcome to my brand new blog, The Christian Revolution! .

Hello readers! Welcome to my brand new blog, The Christian Revolution! At this point, I am sure that most of you reading this will understand what a blog is and what it is intended to do. That being said, my hope in writing on The Christian Revolution blog is that I (and any future guest contributors) will be able t.


Nilador
`The Hallelujah Revolution' is a look at one of the most interesting Christian phenomena at the turn of the Millennium - the rapid growth of the Evangelical / Charismatic movement. A movement now spreading so rapidly that, according to Cotton, "far from being on the fringe, Evangelicals are currently taking over the mainstream."
Cotton spends the first half of the book looking at the characteristics and origins of this movement. He defines these new Christians as follows: Evangelicals believe that the essence of the Gospels consists in the doctrine of salvation by faith in the atoning death of Christ. They therefore deny that either good works or the sacraments have any saving efficacy, while seeing themselves as having a responsibility to bring others to Christ. The term `Charismatic' refers to Christians who seek a post conversion experience called `baptism in the Holy Spirit'. Such baptism may bring one or more of these gifts: - ability to speak in tongues, to perform healing through prayer, to prophesy, to discern spirits, perform exorcisms and deliverances, and, receive dreams and visions.
Cotton sees the social origins of the E/C movement as arising from the particular uncertainties of the late Twentieth Century. These enduring uncertainties and the impotence of rationalism in solving them created a Zeitgeist in which people desire simultaneously both the solid certainties of doctrine, and the fluid outpourings of charisma. The E/C movement derives its doctrinal certainty from the Bible, while its outpourings of charisma lead to social action from a sense of community responsibility. The examples given of faith in action, supplanting ineffective social welfare agencies, are of Ichthus (runs many programs, such as for teenagers on drugs), and Pecan (a successful back to work scheme). They have a touching directness and unpretentiousness about them.
The accounts of conversion experiences provide compelling reading, both for the human interest, and because of the obvious transformational effect of the conversion. The section (chapter 8) on the drug induced conversion of both `tripping' partners shows how the change becomes real, extends through all aspects of their lives, and out into the community around them.
However in the second half of the book Cotton digs himself into a hole and he cannot get out of it. He implicitly accepts the Freudian view of religion as psychopathology. Freud claimed religion has as its source a neurotic remnant of infantile adoration of the father. The adult, unable to face the uncertainties of living, projects the infantile adoration of the father onto an imagined `super-father' we call God, who becomes responsible for controlling all the uncertainties of life beyond our control.
From this present but unstated axiom Cotton shoulders the self-defeating task of examining the inspirational or divine from a materialist perspective. In a range of reductive chapters he tries to source the religious experience to psychological origins, or organic determinants in the brain. He cites the association of stress and uncertainty in people in the pre-conversion phase. He notes the similarities between the processes of conversion and brain washing. He peruses the `religious' experiences of Huxley who took LSD and Mescaline, and the surgeon Wilder Penfield's work on electrical stimulation of parts of the cerebral cortex. But he leaves the important questions unasked: Does the documented association of stress and uncertainty with the pre conversion state necessarily devalue the conversion? Have LSD experiences been real enough to sustain a lifetime of LSD religion, and have they wrought transformational changes to values? If electrical stimulation of the cortex leads to an experience with religious content does this imply a non-validity of faith, and does the same apply when such stimulation leads to experiences involving hunger or sexual content?
There are interesting chapters on misdiagnoses in claimed miracle cures, on an experiment on therapeutic touch, and on Michael Persinger's laboratory induced mystical experiences. There is also a fashionably obligatory but pointless chapter on Left/Right Brain functioning.
This book is an interesting work, but ultimately limited by its reductive approach, which is insufficient to explain the teleological shift to a set of higher values. There is no doubt that transformational changes are wrought in the lives of converts, and these changes go well beyond the shedding of one ideology for commitment to another. They include better mental health and more effective lives over a range of areas, and in particular, improved social relations and greater ability to face and deal with problems. Any work attempting to fairly assess the E/C movement must address this issue. And there is also a wider theological issue that requires addressing: How can the E/C movement be so effective and lead to enduring and far reaching transformational changes in the lives of converts when at its heart there is a self contradictory paradox?
The paradox of Christian fundamentalism is that an omnipotent and omnipresent God is bound by the same space/time limitations that bind you and I. God is, in effect, trapped in His decreed limitation set by the Dispensation of Grace 2000 years ago, when at a precise point in history the Divine and Temporal intersected. The fundamentalist Christian claim is that God's grace and presence in the lives of man can only be validated by commitment to today's version of what transpired at that time, through the redeeming blood of Christ in the Atonement. But what of God? Is He bound by these rules, or can He redeem whosoever He chooses, or even send later exhalted souls to guide men?
An omnipotent and omnipresent God contradicts the fundamentalist reference back to the a priori requirement of the Atonement. Yet, despite their essentially mechanistic theology there is a transformational power at work in these Christians. How can this be? What are the implications?
As cotton says, "Clearly we are living through the fastest expansion of Christianity ever...." It is a pity his account of `the rise of the new Christians' did not look at some of these other questions that dogged his heels at every step.
Goltigor
Back in the days before easy two-way communications, newspapers sometimes printed dubious dispatches from distant parts with the notice: "Important if true."

