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by Steven Squyres
Download Roving Mars: Spirit, Opportunity, and the Exploration of the Red Planet fb2
Professionals & Academics
  • Author:
    Steven Squyres
  • ISBN:
    1401308511
  • ISBN13:
    978-1401308513
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Hachette Books; Reprint edition (May 9, 2006)
  • Pages:
    432 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Professionals & Academics
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1510 kb
  • ePUB format
    1602 kb
  • DJVU format
    1894 kb
  • Rating:
    4.3
  • Votes:
    569
  • Formats:
    docx rtf mobi txt


ROVING MARS is their story as told by Steve Squyres

ROVING MARS is their story as told by Steve Squyres. Squyres, a geologist by profession, was the Principal Investigator, . science team leader, for the Spirit and Opportunity projects representing JPL. He recounts earlier years and unsuccessful attempts to get a lander proposal approved by NASA. By the end of the narrative in mid-September 2004, Spirit had reached 248 sols and Opportunity 227. Squyres expected the vehicles to die in months, perhaps a year at the outside, the buildup of dust on the rovers' energizing solar panels being the determining factor.

The Spirit and Opportunity rovers had projected operational lifespans of 90 sols . Despite its semi-technical nature, ROVING MARS was a book I couldn't put down, something I can't say about most of the trashy fiction novels I read.

The Spirit and Opportunity rovers had projected operational lifespans of 90 sols, each "sol" being a Martian day of 24 hours 39 minutes. Honor to Squyres and his scientific and engineering team is due.

Steve Squyres is the principal investigator (chief scientist-engineer) of the Mars Exploration Rover mission, which sent two rovers, Spirit and Opportunity, to look for evidence of water on Mars. There were two rovers because the two previous NASA missions to Mars (Mars Climate Orbiter and Mars Polar Lander) had failed, so it was logical to have redundancy in the next mission.

Steven Squyres talked about his book Roving Mars: Spirit, Opportunity, and the Exploration of the Red Planet, published by Hyperion at the Houston Museum of Natural Science. In 2005, two robotic rovers named Spirit and Opportunity touched down on the surface of Mars and began to exploration of the surface of the planet. As well as being the Goldwin Smith Professor of Astronomy at Cornell University Steve Squyres was the prinicipal scientist for the Mars Exploration Rover mission. The book chronicles the mission from what began as a dream for Squyres in 1977.

Squyres dreamed up the mission in 1987, saw it through from conception in 1995 to a successful landing in 2004, and .

He has gained a rare inside look at what it took for Rovers Spirit and Opportunity to land on the red planet in January 2004-and knows firsthand their findings. Steve Squyres is the scientist and principal investigator behind the Mars Exploration Rover mission, as well as a professor of astronomy at Cornell University. He has participated in a number of planetary spaceflight missions

Squyres, Steven W. Publication, Distribution, et. New York Includes index. Geographic Name: Mars (Planet) Exploration. United States New York New York

Squyres, Steven W. Personal Name: Updike, John, former owner, annotator. Hierarchical Place Name: United States New York New York. Download Roving Mars : spirit, opportunity, and the exploration of the red planet Steve Squyres. leave here couple of words about this book: Tags: Anorexia nervosa.

Steve Squyres is the face and voice of NASA's Mars Exploration Rover mission. He has gained a rare inside look at what it took for rovers Spirit and Opportunity to land on the red planet in January 2004-and knows firsthand their findings.

Book Format: Choose an option . The author is the principal investigator (the lead scientist) of the MER mission. Steve Squyres was the Principal Investigator for the Spirit and Opportunity missions and this is his memoir of how the idea came into being, how they were designed and built, launched and mission on Mars for the first 150 days. It's fairly lively as his excitement bleeds over but lets face it, the byzantine bureaucracy of NASA can be boring no matter how well written.

It's the age-old question: Is there life on Mars? Steve Squyres, lead scientist of NASA's Mars Exploration Rover mission, sets out to answer that question and relates his findings in this riveting first-person narrative account, now in paperback. Steve Squyres is the face and voice of NASA's Mars Exploration Rover mission. Squyres dreamed up the mission in 1987, saw it through from conception in 1995 to a successful landing in 2004, and serves as the principal scientist of its $400 million payload. He has gained a rare inside look at what it took for Rovers Spirit and Opportunity to land on the red planet in January 2004--and knows firsthand their findings.

lubov
Roving Mars
This is for the hardcover edition.

Now I see why they say rocket scientists are smart.

This great, fascinating, wonderful, captivating book is brimming with erudition. Not only can you learn about the manufacturing of the rovers, but it’ s also a great way to learn about Mars itself, close up. Topics like surface temperature, the presence of wind, the extent of the atmosphere, and the geology of Mars.

The book is divided into three parts: the planning, the making, and the actual liftoff plus landing. All three phases demonstrate great perseverance because there were many setbacks, and the project was constantly at the mercy of the hourglass. Time was everything…deadlines and more deadlines because launch windows for a Mars landing are brief, three weeks, and occur at intervals of twenty-six months. This is dictated by the orbital paths of the planets and can’t be changed. If they miss the chance, they have to wait another twenty-six months. The pressure is on.

