Download Woman of Valor fb2

by Ellen Chesler
Download Woman of Valor fb2
Specific Groups
  • Author:
    Ellen Chesler
  • ISBN:
    0385469802
  • ISBN13:
    978-0385469807
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Anchor; 1st Printing edition (May 1, 1993)
  • Pages:
    639 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Specific Groups
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1210 kb
  • ePUB format
    1184 kb
  • DJVU format
    1825 kb
  • Rating:
    4.3
  • Votes:
    498
  • Formats:
    doc txt docx mbr


Ellen Chesler's 1992 biography of Margaret Sanger is acclaimed as definitive and is widely used and cited by scholars and activists alike in the fields of women's health and reproductive rights

Ellen Chesler's 1992 biography of Margaret Sanger is acclaimed as definitive and is widely used and cited by scholars and activists alike in the fields of women's health and reproductive rights. Chesler's substantive new Afterword considers how Sanger's life and work hold up in light of subsequent developments.

Chesler's substantive new Afterword considers how Sanger's life and work hold up in light of subsequent developments, such as . Supreme Court cases challenging the constitutional Ellen Chesler's 1992 biography of Margaret Sanger is acclaimed as definitive and is widely used and cited by scholars and activists alike in the fields of women's health and reproductive rights.

Woman of Valor - Ellen Chesler. Ellen Chesler has written an extraordinary biography of a remarkable woman. Sanger is surely one of the most influential-and controversial-women of the century. Praise for Woman of Valor. Woman of Valor shows us a zesty, authentic heroine who kept on evolving personally and politically, as we all must. I found fascinating lessons for feminists today in Margaret Sanger’s struggle for reproductive autonomy. Chesler illuminates Sanger’s rich personal and public life with a sophisticated understanding of psychology and history, yet the book reads like a good novel. Sylvia A. Law, Professor of Law, New York University.

Now, Ellen Chesler provides an authoritative and widely acclaimed biography of this great emancipator, whose lifelong struggle helped women gain control over their own bodies

Now, Ellen Chesler provides an authoritative and widely acclaimed biography of this great emancipator, whose lifelong struggle helped women gain control over their own bodies. An idealist who mastered practical politics, Sanger seized on contraception as the key to redistributing power to women in the bedroom, the home, and the community. For fifty years, she battled formidable opponents ranging from the US Government to the Catholic Church. Her crusade was both passionate and paradoxical.

nt too, or encapsulated several.

nt too, or encapsulated several experiences into one for dramatic effect, but a substantial shift in public consciousness on the issue had, indeed, occurred during her absence. Newspapers and magazines had quite suddenly turned their attention to the birth control controversy. As Bill Sanger languished in a New York City jail, the prosecutors who had hoped to check birth control.

Ellen Chesler's 1992 biography of Margaret Sanger is acclaimed as definitive and is widely used and cited by scholars and activists alike in the fields of women's health and reproductive rights. Chesler's substantive new Afterword considers how Sanger's life and work hold up in light of subsequent developments, such as . Supreme Court cases challenging the constitutional doctrine. Authoritative, readable and rippling with the energy of the life it conveys

The traditional Sabbath prayer "A Woman of Valor" is said by the head of the household .

The traditional Sabbath prayer "A Woman of Valor" is said by the head of the household, usually referring to his wife, and includes the words: "A woman of valor who can find? For her price is far above rubies. Perhaps the inference is that the women who were "rebels and radicals" had lowered value in the traditional sense.

Ellen Chesler's 1992 biography of Margaret Sanger is acclaimed as definitive and is widely used and cited by scholars . Drawing on new information from archives and interviews, Chesler illuminates Margaret Sanger's turbulent personal story as well as the history of the birth control movement.

Ellen Chesler's 1992 biography of Margaret Sanger is acclaimed as definitive and is widely used and cited by scholars and activists alike in the fields of women's. An intimate biography of a visionary rebel, this is also an epic story that is indispensable reading for generations of women who take their reproductive and sexual freedoms for granted.

She lived long enough to become something of an institution, and Ellen Chesler’s biography, Women of Valor, thick as a marble slab and solemn as a statue, seems better suited to the Sanger than to the irreverent, lascivious bohemian who cavorted behind the public facade. Chesler, a better historian than psychologist, doesn’t quite know what to do with the numerous contradictions she has collected, but without them this would be a dull book. If her censorious vigilance in pouncing on bad influences and deviations from orthodoxy reminds you of someone in the book, it’s not Sanger but her puritanical nemesis, Anthony Comstock.

Drawing on new information from archives and interviews, Chesler illuminates Margaret Sanger's turbulent personal story as well as the history of the birth control movement.  An intimate biography of a visionary rebel, this is also an epic story that is indispensable reading for generations of women who take their reproductive and sexual freedoms for granted.

