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by Mark G. Brett
Download Genesis: Procreation and the Politics of Identity (Old Testament Readings) fb2
Bible Study & Reference
  • Author:
    Mark G. Brett
  • ISBN:
    0415141508
  • ISBN13:
    978-0415141505
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Routledge (September 22, 2000)
  • Pages:
    192 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Bible Study & Reference
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1994 kb
  • ePUB format
    1999 kb
  • DJVU format
    1348 kb
  • Rating:
    4.3
  • Votes:
    242
  • Formats:
    lit rtf lrf txt


Mark G. Brett is Professor of Old Testament at Whitley College, Melbourne. Brett's writes very well and the book was immensely readable.

Mark G. Series: Old Testament Readings.

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Start by marking Genesis: Procreation and the Politics of Identity (Old Testament Readings) as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Read by Mark G. Brett.

Combining insights from social and literary theory as well as traditional historical studies, Mark Brett argues that the first book of the Bible can be read as resistance literature. was designed to undermine the ethnocentism of the imperial governors of the Persian period (fifth century BCE). Categories: Other Social Sciences\Politics.

Routledge Old Testament Readings.

Combining insights from social and literary theory as well as traditional historical studies, Mark Brett argues that the first book of the Bible can be read as resistance literature. Old Testament Readings. Learn mor. ubject Categories.

Genesis: Procreation and the Politics of Identity (Old Testament Readings). Colors, Markings and Variants of the Messerschmitt Bf 109 from June 1944 to May 1945. Category: Вооружение. Category: Общественные науки прочие, Политика. 709 Kb. Biblical Criticism in Crisis?: The Impact of the Canonical Approach on Old Testament Studies. Category: Образование. 1 Mb. Decolonizing God: The Bible in the Tides of Empire (The Bible in the Modern World).

Mark Brett places the first book of the Bible firmly within its sociopolitical context. Saved in: Main Author: Brett, Mark G. Other Authors: EBSCO Publishing (Firm).

This book presents a unique approach to Ezra-Nehemiah in the combination of two approaches - the literary and the historical. It challenges commonly held assumptions not from radical theory, but from careful attention to the text itself. Recently added by. TBN-SPU, malc, Chandra97, mariachb, skraftchick, svd2srv, iangpacker,, drjea2010.

Genesis: Procreation and the Politics of Identity. Politicizing the (In)audible: A Short Critique of Mark Brett's Genesis (with Special Reference to Genesis 34)'. Crossroads: An Interdisciplinary Journal for the Study of History, Philosophy, Religion and Classics (1): 49–57. Sexual Transgression in the Hebrew Bible. Brett, Genesis: Procreation and the Politics of Identity (London and New York: Routledge, 2000) . James C. Scott, Domination and the Arts of Resistance: Hidden Transcript (New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1990). Brett, Genesis: Procreation and the Politics of Identity (London and New York: Routledge, 2000), 2–. oogle Scholar. 31. Kenneth Hoglund, Achaemenid Imperial Administration in Syria-Palestine and the Missions of Ezra and Nehemiah (Atlanta, GA: Scholars Press, 1992), 209–210.

Combining insights from social and literary theory as well as traditional historical studies, Mark Brett argues that the first book of the Bible can be read as resistance literature.Placing the theological text firmly within its socio-political context, he shows that the editors of Genesis were directly engaged with contemporary issues, especially the nature of an authentic community, and that the book was designed to undermine the ethnocentism of the imperial governors of the Persian period (fifth century BCE).

Windworker
Mark Brett argues that Genesis, in the form we have received it, was formed during the period of the Persian occupancy. The argument put forth is that the authors/editors deliberately structured the narrative with an 'intentional hybridity'. That is to say that the authors structured the narratives of Genesis in order to critique the dominant cultural ideologies of that day (found primarily in Ezra and Nehemiah) by placing the dominant ideologies in ambiguous circumstances. For example, the holy seed tradition (from Ezra 9:1-2) is questioned by displaying that Esau recieved Abram's covenant blessing of many nations not just in addition to Jacob, but before him (Gen 36:31) and this with foreign wives.

Despite his opening remarks on the benefits of a 'methodological pluralism' (which I found a little tedious), Brett's commentary is mostly focussed, rightly in my estimation, on narrative concerns (although he is not constrained by narrative criticism only). As he admits, the commentary is not meant to be a line by line expose on Genesis, although he does demonstrate through each section of the book (starting at Genesis 1 and ending at Genesis 50), that the themes of holy seed, firstborn privelege and legal holiness are questioned by the structure of the narratives. Whilst I began with some concerns regarding this interpretive scheme, Brett's arguments are clear and compelling. Having now finished the book I can say that I am convinced.

Brett's writes very well and the book was immensely readable. Despite the brevity of the book I found that it covered all the major questions I had as a reader: Cain's unreasonable rejection, Abram's unreasonable blessing, Joseph's questionable policies etc. Brett eschews referring to JEDP issues explicitly, although those with such an interest will not find this commentary barren. Additionally he uses transliterated Hebrew only when necessary, which in my opinion, is the right way to do things. All in all I found this commentary a higly enjoyable read and would highly recommend it.
Marilace
It is very good for me