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by Ken Wilson
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Christian Living
  • Author:
    Ken Wilson
  • ISBN:
    0849920019
  • ISBN13:
    978-0849920011
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Thomas Nelson Inc (May 18, 2010)
  • Pages:
    192 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Christian Living
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1999 kb
  • ePUB format
    1611 kb
  • DJVU format
    1709 kb
  • Rating:
    4.2
  • Votes:
    594
  • Formats:
    lrf rtf azw txt


Wilson points out that Genesis 1 draws us into prayer by introducing us to Time’s sacred rhythms. Besides what he provides throughout his text, he does have an Appendix entitled Ten Practices to Explore New Realms in Prayer

Wilson points out that Genesis 1 draws us into prayer by introducing us to Time’s sacred rhythms. Besides what he provides throughout his text, he does have an Appendix entitled Ten Practices to Explore New Realms in Prayer. The book could be of added assistance to those who have heard about all the wondrous new brain science relating to how our brains are actually plastic and moldable--such as explained more technically, with application to spiritual practices, for instance, in books by Dr. Caroline Leaf--and he relates this with a view toward the deliberate.

Mystically Wired: Exploring New Realms In Prayer. We are designed to make connections to God through prayer in more ways than we can imagine. Prayer can be so much more than a simple conversation. It can be a wordless connection with God, a step beyond the boundary of the separated self.

Ken Wilson tells us how. Praise for Mystically Wired: Smart, savvy, candid, credible, unafraid, self-effacing, and shot through with passionate love of Jesus. yes, hands down, this is the best book on prayer that I have ever read

Ken Wilson tells us how. yes, hands down, this is the best book on prayer that I have ever read. Phyllis Tickle, Compiler, The Words of Jesus: A Gospel of the Sayings of Our Lord I confess, I don’t normally like books on prayer, but Mystically Wired is a big exception. While this book is incredibly practical, I was routinely blown away by the intuitive genius of Ken’s view and application of prayer. Page after page, thinking I knew what was next, I was.

Mystically Wired book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Mystically Wired: Exploring New Realms in Prayer as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. We are designed to make connections to God through prayer in more.

We are designed to make connections to God through prayer in more ways than we can imagine. It can be a way to listen to the silence. And it can be learned. We can learn how to pray in ways we never thought possible. Praise for Mystically Wired . I confess, I don’t normally like books on prayer, but Mystically Wired is a big exception. Phyllis Tickle, Compiler, The Words of Jesus: A Gospel of the Sayings of Our Lord. While this book is incredibly practical, I was routinely blown away by the intuitive genius of Ken’s view and application of prayer

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Hardback Jacqueline Wilson Books. Jacqueline Wilson Hardback Non-Fiction Books. Hardback Books Forgotten Realms. Hardback Books Ken Follett. Hardback Books Ken Follet. Additional site navigation.

In Part 1 of our look at Mystically Wired: Exploring New Realms in Prayer, we reported that this book is trying to bridge the chasm between science and religion-from the perspective of evangelical Christians. Part 1 also includes a short excerpt from Ken Wilson’s book. TODAY, in Part 2, you’ll meet Ken Wilson and learn that not all evangelical Christians are thrilled with Ken’s efforts. We think this is an important book, packed with great insights for deepening your prayer life. Interview with Ken Wilson on Mystically Wired: Exploring New Realms in Prayer.

You're here Christian Books Index Mystically Wired: Exploring New .

You're here Christian Books Index Mystically Wired: Exploring New Realms In Prayer - eBook. Prayer is one of the most important practices of Christian life, but also one of the most difficult.

In Mystically Wired I have a little section on making a physical space for prayer in your . THIS IS YOUR BRAIN ON RELIGION: Ken Wilson (launched 2010)Remember those ads: This is your brain on drugs.

In Mystically Wired I have a little section on making a physical space for prayer in your home or apartment and keeping t. Mystically Wired. Mystically Wired has blown up my little brain when it comes to understanding how the brain is actually designed to pray. Today, we’re exploring: THIS is your brain on religion! Mystically Wired.

We are designed to make connections to God through prayer in more ways than we can imagine.

Prayer can be so much more than a simple conversation. It can be a wordless connection with God, a step beyond the boundary of the separated self. It can be a way to listen to the silence. And it can be learned. We can learn how to pray in ways we never thought possible. It doesn't take more effort; it takes more understanding.

Wilson's book shows how the brain is designed by God

To calm itselfTo relax into loveTo become increasingly aware of how connected everything is in GodTo experience a deeper intimacy with our creator

Prayer is something that our brains want to do with a little help. Ken Wilson tells us how.

Praisefor Mystically Wired

"Smart,savvy, candid, credible, unafraid, self-effacing, and shotthroughwith passionate love of Jesus . . . yes, hands down, this isthebest book on prayer that I have ever read.

-Phyllis Tickle

Compiler, The Words

of Jesus: A Gospel of the

Sayings of Our Lord

"Iconfess, I don't normally like books on prayer, but MysticallyWiredis a big exception. While this book is incrediblypractical,I wasroutinely blown away by the intuitive genius of Ken's viewandapplication of prayer. Page after page, thinking I knew whatwasnext, I was surprised with fresh insight and unique perspectivesonconnecting with God. Being an evangelist, I was excitedtorealize I could also send this to spiritual friends who don't followJesusas a way to introduce him."