Shakanos
This is an easy to read yet comprehensive history of Margaret Sanger and the birth control movement in the U.S. One of the many things I learned was that in the early part of the 20th century millions of American women died as the result of complications and infections from self-induced abortions. I learned Margaret Sanger was a courageous woman who fought ingrained ignorance her whole life and devoted it to helping woman have control over their own bodies. She is considered one of the great American women of the 20th Century and called by some "the great emancipator" for women.
Shakataxe
Sanger has been maligned and vilified in the shadow of Catholicism, politics and male fear of women's abilities and contributions . Chesler seeks to right the scales of truth, documentation and justice. A worthy, scholarly read. Time lines are revisited to encompass world changes and complexities. Pay attention as dates change across the chapters that follow action and ideology.
Jusari
Very thorough and well documented. At times it gets a bit bogged down with details, but it's a very good account of a most interesting woman who made a huge contribution to reproductive health.
September
item arrived in excellent condition
Welen
Margaret Sanger (1879-1966) was born to an impoverished Roman Catholic family in Corning New York. Her family was large and she grew up A rebel against the strictures of late Victorian society. She never received a college degree, married a Jewish man named Bill Sanger by whom she had three children and moved to New York. Margaret became a left intellectual and became involved in birth control and family planning matters.
She opened a birth control clinic in New York City and was jailed several times for these activities. Sanger also became an advocate of eugenics and believe n the superiority of the white race.
Her life was unorthodox and she was sexually liberated. She had many lovers including such luminaries as Havelock Ellis, HG Wells and several others. Her marriage to an older man enabled her to enjoy wealth and the freedom of travel she enjoyed. She advocated the use of the diaphragm and condoms as well as other devices to prevent pregnancy. Sanger was an atheist who was a pretty Irish woman with red hair. She was a control artist who was tough and single sighted in her determination to make birth control a reality on the American scene. She is the undoubted champion of birth control advocates in American history.
Chesler has written a good definitive biography of Margaret Sanger. The book also gives us a good overview of social views held by the American public in the first part of the twentieth century. Whether you like or admire the work of Sangster it is important to learn more about this important woman.
Lo◘Ve
Meticulously researched and footnoted, this somewhat ponderous tome (about 670 pages including the notes and index) does not make for a quick beach read. It's fascinating to learn how very many of the rights modern women take for granted come from the work of this brave and dedicated woman, who began the movement and started the clinics that eventually morphed into Planned Parenthood, both in the USA and internationally.

People - even doctors - didn't even TALK about the phrase (ssssh) BIRTH CONTROL a hundred years ago. Sanger changed that, brought an awareness of the need to offer women reproductive choices other than abstinence, too many babies, or illegal and risky abortions.

Sanger's reputation has been much besmirched in the last few decades by those who hate that women are making their own choices as to when - or whether to become mothers. As Chesler presents her, Sanger was far from perfect; she made enemies as well as friends and supporters. She was loath to give up the glory/credit for work that others joined in as well. (Sanger may have been one of the earliest pioneers of name branding.)

Redheaded, witty and attractive, she did not believe in monogamy (at least for herself) and engaged in countless affairs, including one with writer H.G. Wells, somehow managing it that none of her men became jealous of her other lovers or husbands; they were all happy, or at least content, having a tiny bit of her time and attention. Whether you believe this disgustingly immoral or not, it's still an amazing feat for anyone to pull off. She was not a good mother, neglecting her children for the cause of B.C.

But she was not a supporter of Nazism, race eugenics, or racism - those are all LIES propagated by those with an axe to grind. She wasn't even really in favor of abortion, though she grudgingly agreed that in some cases there was a medical necessity.

This book will inform you of all you ever wanted to learn about Margaret Sanger (and more), and if you have a question or wonder how or why the author interpreted something, it's all deeply footnoted. The ending feels a bit rushed; perhaps because the author was conscious of it already being a very long book, or perhaps because Sanger made less news and had fewer letters and interviews in her declining years following several heart attacks. Worth the read, for anyone interested in women's history.
Ironrunner
It's a long biography, thoroughly researched. For that I'm grateful. I know I can rely on the information here. But, it does get to be a bit tedious of a read. Fortunately, the drive, dedication and determination of Ms. Sanger comes through all the minutia. Sometimes good, sometimes bad, but seldom indifferent, we pretty much find out who this woman was. Certainly she was a product of her times, as are we all, but also a champion of a most basic human right, to be free to control our own reproductive lives. I'm so glad to know Margaret Sanger and to have developed a deeper understanding of how precious reproductive freedom is.