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by Elizabeth Speller
Download The Sunlight on the Garden: A Family in Love, War and Madness fb2
Specific Groups
  • Author:
    Elizabeth Speller
  • ISBN:
    1862078297
  • ISBN13:
    978-1862078291
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Granta UK; First Edition edition (April 1, 2006)
  • Pages:
    256 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Specific Groups
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1925 kb
  • ePUB format
    1849 kb
  • DJVU format
    1992 kb
  • Rating:
    4.1
  • Votes:
    948
  • Formats:
    txt lit docx rtf


Speller's book is not quite a memoir but rather a record of the depression and other mental problems that her family . To read "The Sunlight in the Garden" is to clamber upon a magic carpet, which then swoops and dives through the decades and back again.

Speller's book is not quite a memoir but rather a record of the depression and other mental problems that her family members have suffered. It's also a story of the times - from about 1900 on. She's an excellent writer and she tells her story in a masterful way. The family members come alive in nuanced writing. This non chronological narrative works wonderfully well. The mothers and daughters of Elizabeth Speller's family are slowly and truthfully revealed to us, in all their fragility.

Электронная книга "The Sunlight On The Garden: A Family In Love, War And Madness", Elizabeth Speller. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "The Sunlight On The Garden: A Family In Love, War And Madness" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

I bought this book by mistake having read Elizabeth Speller's Novels - which were excellent Telling the story of Speller's family and the female line of madness down to her own experience, this is social history, loving and yet clear-eyed family narrative, and something.

I bought this book by mistake having read Elizabeth Speller's Novels - which were excellent. I am not ordinarily a reader of biographical type books but, as with her novels, Elizabeth has such an easy way about her that she can make the almost mundane seem interesting.

Speller’s dry wit is a pleasur. book that explores the social quagmire of the early 20th century’ - The Independent

Speller’s dry wit is a pleasur. book that explores the social quagmire of the early 20th century’ - The Independent. Speller’s writing style is mesmerising- by turns poetic, myth-shattering, funny and tragic’ - Easy Living. In 1880, Ada Curtis bore Gerald Howard, the first of several illegitimate children. Ada was a housemaid, the daughter of a Lincolnshire butcher. See all Product description.

Granta Books, 2 февр. In 1880, Ada Curtis bore Gerald Howard the first of several illegitimate children. Elizabeth Speller is a poet and journalist, and has written for the Observer, Independent on Sunday and Woman's Journal, and appeared on Radio 4. Her previous books include Athens: A New Guide, Granta City Guides Rome, published by Granta. She lives in Gloucestershire, and teaches poetry and creative writing at Lucy Cavendish College, Camb. Библиографические данные.

Elizabeth Speller is a poet and journalist, and has written for the Observer, Independent on Sunday and Woman's Journal, and appeared on Radio 4. Her previous books include Athens: A New Guide, Granta City Guides Rome, published by Granta

Elizabeth Speller is a poet and journalist, and has written for the Observer, Independent on Sunday and Woman's Journal, and appeared on Radio 4.

Speller addresses the ancient guilts that lie in her family as they do, undiscovered, in most. Mixed with blue blood she has gypsy, Jewish and merchant’s blood, and madness runs through all these strands. She finds that she is a genetic jigsaw. Speller shows how this was manifest in her mother.

A Family in Love, War and Madness. by Elizabeth Speller. Published April 1, 2006 by Granta UK. Written in English. Family, Social life and customs.

In 1880, Ada Curtis bore Gerald Howard the first of several illegitimate children. Gerald was her employer and the son of a once-grand family now obsessed with its own threadbare nobility. They thereby sent their descendants tumbling chaotically into the twentieth century.

Published by Granta Books. The Sunlight on the Garden: A Family in Love, War and Madness. Ultimately, this book will remain in the memory as a beautifully realised sequence of portraits of mothers and daughters. Other Titles of Interest. The Strange Fate of Kitty Easton.