Ian Cotton's contention that the Christian world is being swept by a revival that is both evangelical and charismatic in character and left in political orientation would certainly be important. But is it true?

Cotton, a British journalist, calls the phenomenon "do-it-yourself religion," because its organization is loose and local. He equates it with various trendy business concepts, such as the "virtual corporation."

However, he does not explain how this is different from the loose and local organization that has always existed in the world epiceter of charismatic Christianity, which I would place in Cleveland, Tenn., headquarters of two of the most important old-line Bible-believing sects.

Surprisingly, although Cotton traveled from Dallas to Toronto in his search for this phenomenon, and all over southern England, he never ventured into its historical homeland, the Deep South.

According to him, in 1900 only 1% of Christians described themselves as charismatic. Most of these would have been Southerners (and they would have called themselves pentecostals or primitive, not charismatic). Today, 25% of Christians (including Roman Catholics) think of themselves as charismatic, and predictions were (in 1996, when "The Hallelujah Revolution" was published) that the proportion will reach 30% by 2000. That's 400 million people.

The first hurdle in persuading us that there is a new, large and important evangelical/charismatic movement is to explain how the two concepts can exist in one mind. Historically, these groups have had a hard time getting along (which is why Cleveland, Tenn., has two sect headquarters).

Cotton says the people he interviewed do not have this problem. Instead, he says, they demonstrate "extreme emotional lability," all buttoned-down business one moment, rolling on the floor ectasy the next.

Cotton says the lead in this kind of worship today has migrated. "The U.K. is calling the shots in the U.S.," he reports from Texas. His main evidence is the annual worldwide March for Jesus, which originated in England.

But the U.K. movement is, Cotton says, a kind of Christian socialism, and if there is such a thing as an American fundamentalist leftist, I haven't met him. Neither, to all appearances, has Bob Dole, whose campaign gestures have all been toward what has been described by political scientist Leo Ribuffo as "the old Christian right."

Cotton's "Hallelujah Revolution" is closely bound up with feelings of economic malaise and "postmodern uncertainty" blamed on Thatcherism by those who didn't grab the brass ring. (Surprisingly, he did his research in southern England, to which all the benefits of Thatcherism flowed; one wonders what he would have found had he visited the areas that were gutted by Thatcher, like southern Scotland.)

Be that as it may, despite their professed disdain for materialims, most of Cotton's new sectarians are on the dole. This, too, is a message that has hardly penetrated American pentecostalism, where parasitical fundamentalism, as represented most flamboyantly by the Rev. Ike Eikendarian, is just a minor variant.

Whatever is going on, Cotton ascribes it largely to the stress of modern living. "It's not an accident that religious conversion often follows a period of serious (mental) depression," he writes.

But then he goes on to drag in quantum mechancis, Schopenhauer, McLuhan and the living prophet John Naisbitt. Never mind that Naisbitt's prophecies generally are not coming to pass, this scattershop approach can link anything to anything.

UPDATE: This review was written when the book was published in 1996. Today, in 2008, the notion of a leftist evangelical movement, at least in the United States, seems absurd.