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by Ellen C. Maze
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Literature & Fiction
  • Author:
    Ellen C. Maze
  • ISBN:
    1432751018
  • ISBN13:
    978-1432751012
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Outskirts Press (November 13, 2009)
  • Pages:
    354 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Literature & Fiction
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1837 kb
  • ePUB format
    1953 kb
  • DJVU format
    1777 kb
  • Rating:
    4.4
  • Votes:
    462
  • Formats:
    lrf azw lrf rtf


Explaining all the reasons I love Ellen C. Maze's "Rabbit: Chasing Beth Rider," without any spoilers, is almost impossible because, although the novel reads like any fast-paced and exciting story of suspense.

Explaining all the reasons I love Ellen C. Maze's "Rabbit: Chasing Beth Rider," without any spoilers, is almost impossible because, although the novel reads like any fast-paced and exciting story of suspense, the underlying themes and symbolism are much more complex

Rabbit: Chasing Beth Rider is Ellen C Maze's Christian paranormal. It focuses on Beth Rider, a young novelist whose book has turned the lives of the Rakum upside down.

Rabbit: Chasing Beth Rider is Ellen C Maze's Christian paranormal. Recommends it for: christian fiction/horror, vampire fans, YA, suspense fans, thriller fans. I am honored to bring it to you, so much closer to my vision than the original version.

Author Beth Rider's second vampire novel has hit number one and she is flying high on her new-found fame. But at a fated book signing that runs late into the night, Beth is confronted by an evil she'd only experienced in nightmares

Author Beth Rider's second vampire novel has hit number one and she is flying high on her new-found fame. But at a fated book signing that runs late into the night, Beth is confronted by an evil she'd only experienced in nightmares. Jack Dawn, a supernatural monster belonging to an ancient race of bloodthirsty immortals known as the Rakum, vows to track down and kill the young writer because of the vile redemptive message her book is bringing his people. The Rakum have spread evil among mankind since the Beginning, growing in strength and influence with every passing century.

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Author Ellen C. Maze. It has already been released on Kindle for those of you who'd like to check it out. THANK YOU all for your support.

This story previously published in LOOSE RABBITS OF THE RABBIT TRILOGY with many other tales.

David belongs to a race of immortals known as Rakum-bloodthirsty and the very epitome of what today's vampires would be if they existed. Walk in David's shoes as he does his best to work out the kinks of his life, mixing with voluntary blood donors and a gay benefactor, all the while resisting the urge to kill. David belongs to a race of immortals known as Rakum-bloodthirsty and the very epitome of what today's vampires would be if they existed. This story previously published in LOOSE RABBITS OF THE RABBIT TRILOGY with many other tales.

Book in the Rabbit Series). What if your bestselling novel attracts the wrong kind of attention? Author Beth Rider's second vampire novel has hit number one and she is flying high on her new-found fame.

The best archive of free books on the Internet . that experience is one with which David will become intimately familiar in "David and the Dying Buzz.

Save bookmarks and read as many as you like. David Walker is a main character in the bestselling novel trilogy beginning with RABBIT: CHASING BETH RIDER. In this short, get a peek into his backstory and motivation for the events in the novels.

What if your bestselling novel attracts the wrong kind of attention? Author Beth Rider's second vampire novel has hit number one and she is flying high on her new-found fame. But at a fated book signing that runs late into the night, Beth is confronted by an evil she'd only experienced in nightmares. Jack Dawn, a supernatural monster belonging to an ancient race of bloodthirsty immortals known as the Rakum, vows to track down and kill the young writer because of the vile redemptive message her book is bringing his people. The Rakum have spread evil among mankind since the Beginning, growing in strength and influence with every passing century. A respected Elder among his brethren, Jack recognizes the novel's destructive potential and his duty to destroy her before the book's promises annihilate his Kind. His method of subduing the novelist is an ancient punishment perpetrated against humans who bring them the ultimate displeasure; Jack marks her as a Rabbit. By forcing her to ingest his poisonous blood, Beth's body now regenerates endlessly and she is set free to be tracked by his hungry brethren. The plan? His people will torture her, slowly, night after night, until she goes insane. Marking her was easy - now Jack only has to sit back and wait for the Rakum to do their worst.Jack's proselyte Michael Stone was brought up from his youth to be strong, sensible and oftentimes, brutal. But at one hundred and thirty, Michael is old enough to appreciate the quiet and ordered life he'd carved out for himself over the years. Aware that his Elder has marked a human for death, Michael is on the lookout as he leaves work late one night. When he stumbles upon the beautiful and apparently innocent Beth Rider, he is instantly smitten, despite the fact that a few seconds later he realizes that she is the target of his Elder's fury. Puzzled by Jack's unreasonable condemnation, Michael takes it upon himself to protect the lovely author from the limitless lust of his brethren. Rakum grunt Javier - Millier was never one to question the Fathers nor doubt the word of the Elders but after reading a curiously odd vampire novel, he begins to doubt the understood deity of his race. Soon identified by Jack Dawn as a traitor, Javier goes on the run with Elder Roman and a mortal with a personal hidden agenda. They also are in pursuit of the book's author, although their intentions are quite dissimilar from those of their brethren.Facing the most terrifying trial of her life against creatures known only in fables, one simple woman will unintentionally threaten the very existence of a powerful and accursed people. In the climactic mêlée, it is a race to the death, or if Beth has her way, a race to the life-of every Rakum who makes the choice.

