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by Matthew Lickona
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Christian Living
  • Author:
    Matthew Lickona
  • ISBN:
    0829424717
  • ISBN13:
    978-0829424713
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Loyola Press (January 1, 2007)
  • Pages:
    288 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Christian Living
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1730 kb
  • ePUB format
    1243 kb
  • DJVU format
    1680 kb
  • Rating:
    4.6
  • Votes:
    633
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Swimming with Scapulars book.

Swimming with Scapulars book. Matthew Lickona has the blind faith that is the luxury of those who benefit from the system. He admits that he doesn't "understand the Church's teaching on birth control," but then goes on to say, "But what's it matter if I understand it?

SWIMMING WITH SCAPULARS is Matthew Lickona's thoughtful, well-written, and sometimes humorous apologia of a husband and father in his thirties, seeking to live a Catholic life in a world that often seems to eschew both his Faith and his commitment to it. There is not much written o. .

SWIMMING WITH SCAPULARS is Matthew Lickona's thoughtful, well-written, and sometimes humorous apologia of a husband and father in his thirties, seeking to live a Catholic life in a world that often seems to eschew both his Faith and his commitment to it. There is not much written or published about his generation's ideas about faith and how it is to be lived, so it is delightful that someone of the same generation as my own two sons can articulate what Catholicism means on a personal level.

Swimming with Scapulars is a modern-day, Catholic, coming-of-age story that takes its author from the austere Catholicism of his Irish-French family in upstate New York to the exotic spiritual tapestry of Southern California

Swimming with Scapulars is a modern-day, Catholic, coming-of-age story that takes its author from the austere Catholicism of his Irish-French family in upstate New York to the exotic spiritual tapestry of Southern California. It is the story of the formation of an ardent young believer who is painfully honest about his spiritual shortcomings ( In times of suffering, I look first to myself. God is the backup, to be called upon when I find myself insufficient. yet who finds consuming joy in receiving the Eucharist and embracing the ancient treasures of the faith

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Before I even cracked the cover of Matthew Lickona's new book Swimming With Scapulars: True Confessions Of A Young Catholic (Loyola Press . Swimming With Scapulars is the story of one young man's journey of faith.

Before I even cracked the cover of Matthew Lickona's new book Swimming With Scapulars: True Confessions Of A Young Catholic (Loyola Press, April 2005, hardcover, 278 pages), I found myself intrigued. Gratefully, having now read and re-read the book in its entirety, I'll say I was not disappointed. The faith involved happens to be Catholicism, but the appeal of this book is not found in its theology, but rather in the glimpse it gives us into the development of spirituality in this young man.

Swimming with Scapulars: True Confessions of a Young Catholic. Cradle Catholic husband and father Matthew Lickona honestly and disarmingly explores a full array of issues through his own spiritual lens. He weighs in on the Church scandals, family planning debates, how to treat people falling through the welfare net, how best to witness his faith, the place of sacramentals (hence the titular scapulars) in a modern Catholic's life, the variations in Mass celebration "styles" from church to church, the definition of Catholic literature, trying to live family life by Christ's lights

In Lickona’s "true confessions," we are introduced to a unique and singular voice, but one that is emblematic of a new generation of believers who combine a premodern faith with a postmodern sensibility.

In Lickona’s "true confessions," we are introduced to a unique and singular voice, but one that is emblematic of a new generation of believers who combine a premodern faith with a postmodern sensibility. Swimming with Scapulars is a modern-day, Catholic, coming-of-age story that takes its author from the austere Catholicism of his Irish-French family in upstate New York to the exotic spiritual tapestry of Southern California. yet who finds consuming joy in receiving the Eucharist and embracing the ancient treasures of the faith.

Swimming With Scapulars. True Confessions of a Young Catholic. Published December 30, 2006 by Loyola Press. Catholics, Biography.

Matthew Lickona has been a staff writer for the San Diego Reader, a weekly newspaper, since 1995. In 2005, Loyola Press published his memoir Swimming with Scapulars: True Confessions of a Young Catholic. From 1999-2008, he wrote Crush, an interview-driven column about wine and the wine industry. He also writes regular cover stories for the paper. The book chronicled his efforts to engage the Catholic faith of his youth, and to make it more fully his own.

Meet Matthew Lickona, a thirty-something wine columnist, sometime cartoonist, avid moviegoer, fan of alternative rock, and wonderfully talented writer. He is also a devoutly religious young man (“I am a Roman Catholic, baptized as an infant and raised in the faith, a faith which holds the exemplary and redemptive suffering of Jesus Christ at its core.” ) who fasts during Lent, leads his family in prayer every day, and wears a scapular—a medieval amulet said to protect the wearer from harm. In Lickona’s “true confessions,” we are introduced to a unique and singular voice, but one that is emblematic of a new generation of believers who combine a premodern faith with a postmodern sensibility. Swimming with Scapulars is a modern-day, Catholic, coming-of-age story that takes its author from the austere Catholicism of his Irish-French family in upstate New York to the exotic spiritual tapestry of Southern California. It is the story of the formation of an ardent young believer who is painfully honest about his spiritual shortcomings (“In times of suffering, I look first to myself. God is the backup, to be called upon when I find myself insufficient.”), yet who finds consuming joy in receiving the Eucharist and embracing “the ancient treasures of the faith.” Lickona doesn’t mind that many of his secular friends and acquaintances regard him as a religious fanatic. As he writes, “Perhaps, coming from a fanatic, the message of God’s love will regain some of its wonderful outrageousness. ‘Listen. I have a secret. I eat God, and I have his life in me. It’s the best thing in the world.’”


