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by Henry Dunow
Download The Way Home: Scenes from a Season, Lessons from a Lifetime fb2
Regional U.S.
  • Author:
    Henry Dunow
  • ISBN:
    0767907337
  • ISBN13:
    978-0767907330
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Broadway; First Edition first Printing edition (May 15, 2001)
  • Pages:
    272 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Regional U.S.
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1223 kb
  • ePUB format
    1131 kb
  • DJVU format
    1397 kb
  • Rating:
    4.5
  • Votes:
    862
  • Formats:
    azw mobi lit mobi


When Henry Dunow signs up to coach his son Max’s Little League team on Manhattan’s Upper West Side, he finds himself looking back on his own childhood and his father, Moishe, a Yiddish writer and refugee from Hitler’s Europe, who had considered recreation like playing catch with his son narishkeit, foolishness.

The Way Home is the affecting and ironic story of Dunow’s journey of discovery as he watches his relationship with Max evolve over the course of a Little League season, and comes to understand what being a father to his son can teach him about the man who was his own father. Не удалось найти ни одного отзыва.

When Henry Dunow signs up to coach his son Max’s Little League team on Manhattan’s Upper West Side, he finds himself looking back on his own childhood and . com User, June 30, 2001. I couldn't put the book down and didn't want it to end.

When Henry Dunow signs up to coach his son Max’s Little League team on Manhattan’s Upper West Side, he finds himself looking back on his own childhood and hi. . Henry has a very conversational writing style that grabs your heart and involves you emotionally in his wonderful memoir. I laughed and cried my way through every page.

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Scenes from a Season, Lessons from a Lifetime

Scenes from a Season, Lessons from a Lifetime. Published May 15, 2001 by Broadway. Biography & Autobiography, Nonfiction. The Way Home is the affecting and ironic story of Dunow's journey of discovery as he watches his relationship with Max evolve over the course of a Little League season, and comes to understand what being a father to his son can teach him about the man who was his own father. The call came on a cold, snowy night in January.

When Henry Dunow signs up to coach his son Max’s Little League team on Manhattan’s Upper West Side, he finds himself looking back on his own childhood and his father, Moishe, a Yiddish writer and refugee from Hitler’s Europe, who had considered recreation like playing catch with his son narishkeit, foolishness.

Henry Dunow, The Way Home: Scenes from a Season, Lessons from a Lifetime, New York 2001, pp. 65–84, 188-193, 229-230; Beate Kosmala, Juden und Deutsche im polnischen Haus. Tomaszów Mazowiecki 1914-1939, Berlin 2001, pp. 47, 99-101 (in German)

Robert Lipsyte column discusses Henry Dunow's book The Way Home: Scenes from a Season, Lessons .

Robert Lipsyte column discusses Henry Dunow's book The Way Home: Scenes from a Season, Lessons from a Lifetime; profile of Dunow, who coaches his son's Little League team; photo (M. Henry Dunow, still small and bookish at 47, wondered last year if he was man enough to coach the West Side Little League team of his 7-year-old son, Max. What does ''man enough'' mean? And don't you qualify just by being a father? Dunow invites us to watch his answers slowly unfold in a poignant, revealing and useful essay on sports and fatherhood, ''The Way Home: Scenes From a Season, Lessons From a Lifetime,'' just published by Broadway Books.

Henry Dunay is at Rockefeller Center Christmas Tree. 23 December 2019 at 15:58 ·. Happy Holidays !

When Henry Dunow signs up to coach his son Max's Little League team on Manhattan's Upper West Side, he finds himself thinking of his own childhood and about his father, Moishe, and what had been missing from their relationship. Moishe, a Yiddish writer who had recently fled Hitler's Europe, was not a typical postwar dad. Though a tender and loving father, he considered recreation like playing catch with his son narishkeit, "foolishness." Such rites of an all-American boyhood as Little League and the world of sports were utterly foreign in Henry’s cloistered family.Determined to be a different kind of parent to his first grader, Dunow bumbles through a self-test of fatherhood on the scruffy fields of New York's Riverside Park, playing coach, cheerleader, father, and friend to a ragtag bunch of seven-year-olds, many of whom are discovering baseball for the first time. His Galaxies are a varied lot-from one dreamy little boy who never stops talking to himself in the outfield, and another who has recently suffered a tragic loss and is angry at the world, to one who needs to be pointed in the direction of first base every time he's lucky enough to hit the ball.The Way Homeis the affecting and ironic story of Dunow's journey of discovery as he watches his relationship with Max evolve over the course of a Little League season. With the warmth and humor of a natural storyteller, Dunow recounts the antics of the Galaxies and shares keen observations about parenthood, Jewishness, urban life, and the culture of competition among men and boys. Along the way, he explores the difficult separation from his father and the choices he made in life that Moishe did not understand. He finds that what most renews the feeling of connection with his father-even long after he is gone-is the experience of becoming a father himself.The Way Homeis a touching story of a man trying to understand what it means to be a father even as he is still coming to terms with what it meant to be a son. It will speak to anyone striving to savor what is most precious and fleeting in family life.

