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by Lee Martin McDonald
Download The Formation of the Christian Biblical Canon fb2
Churches & Church Leadership
  • Author:
    Lee Martin McDonald
  • ISBN:
    0687132932
  • ISBN13:
    978-0687132935
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Abingdon Pr (December 1, 1988)
  • Pages:
    205 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Churches & Church Leadership
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1318 kb
  • ePUB format
    1174 kb
  • DJVU format
    1280 kb
  • Rating:
    4.7
  • Votes:
    745
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McDonald's "The Formation of Christian Biblical Canon" should be on every bookshelf.

McDonald's "The Formation of Christian Biblical Canon" should be on every bookshelf. Many will be surprised to learn there were several different canons in use by early Christians, and that the Scriptures of the apostolic era were more inclusive than those ultimately selected for inclusion in modern Bibles. 7 people found this helpful.

Lee Martin McDonald is President Emeritus and Professor of New Testament Studies Emeritus of Acadia Divinity School, Nova Scotia . The book is divided into 8 chapters that seek to explain the formation of the Christian canon.

Lee Martin McDonald is President Emeritus and Professor of New Testament Studies Emeritus of Acadia Divinity School, Nova Scotia and Adjunct Professor of New Testament at Fuller Theological Seminary. He serves as Scholar in Residence for the American Baptist Churches of Los Angeles and the American Baptist Congregations of the Southwest and Hawaii.

A biblical canon or canon of scripture is a set of texts (or "books") which a particular religious community regards as authoritative scripture. The English word "canon" comes from the Greek κανών, meaning "rule" or "measuring stick". Christians became the first to use the term in reference to scripture, but Eugene Ulrich regards the idea as Jewish. Most of the canons listed below are considered by adherents "closed" (.

He lives in Mesa, Arizona. Books by Lee Martin McDonald

Carefully documented and written in sterling prose, Lee Martin McDonald uses a lifetime of scholarship to tell .

Carefully documented and written in sterling prose, Lee Martin McDonald uses a lifetime of scholarship to tell one of history's most remarkable stories-the story of the Judeo-Christian Bible. From the ancient texts of the Pentateuch, to the development of the LXX, to the Dead Sea Scrolls, to the Gospels and the rest of the New Testament, McDonald's work educates, enriches, and edifies.

The Christian biblical canons are the books Christians regard as divinely inspired and which constitute a Christian Bible

The Christian biblical canons are the books Christians regard as divinely inspired and which constitute a Christian Bible. Which books constituted the Christian biblical canons of both the Old and New Testament was generally established by the 5th century, despite some scholarly disagreements, for the ancient undivided Church (the Catholic and Eastern Orthodox traditions, before the East–West Schism).

The author, Lee Martin Mc- Donald, Minister of the Baptist Church, was president and professor of New Testament Studies .

The author, Lee Martin Mc- Donald, Minister of the Baptist Church, was president and professor of New Testament Studies at Acadia Divinity College and Dean of Theology for Acadia University (Nova Scotia, Canada).

It represents a fresh attempt to understand some of the many perplexing questions related to the origins and canonicity of the Bible. Пользовательский отзыв - aevaughn - LibraryThing. A good overview of how the OT/NT canons developed in Christianity (and in Judaism for the OT as well)

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"Lee McDonald has written a lucid and accessible account of the formation of the Christian Bible, clearly marshalling the major evidence, working through the main problems, and reaching persuasive conclusions. Treating separately the canons of the Old and New Testaments, he provides translations of most of the ancient primary sources, good summaries of scholarly debates, and a useful guide to the extensive scholarly literature on the subject. This book will find an appreciative readership among students, pastors, and inquiring laypersons."--Harry Gamble professor and chair of religious studies University of Virginia "This is a remarkable book in that it tackles the question of the formation of the Christian biblical canon in its full sense, that is, both testaments. . . . McDonald has produced a timely study, considerably improved in the sections of the OT canon and generally more comprehensive for both testaments than in his first edition, that should command wide attention for years to come. He has, in my opinion, come to the right conclusions on the essential questions."--James A. Sanders professor of biblical and intertestamental studies, School of Theology at Claremont "I am willing to endorse The Formation of the Christian Biblical Canon with great enthusiasm. Quite simply, it is the finest introduction to the biblical canon available for the student. In particular, I like two things about this second edition: 1) McDonald has written a book with the student in mind. Clearly, he is a teacher writing for students; he knows their questions and struggles well and makes a serious effort to respond to them with rigor and clarity. 2) McDonald is aware of the important theological and hermeneutical issues at stake in his discussion of the biblical canon."--Robert W. Wall, professor of biblical studies, Seattle Pacific University