Ariurin
Wonderful stories, poignant and engaging. Lickona puts together a series of milestone events important in a young man's life we can all relate to.
Ichalote
Unabashedly honest reflections on the author's personal faith journey and his desire to evangelize those around him and live a faithful life. Matthew Lickona is very direct about his daily struggles and lack of perfection, as well as his earnest desire to live his life according to the will of God instead of secular influences which surround us constantly. Fresh, easy to read, and inspiring for those of us who, like him, are far from perfect but work daily to draw closer to God.
Уou ll never walk alone
Funny and relatable! Very easy read.
Frlas
SWIMMING WITH SCAPULARS is Matthew Lickona's thoughtful, well-written, and sometimes humorous apologia of a husband and father in his thirties, seeking to live a Catholic life in a world that often seems to eschew both his Faith and his commitment to it. There is not much written or published about his generation's ideas about faith and how it is to be lived, so it is delightful that someone of the same generation as my own two sons can articulate what Catholicism means on a personal level. When reading about Lickona's obvious joy at being on the campus of a Catholic college and his feelings of belonging, I wondered why this young man had not been a student in Catholic schools prior to this! Is Cortland or Boston lacking in Catholic institutions at the grade and high school levels? I doubt it, so what is the reason why he did not have this educational experience at an earlier age? He so obviously relished it.

I am of an age where I recall firsthand the "two and three rosary" Masses - liturgies where many of the Faithful in the pews said their rosaries while the priest, turned away from the people, intoned the order of the Mass and the altar boy responded in Latin, which neither he nor many in the pews, other than those of us who studied Latin, could comprehend. Believe me, it was not the soaring and majestic Mass that Lickona would like to believe it was, except on rare holydays. Mass in the vernacular - the everyday language of the Faithful - may not have the melodic rhythm and cadence of Latin or the drama at holydays - but it does provide a means for more-inclusive worship and spirit of community than the Latin Mass ever did in this country and other nations around the globe. (It is no wonder that theater arose out of religious practice if you have ever seen a Tridentine High Mass!) Religious ritual is a community act, including the Eucharist, and it is just as fitting and proper that it be in the language of today's community as it was for the denizens of the Roman Empire in the early centuries of the Church. Indeed, there is ample room for improvement in liturgy and music today, but I am confident that that will come over time. "Tantum Ergo" and "Pange Lingua" did not spring forth in the first thousand years of liturgy; nor was St. Ephraim, to whom we owe the inclusion of singing at Mass, loathe to craft his hymns from the common ditties of his day. I would personally like to see "Dies Irae" sung in Advent and Lent rather than simply being assigned to All Soul's Day; but I would want it in English (perhaps John Newton's version), so everyone could appreciate and reflect on what it says. Don't be too rough on the St. Louis Jesuits, Matthew. They are the Thomas of Celano's of their day!! By the end of this one thousand year interval, the Faithful will probably be looking back longingly to "On Eagles Wings" also.

I would have liked to have seen more faith in action discussed in this book. Belief without action is lacking. I applaud that Matthew has read the Church Fathers at TAC; but I think he may benefit by exploring and studying Congar, de Lubac, Raymond Brown, Richard McBrien, Cardinal Newman, Archbishop Quinn and the documents of Vatican II also. One need not be limited in a Catholic reading circle to reading Chesterton's Father Brown when Greene's THE POWER AND THE GLORY is still on the book shelves. Continue wearing your brown scapular, Matthew (Have you ever considered a 5-fold one?) because I will continue to wear my Miraculous Medal - a true commitment - no matter what the world thinks of my religious practices. Reading this book makes me grateful for my sixteen years of Catholic education and my Italian family's inclusion of religion in everyday life from food to celebration. I suspect that what we had as natural is what Matthew Lickona would like to experience.
Fenrikasa
Very good book. Purchased for a Catholic high school library as a donation.
Minha
This is a great book. It reminded me of growing up and of my mother, a devout Catholic who is no longer with us. Kudos to Matthew for refreshing my memory about what the Catholic church is really about and about his honest look at his own faith.
The Apotheoses of Lacspor
great for catholics that want a reminder of traditional catholic education that they forgot. refreshing. great writting. life changing. get yourself a scapular.
I really encourage others to read this memoir of a likable young father living as a Catholic in--and now and again, of--the world. The style is crisp and easy; the anecdotes endearing; the faith lively. I read this book as one who is a 32-year-old scapular-wearing parent of several children herself, with, like the author, a great books education and some experience living the good life, too. I think Mr. Lickona provides excellent insight into the life of such Catholics -- the struggles, the priorities, the joys. As a female reader I would have preferred more reflection on the life of the family, but there is still a great deal to feast on for a relatively short book.

My only real concern about the book is its depiction of Natural Family Planning as a wonderful, albeit challenging, practice all faithful Catholics should follow. The problem that most orthodox Catholics fail to admit is that this is still a "birth control" way of life, just natural rather than artificial, but still a long way from supernatural. (I say this as one who used to cheer NFP.) NFP is helpful when truly grave reason exists. (Recall that denying the "marital debt" to one's spouse without serious reason used to be considered a mortal sin - not because a man should be able to treat his wife like a concubine but because the Church recognized the sins of lust that can threaten his soul if his passions are not properly curbed within the marriage. Since then we've gotten more concupiscent as a culture, not less). But Mr. Lickona, like most well-intentioned NFP-promoters, doesn't make those distinctions clear, or come clean that NFP is not the Church's tradition, but only our compromise with the culture of death.

Sure, this is a memoir, not a theological treatise, and the author is only giving his experience, and it is generally a funny, endearing and insightful one. Still, I look forward to Mr. Lickona's next book, which I hope will contemplate this topic further. Until then, fellow readers, enjoy this book and share it with others.