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by Jacob Milgrom
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Bible Study & Reference
  • Author:
    Jacob Milgrom
  • ISBN:
    0300140568
  • ISBN13:
    978-0300140569
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Yale University Press (December 5, 2000)
  • Pages:
    656 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Bible Study & Reference
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After this we come to the exegesis of Lev. 17-22, The Slaughter and Consumption of Meat (Lev 17), Illicit Sexual Practices (Lev 18), Ritual and Moral Holiness (Lev 19), Penalties for Molek Worship, Necromancy, and Sexual Offenses (Lev 20), Instruction for Priests (Lev 21), and Instructions for the Priests and for Lay Persons (Lev 22).

17-22, I briefly outlined the theology that Milgrom believes animates H and therefore I won't repeat it here. One of Milgrom's most notable qualities is his thoroughness.

Jacob Milgrom, a rabbi and Bible scholar, has devoted the bulk of his career to. .Leviticus 17–22 brings us to the heart of the book.

Jacob Milgrom, a rabbi and Bible scholar, has devoted the bulk of his career to examining the laws of the Torah. It provides an authoritative and comprehensive explanation of ethical values concealed in Israel’s rituals. These chapters focus mainly on the practice of holiness required of laity and priest alike.

Tanakh ~ Old Testament ~ Hebrew Bible. 3a. ISBN 978-0-3001-4056-9. Intertestamental Books ~ Apocrypha.

In Leviticus 17-22 world-class Bible scholar and rabbi Jacob Milgrom shows. ISBN13:9780300140569. Release Date:December 2000.

These chapters focus mainly on the practice of holiness required of laity and priest alike. The Commandments that lead to holiness are detailed in Chapter 19, the core of the book, if not the whole Torah. The Anchor Yale Bible is a project of international and interfaith scope in which Protestant, Catholic, and Jewish scholars from many countries contribute individual volumes. The project is not sponsored by any ecclesiastical organization and is not intended to reflect any particular theological doctrine.

Like the best-selling Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary, the Anchor Yale Bible . Several Bible books are covered over the course of multiple volumes

Top Protestant, Catholic and Jewish scholars have all brought their skills to bear on the Old and New Testaments, as well as the Apocrypha. Several Bible books are covered over the course of multiple volumes. This speaks to the depth of the scholarship represented in the AYBC.

Leviticus 17-22 Jacob Milgrom. Jacob Milgrom is Emeritus Professor of Hebrew Bible at the University of California, Berkeley, and a widely published author. His books include Studies in Levitical Terminology (1970), Cult and Conscience (1976), Numbers (1990), and Leviticus (3 vols.

The Decisive Battles of World History. 03 MB·68,150 Downloads.

Jacob Milgrom, a rabbi and Bible scholar, has devoted the bulk of his career to examining the laws of the Torah

Jacob Milgrom, a rabbi and Bible scholar, has devoted the bulk of his career to examining the laws of the Torah. Leviticus 23-27 brings us to the climactic end of the book and its revolutionary innovations, among which are the evolution of the festival calendar with its emphasis on folk traditions, and the jubilee, the priestly answer to the socio-economic problems of their time. Categories: Religion.

This volume is a new translation, introduction and commentary on the book of law that shaped the religion in Israel.

Pemand
You can read my full review here: http://wp.me/p3JhRp-tX
Buy from this Amazon link (it's cheaper): http://amzn.to/1OTJgF9

Jacob Milgrom taught at the University of California, Berkeley and headed the Department of Near Eastern Studies. He was most known for his research on Biblical purity laws and was a (or ‘the’) leading expert on Leviticus (according to Longman). He wrote the Leviticus volume for the Anchor Yale Bible Commentary series, which turned into three volumes: Leviticus 1-16 (1184 pages, Vol 3), Lev. 17-22 (656 pages, Vol 3A), and Lev. 23-27 (848 pages, Vol 3B). This volume picks up right where Vol 3 left off.

Outline
Milligram provides a brief Outline and Translation of the whole book of Exodus. He then covers the Structure, Vocabulary, Extent, and Date of Leviticus 17-22. He believes that these chapters are part of Holiness (H) Source. They are distinguished from the first 16 chapters which are part of the Priestly (P) Source. Milgrom is quite conservative in his stance on Scripture. He insists that (P) was written much earlier than its usual date (ca. 500 BC).

Next up is the Theology section. This portion covers topics like the Sinaitic and Patriarchal Covenants, Holiness, Ethics, Land, Sabbath, Jubilee and Redemption, Israelites, The Missing King, Crime and Punishment, and more. Here you can tell that Milgrom has put in the hours into Leviticus as his comments on theology are incredible.

After this we come to the exegesis of Lev. 17-22, The Slaughter and Consumption of Meat (Lev 17), Illicit Sexual Practices (Lev 18), Ritual and Moral Holiness (Lev 19), Penalties for Molek Worship, Necromancy, and Sexual Offenses (Lev 20), Instruction for Priests (Lev 21), and Instructions for the Priests and for Lay Persons (Lev 22). In each of the exegetical chapters there is a repeated Translation of the text, the Composition of the chapter (only with Lev 17), Notes (covering the terms and phrases of the text), and Comments (covering broader issues within the chapter [like 'Holiness' in Lev. 19]). The Bibliography and Index are not included in this volume, but are found in 3B.

