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by Ellie Kay
Download Living Rich for Less: Create the Lifestyle You Want by Giving, Saving, and Spending Smart fb2
Christian Living
  • Author:
    Ellie Kay
  • ISBN:
    0739383132
  • ISBN13:
    978-0739383131
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Random House Audio; Abridged edition (December 16, 2008)
  • Subcategory:
    Christian Living
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1781 kb
  • ePUB format
    1823 kb
  • DJVU format
    1661 kb
  • Rating:
    4.6
  • Votes:
    274
  • Formats:
    lit azw txt docx


In her book, Living Rich for Less, Kay provides practical insights for people living on a budget, that is, just . Then of course there's saving. Hopefully if you're picking up a book like Living Rich for Less, you don't need a lot of convincing that saving is important.

In her book, Living Rich for Less, Kay provides practical insights for people living on a budget, that is, just about everyone. If you're a fan of Dave Ramsey, Ron Blue, and their ilk, you'll enjoy Kay. True to her experience as a columnist for Family Circle, Women's World, and USA Today, she's a bit more feminine and more casual and breezy in style than her male counterparts, but no less valuable to read. The last portion covers the 80%, which is of greatest concern to most families.

Living Rich for Less book. "Ellie Kay's advice for mr. and Mrs America and not just wall street.

The book is organized into three sections-Giving 10%, Saving 10%, and Spending Smart the other 80% (her 10/10/80 Rule). There are several trademarked slogans (which gets annoying after a while) to keep you paying attention (the Cha Ching Factor (tm) for example.

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Living Rich for Less helps anyone get there in our taxed-out, maxed-out times. Because financial security doesn’t mean just genuine prosperity, but being able to live luxuriously, give generously, and care for yourself as well as the others around you. Why keep up with the Joneses when you can be them? Author Bio. ▼▲. Ellie Kay is the best-selling author of Half-Priced Living and eleven other titles, including A Tip A Day with Ellie Kay and The Debt Diet, with more than 350,000 books sold.

Аудиокнига "Living Rich for Less: Create the Lifestyle You Want by Giving, Saving, and Spending Smart", Ellie Kay. Читает Cassandra Campbell. Мгновенный доступ к вашим любимым книгам без обязательной ежемесячной платы. Слушайте книги через. Слушайте книги через Интернет и в офлайн-режиме на устройствах Android, iOS, Chromecast, а также с помощью Google Ассистента. Скачайте Google Play Аудиокниги сегодня!

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Автор: Kay Ellie Название: Living Rich for Less: Create the Lifestyle You Want by Giving, Saving, and Spending Smart .

Описание: You really can be rich in every way, every day. So you want to own the home you love, make memories on wonderful vacations with family or friends, finance college educations, and help others too? You can starting here and now.

You really can be rich in every way, every day.So you want to own the home you love, make memories on wonderful vacations with family or friends, finance college educations, and help others too?You can–starting here and now.With lively humor, proven know-how, and practical principles for financial health, Living Rich for Less helps you stretch your dollars to realize the lifestyle of your dreams. Ellie Kay’s entertaining and enlightening examples show you simple steps to save, spend, and give smart, and her three main principles are undergirded by dozens of effective rules and hundreds of Cha-Ching Factor™ tips that keep or put money in your pocket. Ellie knows what it’s like to be financially-strapped or struggling, wanting to be the Joneses but feeling as poor in spirit as in pocketbook. She went, within two and a half years, from being a new wife and mom with $40,000 in consumer debt and seven children (and college educations) to support, to being completely debt-free and within fifteen years able to pay cash for eleven different cars, give away three of those cars, buy two five-bedroom houses (moving from one to the other) and nicely furnish each, take wonderful vacations, dress her family in fine fashion; and support more than thirty non-profit organizations in more than a dozen different countries, giving away more than $100,000.Isn’t that the kind of transformation to a rich life that you want?Living Rich for Less helps anyone get there in our taxed-out, maxed-out times. Because financial security doesn’t mean just genuine prosperity, but being able to live luxuriously, give generously, and care for yourself as well as the others around you.Why keep up with the Joneses when you can be them?From the Hardcover edition.

