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by Eryl W. Davies
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Bible Study & Reference
  • Author:
    Eryl W. Davies
  • ISBN:
    056730549X
  • ISBN13:
    978-0567305497
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    T&T Clark; 1 edition (November 11, 2010)
  • Pages:
    192 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Bible Study & Reference
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1180 kb
  • ePUB format
    1531 kb
  • DJVU format
    1616 kb
  • Rating:
    4.3
  • Votes:
    175
  • Formats:
    docx lit lrf txt


Ethics in the Bible refers to the system(s) or theory(ies) produced by the study, interpretation, and evaluation of biblical morals, (including the moral code, standards, principles, behaviors, conscience, values, rules of conduct, or beliefs concern.

Ethics in the Bible refers to the system(s) or theory(ies) produced by the study, interpretation, and evaluation of biblical morals, (including the moral code, standards, principles, behaviors, conscience, values, rules of conduct, or beliefs concerned with good and evil and right and wrong), that are found in the Hebrew and Christian Bibles. It comprises a narrow part of the larger fields of Jewish and Christian ethics, which are themselves parts of the larger field of philosophical ethics

Bible Study & Reference.

Bible Study & Reference. Eryl Davies not only confronts one of the major moral problems presented by the Hebrew Bible but also offers a lucid analysis of the ways in which scholars have tried to deal with it. Clear-headed and refreshing, this book will be an ideal text-book for courses on biblical ethics. – John J. Collins, Holmes Professor of Old Testament, Yale Divinity School, New Haven, USA. (Sanford Lakoff).

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Immoral Bible: Approaches to Biblical Ethics as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

New York: T&T Clark International, 2010.

Eryl W. Davies discusses the ethically problematic passages of the Hebrew Bible and the way scholars have addressed aspects of the bible generally regarded as offensive and unacceptable. ISBN13:9780567261625. Release Date:November 2010.

This book discusses the ethically problematic passages of the Hebrew Bible and the way scholars have addressed aspects of the bible generally regarded as offensive and unacceptable. In this work Eryl W. Davies sums up a career's worth of in-depth reflection on the thorny issue of biblical ethics examining the bible's, at times problematic, stance upon slavery, polygamy and perhaps its most troublesome aspect, the sanctioning of violence and warfare

Eryl W. Davies, ebrary, Inc. Date. Section: Bibliography 1: Approaches to Hebrew Bible/Old Testament Ethics

Eryl W. Section: Bibliography 1: Approaches to Hebrew Bible/Old Testament Ethics Previous: Character ethics and the Old Testament: moral.

The Immoral Bible: Approaches to Old Testament Ethics (Paperback) There is much in this book to set everyone thinking.

The Immoral Bible: Approaches to Old Testament Ethics (Paperback). Eryl Wynn Davies (author). Eryl W. Davies is one of the keen observers of interpretive method in the contemporary study of the Hebrew Bible. There is much in this book to set everyone thinking. The Catholic Herald Davies takes all the strategies seriously and his survey will be of as much value to the general reader as to the specialist.

Eryl W. Davies discusses the ethically problematic passages of the Hebrew Bible and the way scholars have addressed aspects of the bible generally regarded as offensive and unacceptable.

Natety
it is a wonderful book.it helps enormously to consider the bible as conditioned by the culture of the time.I feel that all theological seminars should be required to read it.

I give it 5 stars. I loved it.
Cel
Informative and controversial. Shocking too in some of what it reveals about the Bible.
Bele
An informative book, insofar as it describes various ways in which certain types of readers have tried to deal with those many parts of the Old Testament that don’t jibe with the moral sense of twentieth century and later Americans. (A chapter on Origen’s allegorical approach is just showing off; it doesn’t contribute to the discussion.) Davies’ focuses on Joshua 6-11, which describes how the Hebrews conquered Canaan and exterminated the Canaanites. – And Davies expends much rhetoric lamenting this “deliberate destruction of an entire population.” The problem is that this “genocide” never occurred: the archeological record belies it; the ancient Hebrews knew that the Canaanites lived among them, and that their religious rites were a constant temptation; even a reader of Judges, the book that immediately follows Joshua, can see that Joshua 6-11 didn’t happen. Because Davies doesn’t explore this fact, the book, although a stirring tribute to political correctness, never grapples with real issues: What was the mindset of ancient people who wrote canonical histories of things that they knew never happened? How do we explain the Bible’s repetitions and inconsistencies, especially since there is evidence that its redactors spent time and effort to fashion the book as it stands? Finally, to get to Davies’ concern with modern readers: although modern readers should disapprove of particularly barbaric parts of the Bible, it seems like a waste of energy to work oneself up into a moral outrage about them. Davies frequently quotes James Barr, who Davies seems to think is a particularly sane interpreter. According to Davies, Barr has “remarked” that “the people of Jericho are consecrated to destruction for only one reason, namely that they are people living in Jericho.” Ok, it would have been terrible if it had happened (3000 years ago!), but it didn’t, any more than that the walls came a-tumblin’ down. It is noteworthy that Davies’ references to modern Israel’s "dispossession" of Palestinians, the fact that some Jewish militants have resorted to "genocide" to resolve the “Arab problem,” and his synchronic assumptions about the Bible give his book a faint, but undisguised, whiff of anti-semitism.