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by Timothy George
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Churches & Church Leadership
  • Author:
    Timothy George
  • ISBN:
    0830829490
  • ISBN13:
    978-0830829491
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    IVP Academic (October 6, 2011)
  • Pages:
    270 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Churches & Church Leadership
  • Language:
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    1340 kb
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    1563 kb
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    1530 kb
  • Rating:
    4.4
  • Votes:
    143
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This is the theme of Timothy George’s engaging history, Reading Scripture with the Reformers

This is the theme of Timothy George’s engaging history, Reading Scripture with the Reformers.

Reading scripture with the reformers/Timothy George. p. cm. Includes bibliographical references and index. ISB 978-0-8308-2949-1 (pb. alk. paper) 1. BibleCriticism, interpretation, et. istory16th century.

Timothy F. George, founding dean of Beeson Divinity School, has just published a new book: Reading Scripture with the Reformers. Downers Grove, Illinois: IVP Academic, 2011. Dr. George's book, Reading Scripture with the Reformers, is a good introduction to that project. More than that, it is a good survey of the Reformation. And in addition to that, it is an invitation to us to engage in, and to continue, the Reformation project today.

In Reading Scripture with the Reformers, Timothy George takes readers through the exciting events of the sixteenth century, showing how this dynamic period was instigated by a fresh return to the Scriptures

In Reading Scripture with the Reformers, Timothy George takes readers through the exciting events of the sixteenth century, showing how this dynamic period was instigated by a fresh return to the Scriptures.

Timothy George reveals how the sixteenth century's revolution in theological thinking was fueled by a fresh return to the Scriptures. This book shows how the key figures of the Reformation read and interpreted Scripture, and how their thought was shaped by what they read. We are invited to see what the church today can learn from the fathers of the Reformation, and how these figures offer a model of reading, praying and.

We ought to read Scripture the way Luther and Calvin did by Timothy George March 2011

We ought to read Scripture the way Luther and Calvin did by Timothy George March 2011. For the reformers the Bible was a treasure trove of divine wisdom to be heard, read, marked, learned, and inwardly digested, as the Book of Common Prayer’s collect for the second Sunday in Advent puts it, to the end that we may embrace, and ever hold fast, the blessed hope of everlasting life, which thou has given us in our Savior Jesus. The father of modern hermeneutics, Schleiermacher defined religion as the feeling of absolute dependence and understood Scripture as a detailed expression of the faith that satisfies our need to feel a sense of absolute dependence.

This book is thus somewhat of an apology, written by an evangelical to evangelicals, for the value-indeed, the necessity-of reading scripture with the Reformers. It was, according to George, in the Reformation that scripture was returned to its proper place at the center of Christian life-"The Protestant Reformation was a revolution in the original scientific sense of that: the return of a body in orbit to its original position" (p. 17/).

George establishes the context for their work by describing the spiritual climate of their time. Then he profiles each reformer, providing a picture of their theology that does justice to the scope of their involvement in the reforming effort

George establishes the context for their work by describing the spiritual climate of their time. Then he profiles each reformer, providing a picture of their theology that does justice to the scope of their involvement in the reforming effort. George details the valuable contributions these men made to issues historically considered pillars of the Christian faith: Scripture, Jesus Christ, salvation, the church, and last things.

Timothy George (born 9 January 1950) is an American theologian and journalist. He is the dean of Beeson Divinity School at Samford University and has been the dean since the school's inception in 1988. He also serves as a fellow for The Center for Baptist Renewal.

In Reading Scripture with the Reformers, Timothy George takes readers through the exciting events of the sixteenth century, showing how this dynamic period was instigated by a fresh return to the Scriptures. George immerses us in the world of the Reformation, its continuities with the ancient and medieval church, and its dramatic upheavals and controversies. Most of all, he uncovers the significant way that the Bible shaped the minds and hearts of the reformers. This book shows how the key figures of the Reformation read and interpreted Scripture, and how their thought was shaped by what they read. We are invited to see what the church today can learn from the fathers of the Reformation, and how these figures offer a model of reading, praying and living out the Scriptures.

saafari
I noticed this work on Amazon in 2012, and decided to recently check it out for myself. Though of a manageable size, Reading Scripture with the Reformers contains innumerable helpful insights. For example, the revered Reformers, unlike most modern evangelicals, valued the writings of early church Fathers and various medieval thinkers in seeking to understand Scripture better. John Calvin, writing many years before the "life of the mind" became a popular concept, noted the value of Scripture to combat the idol-producing tendencies of human thinking. Readers also learn that Luther stressed the use of pictures for the instruction of children and the illiterate as invaluable in communicating Gospel truths. We further discover that, though the self-praising Erasmus deserves some accolades, the Dutch scholar failed to master Hebrew, publish Scripture in a common language, or adequately address the issue of man's sin. In addition, we find how Zwingli aimed to be more biblical than Luther by pruning worship of ceremonies and other practices unsupported by Scripture.