Thabel
This book is a must read for any Bible student. It shows us, which books do not belong in the Bible, because they contradict the Torah. This book shows us, which books do not belong in the Bible, because they do not glorify Our Lord.
Uste
Excellent, thorough study of the gradual process of selection of which of the numerous both Jewish and Christian texts would come to be
considered scripture and included in the Bible. He doesn't just say, "Eusebius took this position" or "Tertullian advocated for that book's inclusion or exclusion." He quotes the relevant writings of these people. He makes a number of interesting points. For example, in the time of the writing of the New Testament books, the canon of the Old Testament was not yet defined. So some books not now in the Bible were quoted by New Testament authors as scripture. The books which are included in Catholic Bibles but not Protestant were considered scripture for many centuries of Christianity (and still are by Catholics and Orthodox) since they were in the Greek Old Testament (the Septuagint). Protestants have followed Luther and other Reformation leaders who wanted only the books in the Hebrew scriptures. Yet the books to be included or excluded from the Hebrew canon were not decided until the 4th century or so, around the time the New Testament canon was being determined. Many other interesting insights. Highly recommended.
Yojin
McDonald's book provides an excellent overview of the topic at hand. Reads a lot like a textbook, which I suppose is how it's often used. He does a very good job of bringing in all appropriate evidence, but staying very methodical in his assessments and in getting his points across. You'll probably wish for more depth in some areas, less in others, but this book should at the very least point you in the right direction toward more in-depth research.
Perspective is always important when you're talking about books on this subject. The field seems to be dominated by highbrow apoligists (like Metzger and Bruce), whose glossing over of problematic (to the orthodoxy) canonical issues makes for limpwristed scholarship, or by the more deconstructionist liberal school of the Jesus Seminar and such. Motives and scholarship often become difficult to differentiate. McDonald, however, is a Baptist minister, and a scholar, and, in my opinion gleaned from this book, he wears both hats with aplomb and distinction. Hard core fundamentalists (like a previous reviewer) may find his conclusions troubling. I'll let McDonald respond in his own words, from the last paragraph of his "Final Thoughts":
"My aim in this study has not been to destroy the church's Bible, as if that could be done, but to bring some light to the often dimly lit corridors that led to the formation of our Bible and, in that process, to remind the reader of the true canon of faith for the church: our Lord Jesus Christ. The Bible is still the church's book without which the Christian faith would be a blur. I believe that a careful study of the biblical message in its historical environment and in the community of faith where it was first acknowledged as scripture and canon will prove invaluable to the church. Lessons learned from this approach will not only free the church from inappropriate loyalties but also will help the church to focus more clearly on the true object and final authority of its faith: Jesus Christ."
Galubel
McDonald's "The Formation of Christian Biblical Canon" should be on every bookshelf. McDonald has provided a well-documented history of how several OT and NT canons were filtered before the presently accepted canons came into being after several centuries. Many will be surprised to learn there were several different canons in use by early Christians, and that the Scriptures of the apostolic era were more inclusive than those ultimately selected for inclusion in modern Bibles.
Shakar
the best out there for the topic
Stan
Aside from a few howlers, this book is a balanced and thorough investigation to the context and mindset of the church that formed the present biblical canon. McDonald interacts with the doyens of biblical studies and their best arguments. He is always cross-examining weak arguments and asking questions that many evangelicals have ignored (or prayed their students didn't ask).

The notion of Scripture as "canon" is a tricky one. In our post-enlightenment era, we think of any mention of a list of writings a proof that ancient cultures have the same view of canon as 21st century Protestants. There are several problems with this line of reasoning: 1) with the possible exception of Josephus, ancient men usually defined a canon not as a list of writings; and 2) there are numerous lists of books in ancient sources (and the bible) that are not recognized as proto-canons.

This leads into what will be McDonald's thesis: Jesus is the canon! The early Christians' faith was not in a codified set of writings but in the Risen Lord. The message of this Risen Lord was passed down from the apostles to the bishops to the elders: it was tradition. This tradition testified of Christ.

This leads to McDonald's next point: he takes aim at Roger Beckwith's thesis that the OT Scriptures at the earliest were defined a few centuries before Christ and at their latest at the council of Jamnia in AD 90. Many point to an earlier dating of OT canonization because of claims by 2 Maccabees that prophecy had ceased in Israel, presumably pointing to the last prophet around the time of Malachi. But as McDonald points out, entrance to the canon was not a matter of whether or not a prophet was inspired, but whether this particular writing was used in liturgy (53).

McDonald's most pointed question is that if the Church received a completed OT canon it nowhere identified it. If, as Beckwith says, it was so obvious and universal and did not need to identify it, this is a huge argument from silence and assumes a lot of what it needs to prove. True, the church did receive the story of Israel and was likely familiar with most of the present OT canon, but that does not mean that ALL of the OT canon was there. This is yet to be proven, and McDonald scores huge points on this issue.

Conclusions:

McDonald makes a few howlers in his final chapter. He stared modernity in the face, and like all men of Fuller Seminary, suffered a failure of nerve. He blames the Bible for the continuance of slavery and not speaking clearly about civil rights and ecological irresponsibility. Umm...yeah.

But he does make other good points.

"Should the Church be limited to an OT canon to which Jesus and his disciples were clearly not limited? Also, we have seen that the final limits of the OT canon used by Protestants was in part shaped by a Judaism in polemic against the Church" (255).

McDonald, although coming from flawed presuppositions (and certainly to wrong conclusions), asks a very loaded, very poignant question:

"Those who would argue for the infallibility or the inerrancy of scripture logically should also claim the same infallibility for the churches in the fourth and fifth centuries, whose decisions and historical circumstances left us with our present canon. This is apparently what would be required if we were to only acknowledge the twenty-seven NT books that were set forth by the church in that context. Was the church in the Nicene and post-Nicene eras infallible in its decisions or not" (256)?