Summary
As thick as Milgrom’s commentary is, there isn’t always the theological explanations I wish there were. When discussing ‘Horticultural Holiness’ in 19.23-25 (1677-1684), Milgrom reviews ANE literature, interpretations of the Jewish rabbis, Qumran literature, the Dead Sea Scrolls, and contemporary commentators and discusses the various interpretations of the text here (and throughout the rest of the commentary too, a big plus!). Though stating that waiting a few years to eat the fruit of the land had practical implications (the roots sink deep into the soil, giving the trunk the strength it needs to bear up the amount of fruit [1684]), there’s no discussion on why Israel would be commanded to do this.

But I understand that Milgrom can't cover everything. Perhaps he does give an explanation somewhere within his commentary, but with no index until Vol. 3B, I can't lookup other discussions of Lev. 19.23-25. Yet even still, one should not think that Milgrom doesn't care about the text in the daily life of the ancient Israelite. He goes to great lengths through out the commentary to show the why's and the how's of a law or command.
Recommended?

To the serious student and pastor who know a good deal of Hebrew and to the OT scholar who will certainly have knowledge on Hebrew, ANE studies, and the methodology of source criticism, these three volumes (though I’ve only reviewed the second, 3A) would be important to own since, as Longman has expressed, Milgrom was "clearly the world’s leading expert on Leviticus" (OT Commentary Survey, 33).

[Special thanks to Yale University Press for allowing me to review this book! I was not obligated to provide a positive review in exchange for this book].
Xig
You can read my full review here: http://wp.me/p3JhRp-tX
Buy from this Amazon link (it's cheaper): http://amzn.to/1OTJgF9

Jacob Milgrom taught at the University of California, Berkeley and headed the Department of Near Eastern Studies. He was most known for his research on Biblical purity laws and was a (or ‘the’) leading expert on Leviticus (according to Longman). He wrote the Leviticus volume for the Anchor Yale Bible Commentary series, which turned into three volumes: Leviticus 1-16 (1184 pages, Vol 3), Lev. 17-22 (656 pages, Vol 3A), and Lev. 23-27 (848 pages, Vol 3B). This volume picks up right where Vol 3 left off.

Outline
Milligram provides a brief Outline and Translation of the whole book of Exodus. He then covers the Structure, Vocabulary, Extent, and Date of Leviticus 17-22. He believes that these chapters are part of Holiness (H) Source. They are distinguished from the first 16 chapters which are part of the Priestly (P) Source. Milgrom is quite conservative in his stance on Scripture. He insists that (P) was written much earlier than its usual date (ca. 500 BC).

Next up is the Theology section. This portion covers topics like the Sinaitic and Patriarchal Covenants, Holiness, Ethics, Land, Sabbath, Jubilee and Redemption, Israelites, The Missing King, Crime and Punishment, and more. Here you can tell that Milgrom has put in the hours into Leviticus as his comments on theology are incredible.

After this we come to the exegesis of Lev. 17-22, The Slaughter and Consumption of Meat (Lev 17), Illicit Sexual Practices (Lev 18), Ritual and Moral Holiness (Lev 19), Penalties for Molek Worship, Necromancy, and Sexual Offenses (Lev 20), Instruction for Priests (Lev 21), and Instructions for the Priests and for Lay Persons (Lev 22). In each of the exegetical chapters there is a repeated Translation of the text, the Composition of the chapter (only with Lev 17), Notes (covering the terms and phrases of the text), and Comments (covering broader issues within the chapter [like 'Holiness' in Lev. 19]). The Bibliography and Index are not included in this volume, but are found in 3B.

Summary
As thick as Milgrom’s commentary is, there isn’t always the theological explanations I wish there were. When discussing ‘Horticultural Holiness’ in 19.23-25 (1677-1684), Milgrom reviews ANE literature, interpretations of the Jewish rabbis, Qumran literature, the Dead Sea Scrolls, and contemporary commentators and discusses the various interpretations of the text here (and throughout the rest of the commentary too, a big plus!). Though stating that waiting a few years to eat the fruit of the land had practical implications (the roots sink deep into the soil, giving the trunk the strength it needs to bear up the amount of fruit [1684]), there’s no discussion on why Israel would be commanded to do this.

But I understand that Milgrom can't cover everything. Perhaps he does give an explanation somewhere within his commentary, but with no index until Vol. 3B, I can't lookup other discussions of Lev. 19.23-25. Yet even still, one should not think that Milgrom doesn't care about the text in the daily life of the ancient Israelite. He goes to great lengths through out the commentary to show the why's and the how's of a law or command.
Recommended?

To the serious student and pastor who know a good deal of Hebrew and to the OT scholar who will certainly have knowledge on Hebrew, ANE studies, and the methodology of source criticism, these three volumes (though I’ve only reviewed the second, 3A) would be important to own since, as Longman has expressed, Milgrom was "clearly the world’s leading expert on Leviticus" (OT Commentary Survey, 33).

[Special thanks to Yale University Press for allowing me to review this book! I was not obligated to provide a positive review in exchange for this book].