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Download After the Apple: Women in the Bible: Women In the Bible - Timeless Stories of Love, Lust, and Longing fb2

by Naomi H Rosenblatt
Download After the Apple: Women in the Bible: Women In the Bible - Timeless Stories of Love, Lust, and Longing fb2
Bible Study & Reference
  • Author:
    Naomi H Rosenblatt
  • ISBN:
    0786869089
  • ISBN13:
    978-0786869084
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Miramax (March 23, 2005)
  • Pages:
    288 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Bible Study & Reference
  • Language:
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    1417 kb
  • ePUB format
    1171 kb
  • DJVU format
    1761 kb
  • Rating:
    4.5
  • Votes:
    829
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This is the only time the Bible notes that a woman has fallen in love. The Bible depicts her favorably, with the possible exception when she criticizes her husband David for dancing almost naked in front of crowds of people. But David is never pictured as treating her well.

This is the only time the Bible notes that a woman has fallen in love. David and Michal are locked into the Bible's most unhappy marriage, and the biblical narrator does not shrink from exposing the raw edges of their private life

After the Apple book. As a woman who wanted to hear and understand the stories of these underloved heroes, I was sorely disappointed in teh sexualization and lack of care these women are given

After the Apple book. As a woman who wanted to hear and understand the stories of these underloved heroes, I was sorely disappointed in teh sexualization and lack of care these women are given. Esther's tale is labeled an act of seduction. eyeroll ) While technically well written, the themes are insulting and I will not recommend this book to anyone. Apr 09, 2019 Lara rated it really liked it. I enjoyed reading this different perspective of the bible.

Women in the Bible - Timeless Stories of Love, Lust, and Longing. After the Apple provides lessons for today. com User, July 28, 2005

In a powerful blend of history, psychology, and storytelling, Naomi Rosenblatt reinterprets the stories of the women of the Old Testament. After the Apple : Women in the Bible - Timeless Stories of Love, Lust, and Longing. by Naomi Harris Rosenblatt. com User, July 28, 2005.

Retells the stories of Leah, Rachel, Sarah, Rebeccah, Delilah, and Jezebel .

Retells the stories of Leah, Rachel, Sarah, Rebeccah, Delilah, and Jezebel, examining their relevance to the Bible and its teachings.

After the Apple: Women in the Bible. by Naomi H. Rosenblatt. Published March 23, 2005 by Miramax. There's no description for this book yet. After the Apple: Women in the Bible. 1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read. Are you sure you want to remove After the Apple: Women in the Bible from your list? After the Apple: Women in the Bible. Women in the bible - timeless stories of love, lust, and longing. IT ALL STARTED WITH EVE, the mother of us all. The Physical Object.

Naomi Harris Rosenblatt. Download PDF book format. Choose file format of this book to download: pdf chm txt rtf doc. Download this format book. After the apple : women in the bible : timeless stories of love, lust, and longing Naomi Harris Rosenblatt. Book's title: After the apple : women in the bible : timeless stories of love, lust, and longing Naomi Harris Rosenblatt. International Standard Book Number (ISBN): 0786869089. ISBN: 9280811282 (pb.

The Bible often says little about women, or says it tersely-not indicating, for example, how a woman might have felt about having her only son nearly sacrificed. There’s now something of a cottage-industry in retelling these women’s stories, filling in the gaps, doing, if you will, modern-day Midrash. Here, marriage counselor and psychoanalyst Rosenblatt offers reflections on 17 women from Hebrew Scripture, all cast in an encouraging light.

Автор: Rosenblatt, Naomi H Название: After the Apple: Women in the Bible Издательство . Lively yet profound, poignant yet joyous, The Book of Love is a triumph of intellect and imagination: a personal discourse on love that is both novel and timeless.

Lively yet profound, poignant yet joyous, The Book of Love is a triumph of intellect and imagination: a personal discourse on love that is both novel and timeless.

The following is a list of women found in the Hebrew and Christian Bibles. Abigail – mother of Amasa, Sister of David. I Chronicles 2:15-17. Abigail – wife of the wicked Nabal, who became a wife of David after. Abigail – wife of the wicked Nabal, who became a wife of David after Nabal's death. I Samuel 25. Abihail – wife of Abishur and mother of Ahban and Molid. Abihail - wife of king Rehoboam II Chronicles. Abishag – concubine of aged King David. Abital – one of King David's wives II Samuel; I Chronicles.

There is Eve, the first rebel; Sarah, the founding mother of the people of Israel; the wickedly cunning Jezebel; the mysterious Queen of Sheba; and several more unforgettable characters. Each chapter unfolds the story of a brave woman making her way in a fiercely patriarchal society, using w its and wiles to survive in an often complicated and dangerous world.

In a powerful blend of history, psychology, and storytelling, Naomi Rosenblatt reinterprets the stories of the women of the Old Testament. Through her lens, we view these women with a new understanding, marveling at the very modern dilemmas and problems they confronted. Women everywhere will recognize their own struggles to love, to mother, to succeed in relationships, and to survive their way through a complicated world.

Mr.mclav
Ms. Rosenblatt's excellent book has enriched my study of the Old Testament as well as my study of psychotherapy. As a 56 y/o grandma, I had become somewhat "ho hum" over the Old Testament stories; her obvious affection for these characters from the Torah and her insight of the women as people with great initiative and courage, rather than the passive creatures they have been portrayed in the past, has ignited my interest once more and made me see them with new eyes.

I also have Ms. Rosenblatt's tapes of "In God's Image" which I listen to whenever I have to go somewhere in the car. I recommend them highly, as well.