In 1880, housemaid Ada Curtis bore the first of several illegitimate children from her employer, the son of a once-grand family now obsessed with its own threadbare nobility. More than a century later, inspired by the stories, re-inventions, and half-truths in her family's past, Elizabeth Speller—Gerald and Ada's great-granddaughter—sets out to trace the criss-crossing lines of their history. As she herself recovered from a mental breakdown, she began to wonder if that history offered any explanation of what had happened in her own life: What made my grandmother mad? What made us mad? The search resulted in a tale bringing vividly to life the passions and hopes of four generations, amid tales of wealth inherited and lost, eccentricity, sexual indiscretion, and madness.

Joni_Dep
This is a memoir of a dysfunctional family and of devastating mental illness. After reading the review I was expecting more from the book. I found it to be poorly written in parts and in need of a good editor. One example of her writing that should have been edited was " She was a handsome woman, and Gerald splashed out on a fashionable dress and but at the last minute Ada pinned a corsage of roses to her train." If you can get past some strange sentence structures the story itself is mostly an interesting memoir. I found it interesting as I had just finished reading "The Yellow Duster Sisters" which is an account of the author's mother and aunt as refugee children during WW11 in Rhodesia. To me, the book did not always flow well or have consistency and I found I was constantly having to turn back to the genealogy pages to keep up with who the characters were that she was mentioning. Initially, I almost gave up reading the book but kept at it as it did become better though the writing style did not always follow. If I had not read "The Yellow Duster Sisters" I probably would not have kept on reading the book but after finishing it I was glad I did. Her account of the grandmother's and her own mental illness is heavy and terribly sad.
Helo
Elizabeth Speller, author of a new WW1 novel, "The Return of Captain John Emmett", is also known for her non-fiction. In a book published in 2008, Speller writes about her family. Specifically, her mother's family and the last four generations. What has distinguished this family in the last 120 years or so are both the murkiness of connections in society and the mental problems of many of the family members. Speller's great-grandmother - from a poor family - became first the mistress and then the wife of a member of the Howard/Cavendish family. She gave birth to three children before the marriage - who were not acknowledged as family members - and then five or six after the marriage. Speller's grandmother was one of the younger - and luckier - children. Born in 1899, Joan Howard, educated in Switzerland prior to WW1, married the son of a wealthy department store owner, in 1922, and had three children. One of the three was Elizabeth Speller's mother.

Joan's marriage and family life was marred by severe mental problems. She was burned in an accident and spent time recovering. She was always conscience of her scars. During WW2, Joan and Eric sent Elizabeth's mother and aunt to live in South Africa. The parents separated and divorced and Joan became did war-duty with the Polish army-in-exile stationed in England. She fell in love with a Polish soldier who went back to Poland at war's end. Joan spent much of her life searching for...happiness, I suppose. She was put in a sanitarium and subjected to ECT, and, eventually, a partial lobotomy. Elizabeth, her granddaughter, born in 1951 as the oldest of three children, lived an eccentric life in 50's and 60's England. Schooled and unschooled, Elizabeth made choices that seemed not to bring her a great deal of stability. In the early 1980's, after the birth of two children, she fell apart and was committed to a sanitarium, suffering from crushing depression. Part of the book tells the often harrowing story of her eventual recovery and return to society.

Speller's book is not quite a memoir but rather a record of the depression and other mental problems that her family members have suffered. It's also a story of the times - from about 1900 on. She's an excellent writer and she tells her story in a masterful way. The family members come alive in nuanced writing. She includes a family tree in the front of the book to help confused readers.
Mightdragon
This is a lovely and lyrical memoir --beautiful prose. She traces the onset of her own madness with finnesse and in well documented genealogy. Her descriptions of her abuse and helplessness within the mental health system are right on the button. Yet she summons the strength to survive and make a new life for herself. I do wish she had given away more names of actors and "uppers" who were so given to wicked ways.