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by Alter Wiener
Download From a Name to a Number: A Holocaust Survivor's Autobiography fb2
Regional U.S.
  • Author:
    Alter Wiener
  • ISBN:
    1425997457
  • ISBN13:
    978-1425997458
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    AuthorHouse (April 2, 2007)
  • Pages:
    240 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Regional U.S.
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1158 kb
  • ePUB format
    1768 kb
  • DJVU format
    1972 kb
  • Rating:
    4.7
  • Votes:
    335
  • Formats:
    lit mobi doc azw


Like many other Holocaust survivors, I was focused on adjusting to a new life in a new country Several years ago I came upon the book " From a Name to a Number"in our library

Like many other Holocaust survivors, I was focused on adjusting to a new life in a new country. I had a full time job until the age of 73, and then I left New York for Oregon. I have never been able to bring down an iron curtain on my past. Several years ago I came upon the book " From a Name to a Number"in our library. His is a lesson from yesterday that must be made known to all of us for every background. To feel the pain that remains within him today surely becomes indelible in the mind and heart of each reader.

From a Name to a Number book. Alter Wiener is one of the very few Holocaust survivors still living in Portland, Oregon. Wiener's autobiography is a testimony to an unfolding tragedy taking place in WWII.

Alter Wiener is one of the very few Holocaust survivors still living in. .This book is not just Wiener's life story but it reveals many responses to his story.

Alter Wiener is one of the very few Holocaust survivors still living in Portland, Oregon. Alter Wiener's father was brutally murdered on September 11, 1939 by the German invaders of Poland. Hopefully, it will enable many readers to truly understand such levels of horror and a chance to empathize with the unique plight of the Holocaust victims.

The book is beautifully illustrated by the talented Craig Orback! It's an age-appropriate story for young readers (ages 8-12+) on the life lessons survivor Alter Wiener learned about the dangers of hatred, stereotyping, and prejudice and the power of kindness to change lives.

A DVD of the live presentations of Holocaust survivor, Alter Wiener. Estimated delivery Jul 2012. Other payment options.

Home Wiener, Alter From A Name to A Number: A Holocaust Survivor's Autobiography. From A Name to A Number: A Holocaust Survivor's Autobiography. ISBN 10: 1425997406, ISBN 13: 9781425997403. Alter was then a boy of 13. At the age of 15 he was deported to Blechhammer, a Forced Labor Camp for Jews, in Germany. He survived five camps. Upon liberation by the Russian Army on May 9, 1945, Alter weighed 80 lbs as reflected on the book's cover.

Wiener's autobiography. He survived five forced labor camps for Jews during WWII. Six four seven three five From a name to a number. Wiener, Alter, 1926-2018. Roots and my family in Chrzanów, Poland My childhood in Chrzanów, Poland The turning point in my life ion/incarceration Liberation from Nazi yoke and the ensuing odyssey Emigration Sharing my life story some noteworthy responses My answers to questions from the audience Epilogue.

Alter Wiener was one of the last Holocaust survivors in greater Portland, Oregon. Wiener detailed his experiences in a 2007 memoir, titled "From A Name to A Number: A Holocaust Survivor's Autobiography. CNN) A Holocaust survivor who was trying to make sure the world never forgot what happened fell short of finishing his life's work. Alter Wiener, a 92-year-old from outside Portland, Oregon, was struck and killed by a car on Tuesday evening, Hillsboro Police said. Wiener was one of the last remaining survivors in the Portland area, where he had lived since 2000.

