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by Will Samson,Shane Claiborne
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Christian Living
  • Author:
    Will Samson,Shane Claiborne
  • ISBN:
    0781445426
  • ISBN13:
    978-0781445429
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    David C. Cook; New edition (March 1, 2009)
  • Pages:
    176 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Christian Living
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1457 kb
  • ePUB format
    1783 kb
  • DJVU format
    1184 kb
  • Rating:
    4.3
  • Votes:
    347
  • Formats:
    docx mobi mbr azw


How much is enough? In an age of conspicuous consumption-of designer sunglasses, jeweled cell phones.

How much is enough? In an age of conspicuous consumption-of designer sunglasses, jeweled cell phones. So how welcome is Will Samson's new book Enough: Contentment in an Age of Excess, which goes right to the heart of modern economics, namely that "we are people consumed by stuff" (notably, this point is missing from almost all conversation about "the economy"). Further, as Samson goes out of his way to make clear that he understands this problem to be theological as much (or more) than just cultural, he posits that "we are not consumed by an incarnational God the same way we are consumed by stuff.

Will Samson is good at opening thoughtful dialogue; a recent conversation was about social justice. In Enough, his latest wide-ranging, insightful book, Will addresses the idea of finding contentment in this age of excess.

In Enough Will Samson explores the negative aspects of living in a culture of excess and then how to live trusting God for our contentment. In an age of conspicuous consumption-of designer sunglasses, jeweled cell phones, and -foot homes-is it possible to be content?

In Enough Will Samson explores the negative aspects of living in a culture of excess and then how to live trusting God for our contentment. He offers life and peace no earthly thing can supply. Come and experience the abundance God offers, and find He is, in fact, enough. In an age of conspicuous consumption-of designer sunglasses, jeweled cell phones, and -foot homes-is it possible to be content? In a society where children spend more time worrying about their weight than their grades, is it possible to find peace? In a world being drained of its natural resources, is it conceivable that we do nothing?

Enough: Contentment in an Age of Excess. activist and author of The Irresistible Revolution. This book is not a self-righteous rant.

Enough: Contentment in an Age of Excess. Will Samson is good at opening thoughtful dialogue; a recent conversation was about social justice.

Finding books BookSee BookSee - Download books for free. Enough: Contentment in an Age of Excess (Epub & Mobi). Will Samson, Shane Claiborne.

Will Samson had a typical childhood background growing up in the typical American church. Samson is white, middle class and suburban.

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Enough: Contentment in an Age of Excess : Paperback : Will Samson, Shane Claiborne : 9780781445429. Common Prayer: A Liturgy for Ordinary Radicals by Shane Claiborne. Reading level: Ages 18 and up. 592 pages. Author: Shane Claiborne. Becoming the Answer to Our Prayers: Prayer for Ordinary Radicals: Shane Claiborne, Jonathan Wilson-Hartgrove. Books :) Bethel College Spiritual Path Divinity School Christian Clothing Impulse Christianity Community Spirituality Sabbatical.

How much is enough?

In an age of conspicuous consumption-of designer sunglasses, jeweled cell phones, and five-thousand-square-foot homes-is it possible to be content? In a society where children spend more time worrying about their weight than their grades, is it possible to find peace? In a world being drained of its natural resources, is it conceivable that we do nothing? And with a universe of dazzling temptation at our fingertips, will we still seek the God of all creation?

Will Samson is good at opening thoughtful dialogue; a recent conversation was about social justice. In Enough, his latest wide-ranging, insightful book, Will addresses the idea of finding contentment in this age of excess. With a casual, accessible writing style, he discusses consumerism, contentment as a Christian discipline, and the notion of stewarding our resources. In four sections, Will outlines the ideas that drive a consumeristic mindset; the effects those ideas have on ourselves, our communities, and the earth; conclusions about the situation; and practical solutions for negotiating everyday life once we understand that our abundant God is, in fact, enough.

If you're exhausted from keeping up with the Joneses, or if you're looking for the balance between what is necessary and what is too much, just stop. Enough is enough.


Anaginn
Will Samson and I have very similar theological and political backgrounds. And while he now considers himself part of the emergent church movement and I have not moved that direction, we have both asked the same question and come up with similar answers. Samson has articulated them better than I have and lived them out in a more consistent and substantial way.

This book is about living out a life consistent with the New Testament in ways that have been ignored in large part by conservative evangelical American Christianity. In a readable and somewhat anecdotal style, it address both the theory and the practicalities of living in a God-honoring way, which of course includes loving our neighbours as ourselves.