-R. York Moore

National Evangelist

InterVarsity Christian

Fellowship USA

"Itbegan the day Jesus' disciples came to him and asked, 'Lord,teachus to pray.' Ever since, Christ-followers have been wantingtolearn the ways of prayer. Ken Wilson's Mystically Wired isanextraordinarycontribution to that learning tradition. It's a wonderfulreadthat leaves you feeling, 'Yes, this is for me. Yes, I candothis. Yes, it's within reach.'"

-Brian McLaren

Author/Speaker/Activist

"Iwandered away from religion because religion thought it hadallthe answers. Pastor Ken Wilson, though, understands thatlifeand faith are really about having the right questions. If youwantto pray for favors, put this book down now. If you want theanswers,the help here is only partial. But if you're looking for awide-ranginginquiry, and a path that can bring you closer to themystery-withoutthe mumbo-jumbo-delve within."

-Carl Safina

Author, Song for the BlueOcean and The View FromLazy Point

"MysticallyWired was a breath of fresh apologetic airfor me. Iprayand I experience God, and I find fixed hour prayer deeplymeaningful,but this book shows that God made us to do such

thingsand our brain is wired to communicate with God."

-Scot McKnight

Karl A. Olsson Professor in

Religious Studies

North Park University

"Inmy library there are scores of books on prayer-by legendsandmodern guides as well. It is not easy to make a genuine contributiontothis body of literature. But Ken Wilson has done so.MysticallyWired manages to bring together the bestof the sciencesandphilosophies of mind, brain, and consciousness with deepspiritualityand candid personal reflection. While it will happilyfitmy on my shelf, it fits best in a heart yearning to pray."

-Todd Hunter

Anglican Bishop

"KenWilson's new book is fascinating intellectually and engagingspiritually.Its theme is a great discussion starter with Christiansandnon-Christians alike!"

-Dr. Joel C. Hunter

Senior Pastor

Northland, A Church

Distributed


Kardana
From the dozens of books I have read on the topic of prayer, (thought I'd be better at this by now), this is one of the 2 best. Tradition and experience, form and spontaneity, eclectic yet biblical, Wilson draws from Scripture, traditional practices and personal experience to give wise guidance into the life of prayer.
Xurad
What is prayer? What is it for? Why do we do it? Why is it important? What is its objective? Where should it take place? Where does it take place? How do we know when we are successful? How do you do it? Do we go anywhere in particular when we pray? Should we go anywhere in particular when we pray? Why? How? Oh, there are many questions about prayer that we have, and this book gives us some real answers. Gives us some background--how others have thought about prayer and how they prayed and why they prayed. It gives us some background about brain science and how that should encourage us in our praying. It gives us some of the personal experience of the author as he struggled to discover a vital prayer life for himself. It gives us a way of thinking about prayer that opens up the experience and allows it to be an adventure in knowing God. In participating in the communion of saints as they adore God. Allows prayer to be something beyond duty and obligation. Encourages us to understand it as an opportunity to experience God intimately, to open a doorway into the heavenly realms by which we may enter and enjoy God for a time.

This is both a why and a how-to book, fully grounded in Scripture, full of humility and wisdom. Full of suggestions that will help anyone toward a fuller, more joyful encounter with God.
AfinaS
Whether you have been praying for years or for days this book will influence your REAL communication with Jesus.
This book not only engages our minds to intimacy with God, yet also provides additional references and guides on the bottom of several pages that will allow the reader to further explore each view point.
In the final chapter, Ken Wilson boldly challenges us be consumed by God's burning love. In essence, expand our love for God and people.
Nakora
No matter what your Christian denomination is, and no matter whether you are of a Protestant or Catholic orientation, this is an exciting book (I think) that is bound to enlighten and invigorate your life of prayer. It’s well-written, easy to read, spritely, and quite enjoyable.

Ken Wilson, the author, is a Protestant charismatic-evangelical pastor in the Vineyard constellation of churches founded in 1975. (I have to feel that, standing up as he does for “mystical” prayer and having the temerity to put a photo of ancient monastic arches on the cover of his book, he is certainly a Protestant evangelical of great courage! I would imagine that his evangelical confreres might aim a good deal of hostility at him over such a forthright allusion to something relating to typical Roman Catholic practices!) ---(There is very little other reference to Roman Catholicism in the book, however.)

In fact, there are some very negative reviews of the book. After reading some of them, I'm incredulous. No way is this book advocating New Agism! It seems to me that readers who came to that suspicious conclusion are incapable of reading with understanding! Could not identify with so many of the negative reactions to the material. For instance, boredom! And I found much good in the book, and especially in the first half of the book which others seem most to have disliked as compared to the second half. I suppose after publically declaring my liking for this book, I shall be condemned as a heretic by some of my own friends in Christ! But, I will take courage and try to write a good review of this book, very much of which I liked. (I will say, though, that some of the suggestions about where to pray to enhance prayer seemed extraneous since I'd already heard those kinds of suggestions a great deal over the years. And the book did feel like it was dragging on and being too forcibly elongated toward the end.)