Spilberg
This is a heart-warming book with just enough edge to keep it interesting. You know the author is a nice, generous guy right from the beginning when he remembers to thank the women in his life even though the book is primarily about fathers and sons and finding an identity within generational roles. Dunow begins with the worry that he is not close enough to his son, which leads him to investigate conflicts he had with his father and finally to take a good look at himself. All of this remains a compelling sub story to the amusing main plot covering a single season of coaching his son’s Little League team. When Dunow describes his son’s imaginary play-by-play narratives, I thought of my own son, who seemed to enjoy acting out the spectacle of the game as much as the game itself. I also admire Dunow’s ability to give us a clear picture of distinct team members, bringing personality to a crew of seven-year-olds. The memoir is a skillful blend of current scenes and past experience.
Marige
I couldn't put the book down and didn't want it to end. Henry has a very conversational writing style that grabs your heart and involves you emotionally in his wonderful memoir. I laughed and cried my way through every page. It was an incredible journey and one I plan to experience each Father's Day. Henry has a gift and I'm glad he chose to share it with us. Read this book. You will be moved.
Llathidan
If you’re a Midwesterner like I am, you might be surprised to discover Manhattan has enough green space outside of Central Park for Little League games. And you might be surprised to discover a New York literary agent volunteering as a Little League coach. Neither stuffy nor starchy, author Henry Dunow is just a regular guy trying to find a way to connect with his 7-year-old son. After an early childhood scare of cerebral palsy, Max finds his footing as a first-time ever baseball player. Not the most rigorous of coaches, Dunow grows as a father—and father figure—to a dozen kids whose antics rival those of the Bad News Bears. Dunow’s lyrical writing style makes his season with the Galaxies as easy to follow as a bouncing ball. You don’t have to be a sports fanatic to enjoy the book. There’s some gushing about father-and-son’s hero Derek Jeter, still years away from retirement, and a couple of now dated cheers for pre-steroid-scandalized Mark McGwire. In fact, one of the ironies is how sports—a trivial pursuit in Dunow’s father’s view—can bring father and son together on much more than a superficial level. There are others, of course: video games, model rockets, Cub scouts, swim lessons. But sports is a major ties that binds.

Many male readers can sympathize with an author whose father was paradoxically interactive but distant. Moishe, a Yiddish writer who emigrated to the U.S. to flee the Nazi menace, although a loving, overprotective father, has rigid views about his son’s choice of career and girlfriends. How many dads, like Dunow, have wished to make a deeper connection with their own sons than they had with their fathers? It’s also easy to relate to the roundtable discussion of a bunch of middle-aged men who recall their early traumatic introduction to sports as a defining rite of passage that can assign you to an alpha or beta role for life. Psychoanalytical, existential, and nostalgic when recounting his turbulent relationship with his father, Dunow describes his relationship with Max in tender, affectionate, poignant terms. But it’s the humorous moments that keep the memoir on a light note, as his players converge six at a time on fly balls, or hold onto the ball in freeze-frame moments of indecision, or repeatedly ask directions to center field, or lie down in the outfield to examine insects, or practice Tai Chi while waiting for a ball to come their way, or, in the case of his son, reach out for a spectacular catch of a foul ball with his eyes closed. The end of the book begs for a sequel or companion piece: maybe a study of the father-daughter relationship based on Max’s twin sister Maddy.
Amhirishes
Like Dunow I decided to coach Little League to relate better to one of my son's and to make sure he got a fair shake at developing as a baseball player. Unlike Dunow I didn't get the job the first time I applied.
I found the Little League situations fascinating and related to the various players coaches, their attitudes and the situations. But it surprised me that Dunow's team improved so much without special coaching or instilling much competitiveness. I would be kind to the kids and almost never yell at them unless they weren't paying attention to the game while they were in the field. Dunow took a very gentle, kind and noncompetitive approach which worked surprisingly well. Even the problem kid Dylan came around in the end.

I was very interested in the Little League story and the fact that his son Max was a baseball trivia nut, knowing everything about the Yankees and his idol Derek Jeter. I was a lot that way as a child too. But Dunow alternates chapters, with one covering how he and his seven year old son progress during the Little League season followed by a chapter covering his own childhood and his relationship to his father.

I found the chapters about Little League more interesting. The switching back and forth breaks up the continuity and the two stories do not connect together very well. In the end he does do a good job of tieing his relationship with his son to his relationship to his father but the connection does not justify the style which I found disconcerting.

Both stories by themselves could make for interesting books but together it doesn't work. I found myself wanting to get through the chapters about his father to get back to the chapters about his son and the Little League. Hence I only gave it 3 stars.
spacebreeze
This is perhaps the richest, most moving and layered book I've read in years. Anyone who's shared a strong interest with their child--particularly if it is an interest that was either notably present or notably absent in your relationship with your parents--will find this book rich with wisdom and insight. Funny, moving, tender and wise, this book bridges genres as easily as it does generations, thanks to the author's deft and nimble writing. (And judging by the photos of him on the front cover and back flap, he's a hunk as well. Too bad he's married, apparently quite happily.)