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by Roxanne Mountford
Download The Gendered Pulpit: Preaching in American Protestant Spaces (Studies in Rhetorics and Feminisms) fb2
Ministry & Evangelism
  • Author:
    Roxanne Mountford
  • ISBN:
    0809325349
  • ISBN13:
    978-0809325344
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Southern Illinois University Press; 1st edition (November 3, 2003)
  • Pages:
    216 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Ministry & Evangelism
  • Language:
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    1362 kb
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    1577 kb
  • Rating:
    4.9
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    647
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Mountford's examinations of the rhetoric inherent in preaching manuals from 1850 to the present provide insight into how "manliness" has remained a central concept in American preaching since the mid-nineteenth century.

Mountford's examinations of the rhetoric inherent in preaching manuals from 1850 to the present provide insight into how "manliness" has remained a central concept in American preaching since the mid-nineteenth century.

The Gendered Pulpit book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking The Gendered Pulpit: Preaching in American Protestant Spaces as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Studies in Rhetorics and Feminisms. Southern Illinois University Press.

The Gendered Pulpit : Preaching in American Protestant Spaces. This button opens a dialog that displays additional images for this product with the option to zoom in or out. Tell us if something is incorrect. The Gendered Pulpit : Preaching in American Protestant Spaces. Studies in Rhetorics and Feminisms.

book by Roxanne Mountford. In this feminist investigation into the art of preaching-one of the oldest and least studied rhetorical traditions-Roxanne Mountford explores the relationship between bodies, space, race, and gender in rhetorical performance and American Protestant culture.

In this feminist investigation into the art of preaching†one of the oldest and least studied rhetorical traditions†Roxanne Mountford explores the relationship between bodies, space, race, and gender in rhetorical performance and American Protestant culture. Refiguring delivery and physicality as significant components of the rhetorical situation, The Gendered Pulpit: Preaching in American Protestant Spaces examines the strategies of three contemporary women preachers who have transgressed traditions, rearranged rhetorical space, and conquered gender bias to establish greater intimacy with.

Examines women preachers' strategies for rearranging rhetorical space

Examines women preachers' strategies for rearranging rhetorical space. In this feminist investigation into the art of preaching - one of the oldest and least-studied rhetorical traditions - Roxanne Mountford explores the relationship between bodies, space, race, and gender in rhetorical performance and American Protestant culture.

Through a lucid examination of the boundaries of that gendered rhetorical space-and . Series: Studies in Rhetorics and Feminisms.

Through a lucid examination of the boundaries of that gendered rhetorical space-and the debate about who should occupy that space-Johnson explores the codes governing and challenging the American woman's proper rhetorical sphere in the postbellum years. While men were learning to preach, practice law, and set political policies, women were reading elocution manuals, letter-writing handbooks, and other conduct literature. These texts reinforced the conservative message that women's words mattered, but mattered mostly in the home. Paperback: 240 pages.

Up first is my conference with Roxanne Mountford She’s the author of The Gendered Pulpit: Preaching in American Protestant Spaces and coauthor of Women’s Ways of Making It in Rhetoric an. .

Up first is my conference with Roxanne Mountford. Dr. Mountford was the founding director of writing, rhetoric, and digital studies at the University of Kentucky, which she led to departmental status in April of this year. She’s also an associate professor in that department. She’s the author of The Gendered Pulpit: Preaching in American Protestant Spaces and coauthor of Women’s Ways of Making It in Rhetoric and Composition. Much of her current work is focused on the history of speaking and writing instruction in American colleges and universities throughout the twentieth century. She is, along with Bill Keith, one of the primary authors of The Mt.

In this feminist investigation into the art of preaching—one of the oldest and least studied rhetorical traditions—Roxanne Mountford explores the relationship between bodies, space, race, and gender in rhetorical performance and American Protestant culture. Refiguring delivery and physicality as significant components of the rhetorical situation, The Gendered Pulpit: Preaching in American Protestant Spaces examines the strategies of three contemporary women preachers who have transgressed traditions, rearranged rhetorical space, and conquered gender bias to establish greater intimacy with their congregations. 

 

Mountford’s examinations of the rhetoric inherent in preaching manuals from 1850 to the present provide insight into how “manliness” has remained a central concept in American preaching since the mid-nineteenth century. The manuals illustrate that the character, style, method of delivery, and theological purpose of preachers focused on white men and their cultural standing, leaving contemporary women preachers searching for ways to accommodate themselves to the physicality of preaching. 

 

Three case studies of women preachers who have succeeded or failed in rearranging rhetorical space provide the foundation for the volume. These contemporary examples have important implications for feminist theology and also reveal the importance of gender, space, and bodies to studies of rhetoric in general. Mountford explores the geographies of St. John’s Lutheran Church and the preaching of Rev. Patricia O’Connor who reformed rhetorical space through the delivery of her sermons. At Eastside United Church of Christ, Mountford shows, Rev. Barbara Hill employed narrative style and prophetic utterance in the tradition of black preaching to address gender bias and institute change in her congregation. The final case study details the experiences of Pastor Janet Moore and her struggles at Victory Hills United Methodist Church, where the fractured congregation could not be united even with Pastor Moore’s focus on theological purpose and invention strategies.