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by Regt
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Bible Study & Reference
  • Author:
    Regt
  • ISBN:
    9023234448
  • ISBN13:
    978-9023234449
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Brill (January 1, 1999)
  • Pages:
    124 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Bible Study & Reference
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    1366 kb
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    1194 kb
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    4.2
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Start by marking Participants in Old Testament Texts and the . In this book, examples from many Biblical passages illustrate the patterns involved. How are participants introduced into a text and traced further?

Start by marking Participants in Old Testament Texts and the Translator: Reference Devices and Their Rhetorical Impact as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. These rules help to solv In Biblical Hebrew texts, individuals and groups are referred to according to specific rules and conventions. How are participants introduced into a text and traced further? When is this done by means of proper names, when by nouns, and when by pronominal elements? In this book, examples from many Biblical passages illustrate the patterns involved.

A Description of Participant Reference in Biblical Hebrew Narrative. Loading similar paper. he Allen Institute for Artificial IntelligenceProudly built by AI2 with the help of our.

Studia Semitica Neerlandica, Volume: 3. How are participants introduced into a text and traced further?

Studia Semitica Neerlandica, Volume: 39. Author: de Regt. In Biblical Hebrew texts, individuals and groups are referred to according to specific rules and conventions. These rules help to solve problems of participant reference in controversial passages. But it is not enough to know who are the participants; one needs to establish why they are referred to the way they are. Main characters in a text are referred to differently from others.

Participants in Old Testament Texts and the Translator. Reference Devices and their Rhetorical Impact. Studia Semitica Neerlandica 39). Assen: Van Gorcum. Literary Structure and Rhetorical Strategies in the Hebrew Bible.

You're using an out-of-date version of Internet Explorer. edu and the wider internet faster and more securely, please take a few seconds to upgrade your browser. De Regt, Participants in Old Testament Texts and the Translator. Participant Reference in Genesis 37.

How are participants introduced into a text and traced further? .

How are participants introduced into a text and traced further? When is this done by means of proper names, when by nouns, and when by pronominal elements? In this book, examples from many Biblical passages illustrate the patterns involved. Dr. Lénart de Regt teaches Bible Translation and Hebrew at the Free University of Amsterdam. In addition, he is a translation consultant for the United Bible Societies.

In Old Testament books, the places where traditionally a new chapter is made to begin are not always in line with the places where the biblical text divides itself into segments according to the structural coherence and syntactic discontinuities in the text itself. Some individual verses appear to be in the ‘wrong’ chapter. Starting with less controversial examples and moving on to more.

Request PDF On Jan 1, 2004, Randall Buth and others published Participants in Old Testament Texts and the .

Stephen H. Levinsohn.

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Studia Semitica Neerlandica, no. 39, Van Gorcum, Assen. Participants in Old Testament Texts and the Translator: Reference Devices and their Rhetorical Impact. Assen : Van Gorcum, 1999. T1 - Participants in Old Testament Texts and the Translator: Reference Devices and their Rhetorical Impact.

In Biblical Hebrew texts, individuals and groups are referred to according to specific rules and conventions. How are participants introduced into a text and traced further? When is this done by means of proper names, when by nouns, and when by pronominal elements? In this book, examples from many Biblical passages illustrate the patterns involved. These rules help to solve problems of participant reference in controversial passages.But it is not enough to know who are the participants; one needs to establish why they are referred to the way they are. Main characters in a text are referred to differently from others. Certain devices of participant reference help to indicate paragraph boundaries. Unusual references to participants aim to be noticed and have rhetorical impact. Proper names may occur where one would have expected a pronominal element (or vice versa). Participants may be mentioned in an unexpected order. Special attention is given to such unusual reference devices and the rhetorical strategies involved: climax, suspense and implicit comment. In a translation, these strategies should still be as clear as they are in the source text. So how have reference devices been handled in ancient and modern translations?