Alter Wiener's father was brutally murdered on September 11, 1939 by the German invaders of Poland. Alter was then a boy of 13. At the age of 15 he was deported to Blechhammer, a Forced Labor Camp for Jews, in Germany. He survived five camps. Upon liberation by the Russian Army on May 9, 1945, Alter weighed 80 lbs as reflected on the book's cover. Alter Wiener is one of the very few Holocaust survivors still living in Portland, Oregon. He moved to Oregon in 2000 and since then he has shared his life story with over 800 audiences (as of April, 2013) in universities, colleges, middle and high schools, Churches, Synagogues, prisons, clubs, etc. He has also been interviewed by radio and TV stations as well as the press. Wiener's autobiography is a testimony to an unfolding tragedy taking place in WWII. Its message illustrates what prejudice may lead to and how tolerance is imperative. This book is not just Wiener's life story but it reveals many responses to his story. Hopefully, it will enable many readers to truly understand such levels of horror and a chance to empathize with the unique plight of the Holocaust victims. Feel free to visit my website www.alterwiener.com for more information including links.


Lonesome Orange Kid
Recently, I had the opportunity to meet with Alter Wiener the author of this story. First, in terms of the narrative of his story - it's truly phenomenal. Alter is honest about his experience - and doesn't sugarcoat any aspect of his life and how the holocaust has shaped his view of the world. I can't imagine the courage it takes for Alter to continue to share his story from an elementary school library to a high school gym. As a State Senator for Oregon, I will be working with Alter to introduce legislation to require attention be paid to holocaust and genocide education in Oregon. I know Alter reads every single one of these, so let me just say directly to my new friend - don't you dare think about leaving us yet...we have work to do!
Vetalol
I am writing this from my husband's account.

I don't know how you can give such a book anything other than 5 stars. Anyone who has the courage to tell the story of their experiences during the Holocaust should be honored for their bravery. Not only is the author brave in writing this book, he also used to come speak about his experiences for no cost. This is how I first became aware of his story, which I would never have known about otherwise.

The book is written much like the author speaks. I would say it is easy to read, but it's never easy to read about the horrors one human can inflict upon another. What really struck me about this memoir is that, even after surviving the Holocaust, the author can still see the humanity in others. Love and tolerance remain in the author's heart, which should be an inspiration to anyone who has ever suffered.

Mr. Wiener, thank you for writing this book and sharing it with the world. Especially in the current political climate, people need to remember your story and ensure it never happens again.
Meztisho
As time inevitably moves us away from the horrors and tragedies of the Holocaust and World War 2, it is imperative for our society to bear witness to the testimonies of the living "angels" of the darkest period in the history of mankind. Whether we do it through personal interactions or through print/online media, we must "never forget" by actively engaging in this responsibility. Mr. Alter Wiener presents us with a unique opportunity to not only relive his "life" during his teenage years through five concentration camps, but to read firsthand about the impact he has made during his "second life" on hundreds of people, young and old, who have heard his story firsthand. "From a Name to a Number" should be required reading for all high school age children and above. Mr. Wiener's personal account of his experiences and honest reflections on that time provide us with life lessons on how to interact with each other, how to deal with adversity, and how to never take for granted what we have and who we share our lives with. I highly recommend this book and give thanks to Mr. Wiener for sharing with us a window into his dark past that shines a bright light directing our society on right the path to a safer and more peaceful world.
Qumen
"From a Name to a Number" is a life-changing book. It is a story everyone should know, and should be a mandatory read worldwide! As a survivor of the Holocaust and the Nazi concentration camps, Alter Wiener tells a story of unthinkable horror with grace, dignity, courage and humor. He is a shining example of the best of humanity. And he teaches us lessons we all need for a better world view and a better understanding of ourselves. If I could give it 100 stars I would. Do yourself a favor, get this book, read it and take it into your heart. This book also inspired a children's book called "Gifts from the Enemy" by Trudy Ludwig. It teaches children humanity, love and acceptance. Another "must have."
BroWelm
Mr Wiener's book is a testimony to the ability of human beings to forgive and to transcend suffering and pain. His story is hard to read because it is difficult to accept to think that such events occurred and so recently. I pray this the rest of his days will be filled with peace and beauty and joy that were denied him in those terrible years. Please read this book and buy it as a gift to others; all our own problems seem petty and we called on to speak up for justice.