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by Thomas C. Oden
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Bible Study & Reference
  • Author:
    Thomas C. Oden
  • ISBN:
    083083933X
  • ISBN13:
    978-0830839339
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    IVP Academic (August 11, 2011)
  • Pages:
    279 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Bible Study & Reference
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1634 kb
  • ePUB format
    1674 kb
  • DJVU format
    1599 kb
  • Rating:
    4.8
  • Votes:
    264
  • Formats:
    rtf lrf docx rtf


Publishers Weekly, July 11, 2011).

Publishers Weekly, July 11, 2011). The African Memory of Mark honors the way the Coptic Church has been the faithful, preeminent carrier of the Markan tradition in the church, and does that by weaving the different genres of sources into a narrative whole. Oden has made a good case for the African memory of Mark and helped a new generation of Christian ministers and scholars in the Global South to find their place in early Christianity. Stephen O. Presley, Southwestern Journal of Theology, Fall 2014).

The African Memory of Mark: Reassessing Early Church Tradition, 2011. Notes and references. Early Libyan Christianity, 2011. Oden, Thomas C. (2012).

In this provocative reassessment of early church tradition, Thomas C. Oden begins with the palette of New Testament evidence and adds to it the range of colors from traditional African sources, including synaxaries (compilations o. . Oden begins with the palette of New Testament evidence and adds to it the range of colors from traditional African sources, including synaxaries (compilations of short biographies of saints to be read on feast days), archaeological sites, non-Western historical documents and ancient churches. We often regard the author of the Gospel of Mark as an obscure figure about whom we know little. Oden begins with the . Western tradition, however, holds the African memory of Mark as a mere legend (233), as unreliable hagiographical oral tradition "received with a yawn" (222). As the Western tradition holds, which is what I was taught in my NT2 Gospels class, Mark was Palestinian in origin-born, raised, lived, and died.

Автор: Oden Thomas C. Название: The African Memory of Mark: Reassessing Early . This book presents the life of Memnon.

This book presents the life of Memnon. Early disputers with heretics such as Cerinthus and the Ebionites drew upon the Gospel of John to refute their heretical notions and uphold the full deity of Christ, and this Gospel more than any other was central to the trinitarian and christological debates of the fourth and fifth centuries. Oden begins with the palette of New . The result is a fresh and illuminating portrait of Mark, one that is deeply rooted in African memory and seldom viewed appreciatively in the West.

Thomas Oden calls for a radical reassessment of early church tradition by directing our attention to Africa, where a memory of St. Mark survives as the North African founder of the church in Alexandria. The result is an illuminating portrait that challenges long-standing assumptions in the West. Oden begins with . Whether or not the reader agrees with the argument of the book, Oden has raised the bar of scrutiny and challenged many of the unstated assumptions of conventional scholarship. Oden begins with the palette of New Testament . James Plueddemann, Trinity Journal, Spring 2014.

We often regard the author of the Gospel of Mark as an obscure figure about whom we know little.

We often regard the author of the Gospel of Mark as an obscure figure about whom we know little

We often regard the author of the Gospel of Mark as an obscure figure about whom we know little. Many would be surprised to learn how much fuller a picture of Mark exists within widespread African tradition, tradition that holds that Mark himself was from North Africa, that he founded the church in Alexandria, that he was an eyewitness to the Last Supper and Pentecost, that he was related not only to Barnabas but to Peter as well and accompanied him on many of his travels. In this provocative reassessment of early church tradition, Thomas C. Oden begins with the palette of New Testament evidence and adds to it the range of colors from traditional African sources, including synaxaries (compilations of short biographies of saints to be read on feast days), archaeological sites, non-Western historical documents and ancient churches. The result is a fresh and illuminating portrait of Mark, one that is deeply rooted in African memory and seldom viewed appreciatively in the West.