To summarize Samson's summary of his book: 1. as a culture and church we have been consumed with the idea of stuff; 2. we are not consumed by God the same way we are consumed by stuff and don't believe God it's sufficient; 3. Jesus is the best resource to answer the question of what is enough; 4. we have to rethink what we believe about the future and how it shapes out actions; 5. our lack of concern for questions about enough is harming our bodies, the earth, our economy, and our communities; 6. we need "communities of moral formation"/Eucharistic communities shaped by the radical message of the gospel; and 7. we can find wholeness in God.
Morlunn
Sincere but misguided attempt addressing the frustration many Christians have with consumerism and being content. It appears that Will has experienced personal dissolution with the church which I can relate to and empathise with but that's not a new paradigm in church life. I won't church bash but let it be known that my personal church experience includes both sides of the church divide. Neither side gets it perfect. Jesus does however! The liberal bias Will seems to gravitate heavily to (I'm trying to be gracious) rather than a Biblical view of contentment in all things made it almost impossible to finish the book. But I did in an attempt to give him the benefit of the doubt and find threads of truth within the book. It's not about Democrat vs Republican. As others have stated "God doesn't take sides, He takes over!" As He does, lives change, communities change, nations change and our world will change. It starts with me saying "Enough", and asking what do I need to be grateful for and content with.
Agalas
[ This review originally appeared on englewoodreview.org ]

There are any number of books being written at present about economics; many of these that have been on my reading list have to do with the sorry state of the global food economy. Take, for instance, The End of Food, a thorough and necessary account of food economies, but one that commonly assumes a default of "a food economy...defined by scarcity." Indeed, the buzzwords of current economic discourse all seem to connote doom and gloom: "economic downturn," "recession anxiety," etc. So how welcome is Will Samson's new book Enough: Contentment in an Age of Excess, which goes right to the heart of modern economics, namely that "we are people consumed by stuff" (notably, this point is missing from almost all conversation about "the economy"). Further, as Samson goes out of his way to make clear that he understands this problem to be theological as much (or more) than just cultural, he posits that "we are not consumed by an incarnational God the same way we are consumed by stuff."

To begin to address the question of consumerism, the "way of thinking about stuff that believes the consumption of things...is what will...make us content," Samson makes some general remarks that guide the rest of the book, and that I hope will inform an even broader conversation:

"Is there enough for everyone? This is an economic question, and in our discussion here I am certainly going to try and address the question from an economic perspective. But it is not just an economic question, is it? In fact, the question of whether there are sufficient resources in this world may be one of the most important theological questions of our time. How we answer it reveals much regarding our belief about the character of God: who we think God is, how we think God provides for the creation, and what role humans play in that work - this all relates directly to our understanding of God."

Samson's understanding of the kingdom of God is first of all radically incarnational; it is played out in every facet of the world, "the Word became flesh and dwelt among us." Secondly, it is communal, realized most fully in the gathered body, what Samson names the "Eucharistic community."

The Eucharist meal is the common image of abundance throughout Enough, and seems particularly appropriate this Easter week. Samson reminds that this meal is the model for the church: "the bread and wine are made of other elements but are no longer able to be described as a simple composite of these elements: they have become new creations. In the same way, we are called to give of ourselves to our communities and to the world. But, we are called as communities to do so" (emphasis added). Additionally, the elements are "given graciously," the meal is sensual and physical, and it "provides an alternative telling of the other stories that have come to dominate the church in modernity."

The flesh and blood of the Eucharist meal, then, is the image of the abundance of God, embodied in Christ crucified and risen, and offered for participation to the church, that it be "one body," incarnate in the world. Samson offers a rich understanding of the ways we have failed to embody this sacrificial calling, turning instead to a fascination with stuff - commodities of both the free market, and a commodified religion.

Enough is told through much of Will's own narrative, from early formational experiences of the church and American capitalism, to the present, as members with his family of an intentional community in Lexington, Kentucky. Much of the book is a large theological framework to understand an economics based on the kingdom of God, perhaps similar to what Wendell Berry has called "the Great Economy." And for all of the thoughtful theology, Will remains easy to read and funny (he is perhaps the first to use language like "mac daddy" with regards to eschatology.)
Several chapters in the second half are devoted to specific practices that would give shape to a "Eucharistic Community," such as eating together, seeing the local neighborhood by walking or biking, investing in people rather than corporations, and spending locally; all of these are suggestions being made by many today, but for Samson these practices are tied to larger telos: "we must find ourselves in a broader story, namely the very presence of God that occurs within the gathered community of Jesus followers." Conversion, a continuous process, wholeness and gratitude are also at the heart of this community.

Enough is an encouragement that the gathered body of the church need not worry "what we will eat..." if we begin to embrace a Eucharistic understanding of the abundance of resources given. Particularly as the use of this world's resources are being called into question at every turn, Samson reminds that perhaps the question is not Is there enough?, but rather, how shall we use what has been given?
Mr.mclav
This is a timely read in our culture and for all Christ followers. May we all move in this direction and form stronger communities in doing so.
Nayatol
It's one of those books that isn't pleasant to read, because it's so challenging. But if you think of yourself as a follower of Jesus, and actually want to follow in his footsteps, not just offer Sunday lip service, then you need to live by the principles he outlines.

It's a worthwhile read. It reminds of some things, and puts others in perspective. Very helpful, especially going into the Buying Frenzy associated with Christmas in this country.

Wholly recommended for those who are seeking the deeper path.
GoodBuyMyFriends
This book challenges most of American Christianity in a bold and poignant way. Are we preaching the gospel? Or capitalist consumerism? Completely convicted.
Gralsa
An inspiring book! I like the practical suggestions given for a simpler way of living. We live in a community with many needs and have found it satisfying to give and share with each other. I would recommend this book to Christians who want to live a richer, more satisfying life.
Easy-to-read book abut the excesses of modern western society with viable alternatives for a different lifesryle.