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by Henri Blocher
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Bible Study & Reference
  • Author:
    Henri Blocher
  • ISBN:
    0877843252
  • ISBN13:
    978-0877843252
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    IVP Books (November 17, 1984)
  • Pages:
    240 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Bible Study & Reference
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1548 kb
  • ePUB format
    1541 kb
  • DJVU format
    1273 kb
  • Rating:
    4.6
  • Votes:
    230
  • Formats:
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In October 2003, Henri Blocher was appointed to the Guenther H. Knoedler Chair of Theology at Wheaton College in. .This is an outstanding book that carefully and throughly exegetes the first three chapters of Genesis. In 2014 during his Systematic Theology course, .

In October 2003, Henri Blocher was appointed to the Guenther H. Knoedler Chair of Theology at Wheaton College in Wheaton, Illinois. Since 1965 he has served as professor of systematic theology at the Faculté Libre de Théologie Evangélique in Vaux-sur-Seine near Paris, France. One person found this helpful.

Henri A. G. Blocher (born September 3, 1937 in Leiden, Netherlands) is a French evangelical theologian. In the Beginning: The Opening Chapters of Genesis, InterVarsity Press (November 1984). He was Professor of Systematic Theology at fr:Faculté libre de théologie évangélique de Vaux-sur-Seine, France, from its founding in 1965 until 2003. He was the Gunther Knoedler Professor of Systematic Theology at Wheaton College Graduate School from 2003-2008, and is now Professor Emeritus of Systematic Theology back at Faculté Libre de Théologie Évangélique de Vaux-sur-Seine.

In The Beginning book. It will not call off the Quest for its origins. The opening chapters of Genesis – important at any time – have been the focal point of controversy for more than a century

In The Beginning book. Curiosity about our beginning continues to haunt the human race. The opening chapters of Genesis – important at any time – have been the focal point of controversy for more than a century. Few topics have been so hotly debated by theologians, philosophers and scientists alike. Henri Blocher argues that our primary task is to "Curiosity about our beginning continues to haunt the human race.

The introduction, Genesis 1:1–2, "In the beginnin. he earth was . Blocher, Henri (1984). In the Beginning: The Opening Chapters of Genesis. ISBN 978-0-87784-325-2. he earth was without form and void, and darkness was upon the face of the dee., describes the primal universe containing darkness, a watery "deep", and a formless earth, over which hovers the spirit of God. The following three days describe the first triad: the creation of light and its separation from the primal darkness (Ge. origins of the universe we must be sensitive to both the "book of words" (Scripture) and the "book of works" (nature).

The opening chapters of Genesis - important a. Henri Blocher argues that our primary task is to discover what these key chapters of the Bible originally meant.

The opening chapters of Genesis - important at any time - have been the focal point of controversy for more than a century. In October 2003, Henri Blocher was appointed to the Guenther H.

the opening chapters of Genesis. Appendix: Scientific hypotheses and the beginning of Genesis": p. 213-231. Bibliography: p. 12-14. Translation of: Révélation des origines.

The opening chapters of Genesis - important at any time - have been the focal . He has written six books, four of which have appeared in English, and several dozen articles. Blocher, a French evangelical theologian, was Gunther Knoedler Professor of Systematic Theology at Wheaton College . ISBN 083082605X In the Beginning: The Opening Chapters of Genesis, InterVarsity Press, 1984. Blocher, a French evangelical theologian, was Gunther Knoedler Professor of Systematic Theology at Wheaton College Graduate School from 2003-2008 a.d is Professor of Systematic Theology, Faculte Libre de Theologie Evangelique, Vaux-sur-Seine, France. Selected publications Original Sin: Illuminating the Riddle, InterVarsity Press, 2001. ISBN 0877843252 Evil and the Cross : An Analytical Look at the Problem of Pain, Kregel Publications, 2005

In the Beginning: The Opening Chapters of Genesis.

In the Beginning: The Opening Chapters of Genesis. Leicester:InterVarsity, 1984. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, .

