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by Adrian Fortescue
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Christian Denominations & Sects
  • Author:
    Adrian Fortescue
  • ISBN:
    0971598614
  • ISBN13:
    978-0971598614
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Gorgias Press (December 1, 2001)
  • Pages:
    500 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Christian Denominations & Sects
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1486 kb
  • ePUB format
    1867 kb
  • DJVU format
    1990 kb
  • Rating:
    4.5
  • Votes:
    124
  • Formats:
    doc mbr lrf docx


The Orthodox Eastern Church. by. Fortescue, Adrian, 1874-1923. CONTENTS List of Books PART I THE ORTHODOX EASTERN CHURCH BEFORE THE SCHISM CHAPTER I The Great Patriarchates 5 1. Rome.

The Orthodox Eastern Church. Public Domain Mark . Orthodox Eastern Church - History, Orthodox Eastern Church.

Fortescue's treatment of the actual belief of the Eastern communion today follows this history, and is extremely helpful. He describes the East's differing theological priorities, attitudes, and developments from the West, arguing that, despite all of these, the break between East and West truly is a "pure" schism, at least from a Catholic's point of view.

The Orthodox Church of Georgia became autocephalous in the 5th century, but its independence .

The Orthodox Church of Georgia became autocephalous in the 5th century, but its independence was suppressed by the Church of Russia in the early 19th century. Meanwhile, the tiny Church of Sinai, which basically consists of St. Catherine's Monastery, repeatedly tried to push itself as an autocephalous Church in the 16th-19th centuries.

Adrian Fortescue, a direct descendant of the martyr Adrian Fortescue (died 1539), was born on 14 January 1874 in. .Among his most famous works are The Orthodox Eastern Church and The Lesser Eastern Churches.

Adrian Fortescue, a direct descendant of the martyr Adrian Fortescue (died 1539), was born on 14 January 1874 in Hampstead, London, into a Midland county family of ancient lineage and high position. His father was Edward Fortescue, a renowned high church Anglican clergyman who was "highly regarded as a preacher and retreat master" and an active participant in the Anglo-Catholic Oxford Movement, before he was received into the Catholic Church.

WITH ILLUSTRATIONS BY THE AUTHOR. LONDON CATHOLIC TRUTH SOCIETY 69 SOUTHWARK BRIDGE ROAD, . πάτραν δ’ ἔναιον ἡ μὲν ἑλλάδακλήρῳ λαχοῦσα γαῖαν, ἡ δὲ βάρβαρον. οὐτω στάσιν τιν’, ὡς ἐγὼ δόκουν ὁρᾶν,τεύχειν ἐν ἀλλήλαισιν. PART I. THE ORTHODOX EASTERN CHURCH BEFORE THE SCHISM.

The Orthodox Eastern Church book. Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem. The Orthodox Eastern Church. Adrian Fortescue.

A Tour of the Orthodox World at the Turn of the 20th Century: The Church of Greece.

Adrian Fortescue, Brother Hermenegild Tosf. THIS little book is intended to supply not so much matter for controversy as a certain amount of information about the Orthodox Church. London : Catholic Truth Society. You must be logged in to Tag Records. The Orthodox Eastern Church, Adrian Fortescue. The Orthodox Eastern Church, Adrian Fortescue Catholic Truth Society London 1907. Australian/Harvard Citation. 1907, The Orthodox Eastern Church, Adrian Fortescue Catholic Truth Society London. Book, Online - Google Books.

The body about which this book treats always calls itself the Orthodox Eastern Church, and in the East we call them Orthodox and they call us Catholics (unless when they mean to be rude).

The body about which this book treats always calls itself the Orthodox Eastern Church, and in the East we call them Orthodox and they call us Catholics (unless when they mean to be rude), and no one thinks for a moment that either uses these names except as technical terms.

This classic trilogy had a groundbreaking effect in ringing an awareness of the broader Christian World to westerners. It remains among the most readable and authoritative sources about the churches to the east of Rome.

Crazy
I'm reviewing the reprint by Kessinger Publishing. It is an exact facsimile of the 1908 version. The reproduction is perfect.

Now to the content.
Adrian Fortescue is full of cultural superiority and confidence. He knows his stuff. His book is packed full of information that demonstrates this time and again. However, he has little sympathy for Orthodoxy. He is more than happy to point out problems, scandals, weaknesses, errors of judgement, etc within Orthodoxy. Sometimes very gleefully, even when his own church is guilty of the same thing.

The overview of the history of the church up to 1054 is fairly standard. Fortescue' bias for the Papacy is easy to spot. The book becomes valuable when it reaches his time (1908). Fortescue' description of contemporary Orthodoxy is interesting- World War One hasn't happened so the Russian Revolution is in the future. Russian is an Orthodox Empire. Millions of Orthodox Christians still live in the Ottoman Empire as the massacres and population exchange of 1922 haven't happened. There is only a tiny Orthodox diaspora. The UK (where Fortescue is writing) only had 5 churches (1 Russian, 4 Greek) when he wrote and no resident bishop.

Also valuable is Fortescue's account of the theological and liturgical differences between Orthodoxy and Roman Catholicism.
BroWelm
I found this book when as I was been exploring the filioque clause and things related to it. In short it was not what I was expecting. Probably the first half of the book, as he speaks about the undivided Church was helpful and covered lots of ground. For me the book fell apart somewhere between 1014 and 1054. I found it a great deal less even handed than I would have expected. I probably hadn't looked at the date of authorship till that point, and perhaps that accounts for some of it. What does become clear to a 21st century western mind is that the questions of primacy and power, hierarchy and council have been some of the worst features of Church life.
Jonide
I would like to write about the text of the paperback, not on the content: this is an edition of GeneralBooks who scanned the original book (that is available in pdf for the buyers - fortunately), passed it through OCR, and printed what came out. NO checking and NO formatting was done on the text. Even the exising formatting is often missing (footnotes follow mostly continously in the same row (!) the text of one-one page), titles may miss on the beginning of chapters, one part of the content disappeared (I am not even aware of OCR to do that!). Without the original scanned book, it is impossible to read. I wonder how much it would have added to the present price to just check for formatting and separating text from footnotes, nothing more. As it is now, I would not recommend it at all, but only to buy the pdf, and print it out at home. The present state of the book is simply inacceptable.
Fiarynara
Pelikan is a challenge to read, because he allows the arguments of history to remain as complex as they were when they were raging.

But he does give a good feel for the spirit that formed the Orthodox Church as it exists today. It is treated objectively, and I suppose sympathetically. (I'm told he converted to Orthodoxy before he died).

Less complex discussions of Orthodoxy exist, especially Timothy Ware's books. There is also a very nice issue of Christian History magazine that gives a good overview.

This is the most serious discussion of Orthodox doctrine that I have seen.