Clandratha
gave as gift
Worla
Read it, awesome. Haven't been able to implement what it says I should do. Bad on me.
Dancing Lion
A few of the stories are in her previous books and she follows her usual theme, but there's enough new that I am glad I made the purchase. It's like the Ellie Kay remix. : )
Kann
It's just okay (3 stars) but for those readers just starting out on a journey to seeking more financial freedom, it is a motivational book to show that digging out of debt, spending smarter, donating/giving, and learning new life lessons are possible, practical and overall profitable to the family finances. Don't expect earth shattering tips and tricks in this book but for the price of the book (check it out at the library first) you may end up with a keeper book to refer back to from time to time. I have yet to figure out how *I* can save $30,000 this year when I barely make that between my wife and I but there are tips on how to save a few hundred, maybe thousands, of dollars depending on your lifestyle and priorities. As long as I recoup the money that I spend on a keeper book and have a few hours of reading instead of shopping and being mindful to how much money consumers do waste, the book is a bargain in itself. Sure there could be more tips and tricks in this book rather than sounding like a broken record from other financial experts about the 10/10/80 principals and Ellie's autobiography but it's not a horrible book nor a waste of time or money. There are far better and far worse books out there but Ellie has a down to earth writing style that will get you to think more about the future than the past. There's hope... There's help! I intend to read all of Ellie Kay's books because just a few tips or website referrals could save me more and more per week, month, and year. A lot of the book is common sense but knowing it and applying it are two different things. The goal is to create the lifestyle you want... and you can!!!
Stick
"There is a rich lifestyle imbedded in your paycheck." (p. 2). The author continues the average U.S. family income is $48,000 with 85% of the population (household?) making $100,000! But, there are no footnotes citing source.
"How you can save $30,000 this year," shouts the cover. And then I realize I do not even clear $30,000 a year and neither do many of the other people I know. When Kay says you can save $8,000 a year on groceries, I check to see that I hardly spend more than that sum.
But, start by giving away the first 10% of your income, saving the second 10%, and living prudently on the balance, even though you might squander your savings on a new washing machine. That is still better than putting a major purchase on a card. This is good advice.
The born saver money statements on pages 12-13 are worth a second read for everyone.
I do, however, have a few points to be considered about this title.
1. Income levels. The statement that 85% of the population makes $100,000 is unbelievable. I had lunch with an IUPUI professor of statistics who told me the first day of class he tells his students that 85% of all statistics are wrong. Then he waits and a couple students will look up and say, "What the...?" What he meant was that 85% of all statistics are wrong, including that one. Unless, the obscene and immoral salaries of billionaires who rule over us somehow obfuscate the stats, the number has to be flat out incorrect.
2. Charity. The 10% first rule should be followed by everyone, but with caution. The local food pantry is always in our county newspaper with volunteers and chairman patting themselves on the back for being oh so swell. But, these very same individuals voted for officials and policies that shut down local factories and shipped jobs overseas and for policies abrogating worker rights income, and security. They actually created the scenario in which extensive food pantries are needed. Some charities spend your money treating medical conditions rather finding a prevention. Make sure your charity is doing something to improve the world rather than being part or cause of the problem.
3. Who you work for and buy cheap from. The best know fast food franchise cost the government, by which I mean you, Mr. and Mrs. Taxpayer, almost as much in employee entitlements such as rent assistance, Medicaid, heat assistance, food assistance and so forth as it pays in wages. In fact, the leading box store's financial help line for employees suggests employees go on these programs rather than work for a living wage. The rock bottom bargains mean the employees do not earn a living wage. In fact, the employees' owners fly around in private jets that cost many times a worker's lifetime gross income. Thus, you are part of the problem! Maybe you are the problem. I would make exception for insurances companies, banks, and stock brokers, however... The poverty, horrible conditions, damage to the ecology, etc. created by bottom line thinking is not a legacy I wish to live with.
4. Military benefits. Having five children in seven years would bankrupt most folks I know just for the medical expenses. With the pitiful medical insurance most young working people have, with the exception of Medicaid recipients, it can easily cost the couple a deductible of 6 to 20 thousand dollars each birth, especially with a few complications.
However, if someone has a child while on active or as a dependent of an active duty officer, once again you, Mr. and Mrs. Taxpayer, cover the bill. There is also a housing allowance during active duty. Tri-Care for Life and pension upon certified retirement are benefits not available to the average working Joe. Did I mention tuition assistance. If you are on active duty or retired active duty, at least in the Hoosier state, your dependent children receive free tuition at state colleges. Again, thank you, Mr. and Mrs. Taxpayer.
After, twenty years, retired active duty received retirement for life with a COLA. Does your job, Mr. and Mrs. Taxpayer, offer such a benefit.
Even a reservist, and I would suggest that all boys join the Guard for twenty years after graduating high school. Even a reservist receives a a pension beginning at age 60, Tri-Care at 60 and Tri-Care for Life at 65.
What I have been saying is that the author is not like a civilian employee.
Still the money saver and 10-10-80 advice is worth the read.
Quashant
The first thing to say about Ellie Kay is that she grew up in Fort Worth! So of course I'm going to love a book by a Fort Worth girl! In her book, Living Rich for Less, Kay provides practical insights for people living on a budget, that is, just about everyone. If you're a fan of Dave Ramsey, Ron Blue, and their ilk, you'll enjoy Kay. True to her experience as a columnist for Family Circle, Women's World, and USA Today, she's a bit more feminine and more casual and breezy in style than her male counterparts, but no less valuable to read.

Kay starts off with her priorities in the right place: the first chapters of the book are dedicated to giving. She encourages a 10-10-80 plan, in which you give away 10%, save 10%, then plan and spend wisely the remaining 80%. It's significant that it's not the 80-10-10 plan or the 10-80-10 plan. Giving comes first, no matter what. Even families with low incomes can give. Kay lays out some principles of wise giving.

Then of course there's saving. Hopefully if you're picking up a book like Living Rich for Less, you don't need a lot of convincing that saving is important. The last portion covers the 80%, which is of greatest concern to most families. She encourages getting out of debt, but doesn't hammer on it the way Ramsey does (but maybe she should). There are plenty of practical ideas here for saving, which can add up to a significant difference in the family budget. She spends a seemingly disproportionate amount of space on couponing (good advice) and saving money on cruises (OK advice if you're going on a cruise, but a whole chapter? Seemed like a bit much).

Kay gives a lot to think about here, which is her goal: think about where your money goes and make it work for you. The end result is a little superficial, but the book lays down some principles to get you pointed in the right direction.