Vudojar
The same review can be written for this book as the other two: "How Africa Shaped the Christian Mind" and "Early Libyan Christianity." On the plus side, Oden is bringing an important topic to light and presenting the bare bones of a thesis he hopes will be fleshed out by African and African-descent scholars. The early African roots of Christianity have been "white washed" and, in doing so, robbed a continent of its rich heritage. Tragically, Oden is an extremely disorganized writer. He is clearly educated and articulate as well as passionate about his topic, but his writing style is non-linear in the extreme. The result is that he presents information out of sequence and needs to repeat facts to reorient the reader so s/he can try to hang on to where the new facts fit into the scope of the material. Even allowing for the cluster/matrix/constellation nature of the evidence Oden presents doesn't compensate for the fact that he would have benefited tremendously from a good detailed outline before he started typing. Additionally, Oden is a little skimpy on the citations. I don't distrust his information and he's he's clearly done his research, but a scholarly work should be more consistent in citing sources. Overall, I can't fault the content or the scholarship, but be prepared to spend time trying to figure out where and when you are in the timeline and relationships between individuals.
Kupidon
When I started looking for early Christian history, I was disappointed by Adolf Harnack's dismissiveness of Eastern Christian History, and frustrated by the difficulty finding other sources (although, I've found more since). After reading W.H.C. Frend's Early Christian Archeology, I realized for the first time the vast opportunity for extending and continuing research and publishing in the field of Early Christianity. I aspired to do some of that work myself. Thomas C. Oden's The African Memory of Mark: Reassessing Early Church Tradition is the first published work I have read to challenge the Euro-centric, history of Christianity, and starts to give us a well-footnoted account of what happened in Africa after the apostolic Pentecost. This book is such a joy and a relief to read! Instinctively I have have known where one ought to look for the data, and what would be there, and, look!, here it is!

Thomas Oden takes us in to the continent of Africa, into the cities we've read about, down the streets, and past the buildings, into the archives and offices of the Coptic Church. Here the protected and cherished treasures of nearly two millenia have been preserved, and Oden gains access to the ancient books, and manuscripts and the Coptic hierarchs whose faithful stewardship have guarded these early witnesses. Oden crafts the timeline, weaves the threads of historical witness, and the African memory of Mark's apostolic journeys and leadership into a compelling tapestry of the establishment of Christianity in Egypt in the first century.

Oden poses a lot of questions, good questions, the questions that are forming in your mind as you read. He seems to tease us with the the substance of the puzzle pieces as he connects them, and at the same time entices and challenges us to join him in the detective work of this rare and amazing period in history. His unanswered questions describe the missing pieces.

Sometimes the text is repetitive, but remembering that Oden is a professor, and a teacher, he knows that repetition will cement key bits of information in our minds, tug at our curiosity, and perhaps compel one of us to get up out of our comfy chair, and pack our bags, because we want to learn the languages, build relationships with people in the African countries, gain access to archives, begin digging in the sand for more sources, and tell more of these powerful, hidden stories of Early African Christianity to others.

Read this book. Be surprised by the story Thomas Oden has to tell. Be inspired, the fields are ripe and the laborers are few.
sobolica
This book was recommended to me by our pastor. I had never heard or read anything about this phase of Mark's life ministry which is not even mentioned in Scripture., I have had some considerable post graduate Biblical and theological education but have never been introduced to this part of Mark's story.
Kendis
While "The African Memory of Mark" by Thomas C. Oden is meant to increase our understanding of the role St Mark played in the early church, this work is burdened with so much unnecessary minutiae and with Oden's opinions on what young Africans should do now that it becomes hard to soldier on to the end of the work. I didn't.
This is a subject worth exploring but I recommend finding other sources.
lacki
An outstanding presentation of the early church that's little known to the West. The philosophies of history promulgated in
Europe and America in the 20th century discounted anything that happened in the early church. We need to rediscover the patristic theologians, particularly those in Africa. The church did not begin in Rome, but rather in Alexandria and Cyrene. JW
Nilabor
I believe the Dr. Oden is a great writer. I also listened to his lectures at Dallas theological seminary about early Christianity in Libya. As a Coptic Orthodox Christian since birth, I smell the aroma of the church father teachings in Dr. Oden's writings. I believe his books are a must-read for every christian who wants to live the early christian history in the twenty first century.
Cozius
Eastern thinking and African thinking are not close to being the same. Thomas Oden has given scholarship and his experiences a persuasive argument for Biblical students (I am one) to rethink what they have been taught from their earliest training. With this book one must have a fairly good background in history stretching forward from about 2500 years ago.
The book is well written in understandable layman's language. The author presents an Insightful, thought-provoking work with a new twist on how we might define history. It was indeed an eye opening journey for me in a previously uncharted space.