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by James Limburg
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Bible Study & Reference
  • Author:
    James Limburg
  • ISBN:
    0664228526
  • ISBN13:
    978-0664228521
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Westminster John Knox Press (January 1, 1993)
  • Pages:
    124 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Bible Study & Reference
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1778 kb
  • ePUB format
    1685 kb
  • DJVU format
    1651 kb
  • Rating:
    4.9
  • Votes:
    845
  • Formats:
    docx lit mbr txt


Old Testament Library.

Old Testament Library. The contributors are scholars of international standing. Carol A. Newsom, Charles Howard Candler Professor of Old Testament, Candler School of Theology at Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia.

The Old Testament Library. Westminster/John Knox Press, Louisville, 1993. Westminster John Knox, Louisville, 2009.

As with any series that reaches this level of respectability, it is comprehensive in scope while acknowledging that it is not exhaustive. Introductory matters cover historical concerns, cultural issues, the reception of the text, the integrity of the text, and other interpretive issues.

In Jonah, James Limburg examines Jonah with several questions in. .

In Jonah, James Limburg examines Jonah with several questions in mind: How did the story originate? What is its place in the Bible? . He also keeps in mind the literary dimension of the text and takes great care to follow the divisions of the book as they were defined by Jewish scribal tradition.

The Old Testament (abbreviated OT) is the first part of the Christian biblical canon, which is based primarily upon the twenty-four books of the Hebrew Bible (or Tanakh), a collection of ancient religious Hebrew writings by the Israelites believed b.

Anders, Max E. & Butler, Trent C. Hosea–Micah. B&H Publishing, 2005). Old Testament Library. Westminster John Knox, 2001). Birch, Bruce C. Hosea, Joel & Amos. Yale University Press, 1995).

Richard J. Clifford, . is Visiting Professor of Old Testament at Boston College School of Theology and Ministry in Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts. A former President of Weston Jesuit School of Theology, he was Founding Dean of the Boston College School of Theology and Ministry from 2008-2010. Series: The Old Testament Library.

Verse by verse Christadelphian exposition of the book of Jonah by.

Verse by verse Christadelphian exposition of the book of Jonah by Duncan Heaster.

The KJV New Testament was translated from the Textus Receptus. However, the majority of the book of Revelation seems to have been translated from the Latin Vulgate.

Old Testament: Genesis Exodus Leviticus Numbers Deuteronomy Joshua Judges Ruth 1 Samuel 2 Samuel 1 Kings 2 Kings 1Chronicles 2 Chronicles Ezra Nehemiah Esther Job Psalms Proverbs Ecclesiastes (Qoheleth) Canticles (Song of Solomon) Isaiah Jeremiah Lamentations Ezekiel Daniel Hosea Joel Amos Obadiah Jonah Micah Nahum Habakkuk Zephaniah Haggai Zechariah Malachi. The KJV New Testament was translated from the Textus Receptus.

In this volume, James Limburg examines Jonah with several questions in mind: How did the story originate? What is its place in the Bible? How did the New Testament understand the story? How has the story been understood in Judaism and in Islam? What might it mean for people today? And what does it have to say about God, about the human condition, and even about God and nature? In reviewing the book, Limburg gives special attention to the many contributions of artists, musicians, painters, and sculptors who, he says, may have been the best interpreters of Jonah. He also keeps in mind the literary dimension of the text and takes great care to follow the divisions of the book as they were defined by Jewish scribal tradition.

The Old Testament Library provides fresh and authoritative treatments of important aspects of Old Testament study through commentaries and general surveys. The contributors are scholars of international standing.


Vaua
This book was an exceptionally good and concise commentary on the Book of Jonah. Though I must state that the author is writing from the view of "didactic fiction" meaning that he views the Book of Jonah as based on a historical figure and life, but not a record of literal history. I disagree with him on that conceptualization of the Book of Jonah, but since that is a background issue I was not constantly bothered by it. The author simply stated his position and, for the most part, left it alone.

I believe the Book of Jonah to be historical narrative since God is the main Character along with Jonah. To see the book of Jonah as any type of fiction would be similar to saying that God could not have decreed those miraculous events throughout the book to happen as they did. God does many things in history that are for His people's benefit and learning that involves all kinds of miracles. Why should the Book of Jonah be any different, especially since Jesus Himself spoke about it and compared His death to Jonah in the fish?

The whole commentary was very insightful with its picture of what God is saying in the Book of Jonah. The information presented covered context, dating, purpose, and interpretation of Jonah. Every chapter stepped through each verse of the book and provided a clear presentation of various view points throughout history as well as the authors own position.

The end of the book has an appendix that deals with the interpretation of the Book of Jonah in Judaism, Islam, first century AD lit., apocryphal books, and the Reformers.

Overall it was enjoyable to read and it did not place the text in constant doubt of being Christian Scripture inspired by God, Himself. This was well worth the time for anyone who loves the story of Jonah.
Heraly
Great commentary! Not so scholarly as to split hairs over a word, but makes it very easy to apply to today. I would recommend it for an in depth study of Jonah!
Mogelv
It's great book.
Pruster
The author succinctly states most of the issues concerning the book. In controversy, he takes a wise, measured approach to his own opinion, representing all other opinions as well.
Redfury
I'm reviewing this commentary in mind for the exegete rather than the person who's looking for a devotional read through Jonah. To that end, it was surprisingly good and I thought this volume was the best critical commentary on the book of Jonah. Plenty of insights that are given above the usual obvious observation, especially at the greater syntactical and structural level of the book. It is part of the Old Testament Library commentary series, and my previous exposure to some of the volumes in this set has made me biased against this particular volume. However, this is a good example of why exegetes must weigh each individual commentary on it's own merit rather than the series as a whole--for even good series have it's weak volumes, and vice versa. The author James Limburg clearly loves the story of Jonah, who have even made it a hobby of his to visit different locations of Europe with artistic references to Jonah. This passion spills over into his commentary. Some notes of caution about this volume for the conservative expositor: Limburg believes that Jonah was written long after Nineveh was destroyed (Limburg, 78). That might be a rather trivial point compared to the fact that Limburgh does not believe the events of Jonah ever happened (Limburgh, 24). Yet despite this problem, he manages to draw out very good exegetical insight of the text itself. Ironically, Limburg does a good job defending the prayer of Jonah 2 as being part of the original composition of the text rather than the liberal game of redaction criticism, etc. I've also appreciated his appendix that provided a survey of the impact and references to it historically in the Apocrypha, first century literature (Josephus), Rabbinic Judiasm, Islam and the Protestant reformation. The most intriguing survey in the appendix for me personally was seeing just how whacky Rabbinic hermeneutics and embellishment can get.