This text has further, unexpected insights as well. We're introduced to Petrarch's concept of the "historical imagination", which enabled the masses to enter into literature in a radical new way. In addition, readers learn how Lorenzo Valla, in the fifteenth century, paved the way for others to seek more accurate translations of Greek texts. Further, we find that the early reformers valued the role of Jesus' mother Mary a good deal more than their kinsmen would today. Also, readers discover how the earliest Baptists had a high level of appreciation for the historic Christian creeds. Finally, we learn that modern hermeneutics owes more to the Enlightenment than to the Reformation.

In Reading Scripture with the Reformers, Dr. George has produced an awesome text for anyone serious about their evangelical heritage. In addition to those cited above, numerous other personalities and thoughts are brought forth throughout this work. I simply cannot recommend it enough.
Undeyn
While I was doing a research on “Exegesis and Tradition” for a class about “Scripture and Doctrine” in seminary, I learned about a thesis I needed to quote in an essay I was writing. I just knew that David C. Steinmetz published a compilation he edited on 10 theses, but I wanted to know any original source from where I could reference that particular thesis I wanted to quote.
Long story short, I found this book with a very satisfactory explanation about the source I needed to quote were that thesis was, and I bought it to research on this topic. It was very useful.
Rias
OK. So why should I care what men who lived centuries ago believed?

The "imperialism of the present" would tell me they are irrelevant. It would, however, also blind me to the benefit of those who have traveled the road of faith before me. In Reading Scripture with the Reformers, Timothy George argues there is legitimate and substantial benefit in understanding the Scriptures through the eyes of the Reformers.

George guides the reader through the twists and turns of the Reformation. Along the tour he introduces the leading (often little-known) figures of this period. Their distinct and occasionally conflicting approaches to the Scriptures provide the thematic understanding of its history.

What becomes evident through this historical excursion is the centrality of Scripture to this era. From leader to layman, Protestant to Catholic, saint to sinner, new-found access to the Bible opened up opportunities and influences. The author shows the influence of what the Reformers read, how they interpreted their reading, and how their influence shaped how subsequent generations viewed Scripture.

The contemporary church has much to learn from those who have journeyed ahead of us. For those seeking to explore the benefits of this section of the road, Reading Scripture with the Reformers is an excellent guide-map.
Doktilar
Dr. Timothy F. George, founding dean of Beeson Divinity School, has just published a new book:

Reading Scripture with the Reformers. Downers Grove, Illinois: IVP Academic, 2011. 269 pp.

It is as good a statement of the project of the Reformation of which I am aware. What did the Reformers do? They read the Bible. They read the Bible with new energy, zeal, study, tools, and commitment. And they read the Scripture in such a way not only to learn it and to know it, and not only to teach it to others in the languages of the day, but also and especially to embody it and to live it in the faith and life of the church.

Why did the Reformers read the church fathers? In order to read the Scripture with them.

Why ought we to read the Reformers? In order to read the Scripture with them.

Some time ago the Reformation Commentary on Scripture series was announced. Now it has begun to be published. It is a way to read Scripture with the Reformers and particularly to learn from their commentaries that are not otherwise easily available.

Dr. George's book, Reading Scripture with the Reformers, is a good introduction to that project. More than that, it is a good survey of the Reformation. And in addition to that, it is an invitation to us to engage in, and to continue, the Reformation project today.

I think you will find this book personally enjoyable and edifying. I think you will also find it good and helpful for church officers and adult study classes as a guide to the aim and purpose of the Reformation, to what it means to be a Reformed church today, and to building up the content and strength of their faith today.

In a day when the church is sorely tempted to deny the authority of the Scripture and when some opine that there is no right or wrong interpretation of Scripture (which is another way of saying that it has no authority over us but instead lies under the supposedly higher authority of individual readings), this book is a word we need read, to hear, and to share.

Dr. James C. Goodloe IV, Executive Director
Foundation for Reformed Theology