Besides showing that scientific brain studies reveal the efficacy of the kind of prayer engaged in by monastic monks and nuns who habitually pray using written prayer books [such as the Psalms], Ken Wilson shows that the traditional “Prayer of the Hours” engaged in by both Roman Catholics and Protestant Episcopelians at intervals during the day was typical of traditional Jewish prayer in the Old Testament, exemplified, for instance, in Daniel’s 3-times-a-day prayer practice. Wilson also reports that during New Testament times, bells sounded throughout the Roman Empire at sunrise, 9 AM, noon, 3 PM, and at sunset and that Jesus and the early Christians prayed the traditional Jewish Hours of Prayer. For instance, the new Christians were gathered at 9 AM when the Holy Spirit was conferred (Acts 2:1, 15). When the first recorded healing took place, John and Peter were walking to the temple for the 3 PM Hour of prayer (Acts 3:1). Peter received his Joppa vision when he was saying his noontime prayers (Acts 10:9). Essentially, this was the most stunning news for me. (Sorry, I can’t seem to locate Wilson’s reference in Scripture to Jesus walking in the temple at a certain daily hour of prayer, which I felt sure that I saw....)

Wilson points out that Genesis 1 “draws us into prayer by introducing us to Time’s sacred rhythms.” Prayer is a way of tending to God “in time,” a way of “marking time with God.” In doing so, we trace neural pathways for God in our brains” and these pathways make easier “our travel toward, alongside, and under God in Time.” Ideally, daily, weekly, and seasonal celebratory prayer times work best, as shown in a study of several different cultures over several thousand years. [There are those who argue that the Jewish seasonal celebrations and God’s designs for their specified times were and still are discernible in God’s arrangement and action of the Heavenly bodies which He meant to mark the spiritual and earthly seasons; and so that concept would coincide well with what Pastor Wilson is saying above.]

Wilson’s own personal experience was that he went through several decades when he thought that informal, conversational, and charismatic prayer was “far superior to the idea of ‘saying our prayers’ with the help of a prayer book.” He judged the prayer traditions of his childhood Episcopal church to be “sorely lacking in vitality---the way you pray when you’ve only got enough spiritual fuel in your tank to go through the motions.” He adds, however: “How very wrong I was.” His great change of mind came when he made “one of the most fruitful discoveries of [his] life,” that being the contents of “The Divine Hours; A Manual for Prayer,” by Phyllis Tickle, a lay minister in the Episcopal Church who apparently arranged the seasonal Hours of Prayer in a convenient, easy-to-follow format. And, importantly, it was from her book Wilson learned that the basic prayer pattern of the Biblical era was at daily set intervals of morning, noon, evening and bedtime. He says that in spite of decades of regular Bible reading, he had somehow missed this fact that the apostles and early Christians practiced the Prayer Hours. (And how many others of us have missed it!)

Wilson suggests ways that the basic principle of interval prayer can be adapted and enhanced in a personal context as well as in the traditional group context. If you can’t pray long prayer sessions, it’s okay to pray only 2 or 3 minutes during your sessions that occur at intervals of the day. There isn’t space in a book review to touch on the many ideas and the information that he brings to light while interweaving supporting remarks about the discoveries of brain science and how to apply them. How to use nature and surroundings to enhance the effect of your prayers, etc.

Although he brings out the essential meanings and meaningfulness in some brain studies, and although he defines his use of the term “wiring” with reference to the brain’s neural structure, Pastor Wilson doesn’t tell much about the technical aspects of how the brain functions. He does tell very enthusiastically about how his own prayer life has been resurrected to vital new life, and I would say that he provides here a terrifically good workbook, although not in workbook form. Besides what he provides throughout his text, he does have an Appendix entitled “Ten Practices to Explore New Realms in Prayer.”

The book could be of added assistance to those who have heard about all the wondrous new brain science relating to how our brains are actually “plastic” and moldable---such as explained more technically, with application to spiritual practices, for instance, in books by Dr. Caroline Leaf---and he relates this with a view toward the deliberate building of more abundant and beneficent alive and effective prayer forces through our discipline of thought, meditation, and prayer at intervals throughout the day. The great and helpful thing is that with reference to concrete written material, the inarticulate person will have materials to use that help provide meaningful words of prayer. The greatest part of his book deals with VARIOUS ways by which one can pray in accord with the Prayer Hours concept.

I find that Ken Wilson’s book affords great relief and great practical help for me with problems in prayer because after I finish my list of specific intercessory prayers for people and situations, I tend to become inarticulate; I have trouble formulating what I want to say besides a simple prayer for “Help!” Interestingly enough, even before I was drawn to read and find out what Wilson’s book had to say about so-called “mystical” prayer, I had begun to find that having some traditional, routine written or memorized prayers, which some Christians would denigrate with contempt) was actually very helpful and fruitful for me.

Even if you can’t accept the rightness of the “Prayer of the Hours” concept, you can still get great new prayer energy from reading this book. It’s terrifically GOOD!