Araath
60 feet of metal spring drooped languidly around my feet. I had accidentally pulled the starter cord on my leaf-blower all the way off and opened the motor to try to fix it. There's this really long thin piece of metal coiled up inside the motor that retracts the cord when you release it. I let it slip out of it's casing, SPROING! The ending of this book struck me the same way--for hundreds of pages Maze slowly cranked up the tension. She slowly twisted that metal spring in my gut tighter and tighter and tighter. I was riveted--the evil Rakum, the innocent and alluring Beth Rider, the valiant but conflicted hero, the delightfully detestable fawning cows, the secret past of the wicked Elders slowly revealing itself ... And then, in the home stretch, SPROING! All the tension suddenly evaporated and the whole plot was left in wobbly gobs around my feat. It was a textbook case of, Deus ex machina, "God from the machine" where the author brings in an unexpected miracle to save the heroine from certain doom. That plot device has an insidious way of invalidating all of the suffering and anguish up to that point; you kind of lose interest 'cause nothing that happened earlier in the plot seems to matter anymore. And it became a bit smarmy, cloying and sentimental at the end which jarred discordantly with the rest of the book. I got the impression she had written to many words (according to someone's standard) and had to end it abruptly.

I hope you can tell that I liked the book--a lot--and it's only because I was so into it that the ending left me frustrated and disappointed. Part of the problem may have been that I was reading on my Kindle and didn't realize that 63% progress was 99% of the way through the book. Ms. Maze includes tons of extra chapters as "bonus material" at the end of the book that look at the history of some of the characters in more depth. I was expecting another third of a novel when I hit the last page. Disoriented and confused, I turned the page only to find the epilogue ...

I loved the way Ms. Maze worked her Christian worldview into this story. Her perspective as a Messianic Jew was like a foreign and exotic spice in a familiar dish.
Heri
The real significance of the expression "truth is stranger than fiction" becomes apparent to novelist Beth Rider one seemingly normal evening at a book signing, when she is suddenly accosted by a stranger who later marks her as a target, a "rabbit," to be hunted by a legendary ancient race. What follows is one of the most original and inspiring vampire stories I've ever read.

Explaining all the reasons I love Ellen C. Maze's "Rabbit: Chasing Beth Rider," without any spoilers, is almost impossible because, although the novel reads like any fast-paced and exciting story of suspense, the underlying themes and symbolism are much more complex.

The unique premise of this novel alone - of a fiction author who, unknowingly, writes the truth about and suggests the possibility of salvation for the creature known to most human beings as the vampire (though not known as such to this race of beings themselves, we learn) - was enough to fascinate me and draw me into the story. Many other factors, however, impressed me and made it a story that really touched me on a deeper level.

First, the character of Beth, who in the beginning of the story has no idea why she's been made a target, is a kind of archetype for all human beings, each of whom have an individual role to play in God's plan, even when they are unaware of that role or don't realize at all that their daily decisions and actions are part of that design. Beth must learn, as all hopefully one day do, that what she had considered the gift of her talent, leading her to a particular career path, was, in fact, divine inspiration leading to a much more vital role. Further, the symbolism of a fiction writer whose creative work is the inspiration which can change the lives and spiritual destinies of so many is a great testament to the power of the written word and how what writers write can influence and transform another, for better or for worse. The deeper symbolism, that this is exactly how God transforms man - through His Word - is more significant still.

Over and over throughout the novel, I was struck by how much "Rabbit" reminded me of a parable. While, on the surface, the author seems to be simply telling a fascinating story with a moral theme - because these ideas are not presented in a systematically theological manner meant for scholars, but instead like one of those intriguing folklore tales listeners of any age can understand and enjoy - delving into deeper layers of the story offers an even more beautiful message of redemption, pointing toward fundamental truths about the love and mercy of God, the value of human life and the lengths to which God will go to bring each of His creatures back to Him.

While indisputably Christian fiction, I believe any reader who appreciates an original, well-written and inspirational supernatural story will love and be touched by this unique vampire novel. Highly recommended reading.
DarK-LiGht
Beth Rider, an ordinary Christian woman of extraordinary faith, writes vampire novels. Successful ones. So successful, in fact, that the Rakum, a race of wraiths/vampires, are now reading them and turning toward God. And a certain Rakum Elder can't allow that.

Maze has created a new, wholly original kind of vampire story. Her world is intricate and vivid, with a history that stretches back thousands of years (I love how the Old Testament is woven into the plot). It is populated by the ancient Rakum, Rabbits (humans who have been marked, in a particularly frightening way, by Rakum), Cows (a demeaning but accurate term for the humans labeled as such), Elders and brethren, masters and their pups.

The book will hook you in the prologue: A Rakum hunts a Rabbit named Schaffer and toys with him--as a cat toys with a mouse before killing it. At this point you don't know who Schaffer is or how he's been marked as a Rabbit, but you feel his terror and sense that when he says he's "in hell," he's right. You won't want to put the book down.

And if you're wondering whether vampire novels and a Christian worldview are compatible, the answer, with this book at least, is a big yes.