"Curiosity about our beginning continues to haunt the human race. It will not call off the Quest for its origins." The opening chapters of Genesis -- important at any time -- have been the focal point of controversy for more than a century. Few topics have been so hotly debated by theologians, philosophers and scientists alike. Henri Blocher argues that our primary task is to discover what these key chapters of the Bible originally meant. Only then will we be able to unravel the knotty issues surrounding human origins. Taking into account a vast array of scholarship, Blocher provides a detailed study of creation week, the image of God, the significance of male and female, the garden covenant, the Fall, the curse and the promise of redemption. He also offers significanct theological insights into the creation-evolution debate.

Halloween
Although Blocher has a definite opinion of the nature and appropriate interpretation of the opening chapters of Genesis, he clearly and fairly summarises other common views too.

His well-argued position is that the literary structure of these chapters is so deliberate and precise that it should be seen as a literary arrangement rather than a factual or chronological one. The question is then what that literary arrangement signifies.

This is a valuable book to read alongside the many others that so often argue for either a literal seven-day creation or reject the creation accounts as fanciful pre-history. The Biblical agenda is shown as foreign to either of those agendas.
Bearus
One of the best, most-insightful books on the first few chapters of Genesis.
Xellerlu
Reviews about the content of this book have already been written, and I think, written truthfully. I would simply encourage prospective readers to pick up this book because of its style.

Henri Blocher begins with the premise that we should examine Genesis on its textual merits, not based on our ideas of science. As such, Mr. Blocher says we can examine what the text says FIRST, decide whether the framework interpretation if faithful to the Scripture as well as historical evidence (which he cites often, usually in the form of ancient language experts), and then consider the implications for science.

He also does an excellent job describing other authors' viewpoints on the subject. He is quite fair in analyzing their positions and uses their words whenever possible for further explanation. This style of arguement is refreshing because it does not rely on "academic bashing" where arguments are not explained, but simply ignored or brushed away with the phrase "this view is unacceptable on its face."

I thoroughly recommend reading this book, even if you anticipate disagreeing with it. It is worthwhile to stretch the limits of your knowledge of theology.
MARK BEN FORD
Blocher's work is very interesting. He advocates a literary interpretation of the creation narrative. I have seen better treaments than this, but his theory is very logical and well thought out, although I enjoyed reading this book, the writing is a little erudite at times, not for the beginning theologian, a knowledge of creation theory is advised.
Kulwes
This is an outstanding book that carefully and throughly exegetes the first three chapters of Genesis. In 2014 during his Systematic Theology course, J.I. Packer called this book “Far and away, in my judgment, the best exegesis of Genesis 1-3 that the world has seen yet.”
Shistus
An unconvincing attempt at suggesting that the Genesis account is not necessarily 6 24-hour days.
While I thought some of the information, and ideas were interesting, and even alluring in some fashion, I think they were alluring because they appeal to the flesh, and the refusal of the flesh to identify fully with the remarkable account of the creation of everything that was created, when it was created.

The author tries to distance himself from wrong-headed allegorical interpretations, such as one (if memory serves me right) that some Africans have (or do) have concerning the "forbidden fruit" as being the sexual union between the first man (Adam) and the first woman (Eve). But this is so easily dismissed it's not even funny, considering the fact that God almighty COMMANDED our first parents to be fruitful and multiply -- and He wasn't talking about working out mathematical problems. So the level of sheer ignorance and arrogance in such an interpretation makes me wonder if there's the true Spirit there at all. I leave that for the judgement of the Lord on the Last Day.

I just remember feeling exasperated in reading this book, and I'm all about having a good, hard intellectual challenge -- the kind that makes me have to gird my loins and really consider whether or not my world view is seriously being challenged. This was not the case. It was more like I was reading a book by someone living on the precipice of unbelief. NOTE: Meredith Kline is another one of those, which is why (along with his overuse of complicated terminology so that the "everyman" must struggle to understand anything he's appearing, on the surface, to be saying in the first place, but then having to circumnavigate the convoluted philosophy behind it all to discover just what the Hell he was actually saying in the end!) I don't care to read his books either.

Perhaps I'll give in another read in a few years. As for now, it goes nowhere near the top shelf of theological books.
Jorius
Did not care much for this book. I started it but never finished. Did not think it was very bionically based. Very dry reading.