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by David L. Mathewson
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Bible Study & Reference
  • Author:
    David L. Mathewson
  • ISBN:
    9004186689
  • ISBN13:
    978-9004186682
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    BRILL (July 10, 2010)
  • Pages:
    206 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Bible Study & Reference
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    1559 kb
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The book of Revelation is well-known for its grammatical infelicities. David L. Mathewson, P.

The book of Revelation is well-known for its grammatical infelicities. More specifically, Revelation exhibits apparently odd use of Greek verb tenses. Most attemtps to describe this odd use of verb tenses start with the assumption that Greek verb tenses are primarily temporal in meaning. 1998) in New Testament, University of Aberdeen, Scotland, is Associate Professor of Biblical Studies at Gordon College, Wenham, MA, USA. He is the author of numerous articles on the book of Revelation, and the author of A New Heaven and a New Earth: The Meaning and Function of the Old Testament in Revelation 2. -22.

Linguistic Biblical Studies. The book of Revelation is well-known for its grammatical infelicities. By (author) David L. Mathewson. More specifically, Revelation exhibits apparently "odd" use of Greek verb tenses. This book applies verbal aspect theory to tense usage in Revelation and focuses on how the tenses, as communicating verbal aspect, function within sections of Revelation. Most attemtps to describe this "odd" use of verb tenses start with the assumption that Greek verb tenses are primarily temporal in meaning.

Mathewson, David L. Format: eBook. Assembled Product Dimensions (L x W x H). 0 x . 0 Inches.

Torleif Elgvin, NLA University College, Oslo.

How we measure 'reads'. Torleif Elgvin, NLA University College, Oslo. Mathewson, Verbal Aspect in the Book of Revelation: The Function. of Greek Verb Tenses in John’s Apocalypse. has been taken to reflect a significant Semitic influence.

Read the Book of Revelation online. Study Scripture verses and use highlighting, underlining, and take notes in the Bible. This summary of the book of Revelation provides information about the title, author(s), date of writing, chronology, theme, theology, outline, a brief overview, and the chapters of the Book of Revelation. Four times the author identifies himself as John (1:1,4,9; 22:8). From as early as Justin Martyr in the second century . it has been held that this John was the apostle, the son of Zebedee (see Mt 10:2). The book itself reveals that the author was a Jew, well versed in Scripture, a church leader who was.

Reading the Book of Revelation: A Resource for Students (SBL . Verbal Aspect in Theory and Practice (Linguistic Biblical Studies).

Reading the Book of Revelation: A Resource for Students (SBL Resources for Biblical Study 44). Barr (e. Download (PDF). Читать. The Bible in Three Dimensions: Essays in Celebration of Forty Years of Biblical Studies in the University of Sheffield (JSOT Supplement). David J. A. Clines, Stanley E. Porter, Stephen E. Fowl.

Readers will profit from these engaging, even ground-breaking, studies of Abraham both in the Hebrew and Christian Scriptures and in other ancient and contemporary traditions.

Marvin R. Wilson has devoted much of his life to bringing Jews and Christians into dialogue with one another. His seminal text, Our Father Abraham - perhaps more than any other book - has clearly shown a generation of Christians the Jewish roots of their faith. Readers will profit from these engaging, even ground-breaking, studies of Abraham both in the Hebrew and Christian Scriptures and in other ancient and contemporary traditions. More than simply a Festschrift, this book encompasses a uniquely broad range of traditions having to do with Abraham.

The study concludes that early Christian communities in Greek and Roman cities regularly used lectors of servile status for public reading, which primarily took place in the context of weekly meal gatherings.

The study concludes that early Christian communities in Greek and Roman cities regularly used lectors of servile status for public reading, which primarily took place in the context of weekly meal gatherings

The book of Revelation is well-known for its grammatical infelicities. More specifically, Revelation exhibits apparently odd"" use of Greek verb tenses. Most attemtps to describe this ""odd"" use of verb tenses start with the assumption that Greek verb tenses are primarily temporal in meaning. In order to explain Revelation's apparent violation of these temporal values, scholars have proposed some level of semitic influence from the Hebrew tense system as making sense of this ""odd"" use of tenses. However, recent research into verbal aspect, which calls into question this temporal orientation, and suggests that Greek verb tenses grammaticalize aspect and not time, has opened up new avenues for explaining the Greek verb tense usage in Revelation. This book applies verbal aspect theory to tense usage in Revelation and focuses on how the tenses, as communicating verbal aspect, function within sections of Revelation.