I intend to recommend her books and tapes to the other students in my class at Corban College. Through her eyes, these two-dimensional characters from Bible text, our spiritual forebearers, have come alive once more in my imagination.

Here's hoping she will write many more books.
Puchock
I loved this book.It was wonderful,I higly recommend this book to scholars of the Divine Feminine and Biblical Scholarship.This gives the women of the Bible a wonderful overview.It is a positive and humanizing way to look at the Matriarchs of the Jewish Faith and Christian as well.Angela Miller.
lolike
This is a fascinating book--well written and filled with great insights. I am learning so much from Naomi's stories of great women in the Bible.
Rarranere
A great book - we're using it as the basis of our women's bible study! Offers a "fresh" and different perspective on the stories we've heard before.
Andronrad
I bought this book for my church book club. We had a lively discussion about it and are continuing it for 2 months. However, I found it not an easy read and thought it a little repetitive.
Purebinder
I enjoyed reading about these amazingly smart and committed women of the Bible. Their lesson's for living can work for us today too. Their strength and integrity can empower us through life's tough times.
Fordredor
Dr. Naomi Harris Rosenblatt examines the biblical report of the lives and activities of seventeen biblical women in her well-researched, insight-filled, and frequently innovative reading of biblical tales in her 2005 book After the Apple. The women lived as second-class citizens under the authority and control of men: fathers, husbands, and male-dominated culture. Yet, she sees women playing decisive roles during the two-thousand year history chronicled in the Hebrew Bible. The women are intelligent, brave, assertive, unwilling to be passive in the face of overwhelming circumstances. "What I find particularly intriguing about the women is that most of them circumvent male authority in a patriarchal society, and some even subvert it," and none, other than Jezebel, is punished for her unconventional conduct.

Unlike generations of male commentators, Rosenblatt understands the initial tale of Eve leading Adam to eat the forbidden fruit as God teaching "us about the exercise of free will, the need to be responsible for the consequences of our actions." Eve is not the "disobedient seductress who led innocent Adam astray, thus bringing pain and suffering - and death - to all mankind.... Eve's sole motivation is curiosity, the starting point that leads to the pursuit of knowledge and, eventually to wisdom." She was a hero. She was "a risk-taker, a woman who dares to question the limitations imposed on her and her helpmate. She is driven by the need to create new life. She is the one who determines the future of humankind." While Adam is passive, she takes action. She is an example for everyone.

Rosenblatt sees Sara as a hero. When a famine struck Canaan, the patriarch Abraham decided to travel to Egypt for food. He knew his wife was beautiful and feared that Egyptians would kill him if they knew Sara was his wife when they would kidnap and have their way with her. He told her to say she is his sister so that when they take her, as he expected they would, they wouldn't kill him. Rosenblatt believes that the decision for Sarah to submit to the expected sexual encounter was considered by husband and wife and was "mutual: a deliberate, wrenching sacrifice (be Sarah) to which they both agreed.... The key to (Sarah's) character is her personal strength," her willingness to sacrifice herself for her husband. Since Scripture does not deny it, Rosenblatt feels certain that Pharaoh had sex with her.

Hagar, Abraham's concubine, is also heroic. After being banished from her home with Abraham and Sarah, "God recognizes the strength of Hagar's bond to her son and sends an angel who" tells her "I will make a great nation of him." So, too, Rebecca, who realizes that despite her husband's love of Esau, his brother Jacob deserved the blessing, not Esau, and found a way to secure the blessing for him. Rosenblatt also describes the courage, fearlessness, and daring of Rachel, Jacob's first wife, Tamar and Ruth who seduced men to gain what belonged to them, Delilah who understood the psychology of Samson and developed a strategy to overcome him, Bathsheba who cajoled King David her husband to make her son Solomon king, and even Jezebel who devised an evil plan to secure a field for her husband, although it was against the law, as well as other women with pluck.

Rosenblatt finds the Hebrew bible showing women respect. In the unhappy conflicts involving Abraham's wife and concubine, and his grandson Jacob's two wives and two concubines "the Bible demonstrates a preference for monogamy by detailing the miseries of polygamy. Polygamy reduces the humanity of women and "is shown to dilute the intensity of feeling that is possible only between one man and one woman."

"Michal, King Saul's youngest daughter, achieves a rare distinction. The Bible says, `Now Michal daughter of Saul had fallen in love with David.' This is the only time the Bible notes that a woman has fallen in love." The Bible depicts her favorably, with the possible exception when she criticizes her husband David for dancing almost naked in front of crowds of people. But David is never pictured as treating her well. "David and Michal are locked into the Bible's most unhappy marriage, and the biblical narrator does not shrink from exposing the raw edges of their private life." Rosenblatt sees this as a biblical message, "we must not take a spouse's feelings for granted, however just we feel our cause to be."

"The stories of the women in the Hebrew Bible," she concludes, "offer us a prism through which to consider our own lives" and encourages us to act.
This book is not something I would normally buy or read but I did because it was given to me as a gift. I was expecting a religious book full of stereotypes, self-righteous lectures, condemnations and judgments. It is not an exaggeration to say not only I was pleasantly surprised by this book but also I was blown away by the content as well as the author's critique of the events.

The book is about fourteen women from the Hebrew Bible. Their stories, quoted from the same book, are followed by the author's interpretation of the events and the critique of people's behaviors in each story. I was pleasantly surprised with the writing style which sounds unbiased, gentle and loving instead of coming from judgment and condemnation of the characters or the events, like one would expect from a religious book. The author's interpretation of the events, people's motives and human condition is not only from a contemporary view point but priceless. After adding her in depth knowledge of the subject matter, you end up with an amazing book, even for someone who doesn't know about the Christian or the Hebrew Bible.