Here are some interesting things in this book that I never knew about:
1)Though smaller in actual size than the Earth, there is more land on Mars than there is on Earth…because so much of the earth is covered with water. And they had to land near the Martian equator because the rovers are solar powered.
2)How are these spacecrafts paid for? Not everything is government funded. An A.O. (announcement of opportunity) is put out to any firm or manufacturer who would like to design equipment for the project. Infrared cameras, soil analyzers and so forth. And they who build it, pay for it.
2)There’s cork on the outside of the Delta launch rocket that holds the fuel. The adhesive that held the cork on the Rover rockets caused quite a problem. It started pealing off. But they resolved the issue. More pressure on the team.

3)A lot of red tape had to be disentangled to reach the red planet. The launch deadline was always lurking in the background; and everything had to be super exact in addition to being on time. The margin for error was very low throughout all phases of the project.

4)everything was strapped down tight with wire cables on lift off. Things like the folded solar panels, and when the rovers landed, blade-like projectiles were fired down metal tubes, like little rifle barrels, which cut the cables loose. Then the rovers unfolded like strange flowers on an alien world.

5)The rovers climb out of craters better in reverse gear than forward. The team didn’t learn this until they were on Mars.

Weight, weight, weight… it always came down to how much each component would contribute to the total payload. This put constant pressure on the designers, but, as is often the case with many endeavors, the team did great work. Some components had to be eliminated entirely, others had to be reconfigured and downsized to remain on board.

Engineering and science working together. Ex: engineering a Rover that can enter a crater and then safely climb back out. Science: construct equipment to use while in the crater, like rock and soil analyzers, that can determine if the geology formed in the presence of water.

There’s two sets of glossy color photos, clear and well labeled; you see the things that are described in the text, like the landing site, initial wheel tracks, testing rooms, Martian craters, mountains, launch sites and so on.
And once the Rovers landed safely, Geology was the key. The rovers went right to work, interrogating the stones with a fascinating array of analytical designs. The water on Mars might be gone, but certain types of stone known to have formed in the presence of water on earth were sought after and found. Also the sedimentary pattern of the stones within craters suggested there was indeed water at one time.

The mandatory requirements were far exceeded by the mission. NASA called for ninety days operational, plus 600 meters of travel( that’s 1968 feet in English, or six football fields - without end zones- and a fifty-six yard field goal in American English)…both rovers went above and beyond.

The prologue starts on page 1 and the actual print of the final chapter ends on page 378.Then follows a line drawing of the Mars rover with its various parts neatly labeled, such as cameras, solar arrays, low-gain antenna, rock abrasion tool and so on. then a glossary of terms and acronyms, followed by a giant list of names (small print) of every single person who worked on the project...there's a lot of names.The hardcover edition has raised lettering on the cover. It's a nice sturdy book.

Special Bonus: the metal plate holding the American flag decal was manufactured from a steel girder from the World Trade Center wreckage. Photo included; get the book just to see the picture. Also, the bureaucratic red tape that they had to go through to get that piece of metal was very extensive. It’s nice to know that this metal plate will be on Mars as long as there is a Mars. And the flag decal…will it too remain forever?
CONVERSE
"We see it! We see it! We see it! We're in lock. We're in lock." - Voice of Entry, Descent, Landing Telecom, Cruise Mission Support Area, Jet Propulsion Lab, January 4, 2004 on acquiring signals from Spirit lander after its touchdown on Mars.

On June 10 and July 7 of 2003, NASA and Pasadena's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) launched the twin Martian landers, Spirit and Opportunity respectively. They touched down on the Red Planet on January 4 and January 24 of 2004, the first mobile robotic explorers to do so since Pathfinder/Sojourner in 1997. ROVING MARS is their story as told by Steve Squyres.

Squyres, a geologist by profession, was the Principal Investigator, i.e. science team leader, for the Spirit and Opportunity projects representing JPL. He recounts earlier years and unsuccessful attempts to get a lander proposal approved by NASA. Then, against the backdrop of NASA's latest failures at Mars exploration, Mars Polar Lander and Mars Climate Orbiter in 1998, Steve shares the anxiety, frustration, doubts and hard work involved in getting eventual conceptual approval for the 2003 missions, followed by the months of design, construction, testing failures and successes, nearly insurmountable problems, budget overruns, and final nail-biting reviews by NASA before the rovers could be encapsulated in their landers and placed atop their Delta II rockets at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station for their launches, which themselves involved maddening delays. Following relatively uneventful flights to Mars, Squyres again picks up the rovers' stories to describe their landings, deployment, and treks of discovery. The goal of the dual mission - to discover in Martian rocks evidence for a watery past.

The reader will perhaps stand amazed that Spirit and Opportunity ever overcame multiple obstacles to get launched at all. There are two excellent sections of color photographs within the book, one of which images shows Squyres reaching for the sky in supreme exaltation as Spirit's deployment on Martian soil is confirmed by telemetry. Steve recalls that as one of the best moments of his life. And, when arriving at that point in the narrative recounting the tense moments of Spirit's landing, the (American) reader can perhaps be forgiven for letting out a yell of proud victory, "YES!" This was, after all, an American red, white and blue accomplishment told via the author's clear, informative and non-technical prose.

The Spirit and Opportunity rovers had projected operational lifespans of 90 sols, each "sol" being a Martian day of 24 hours 39 minutes. By the end of the narrative in mid-September 2004, Spirit had reached 248 sols and Opportunity 227. Squyres expected the vehicles to die in months, perhaps a year at the outside, the buildup of dust on the rovers' energizing solar panels being the determining factor.

If you go to JPL's website, you'll find that as of 2008 both Spirit and Opportunity, albeit somewhat worse for wear, are still operational on the Red Planet transmitting back pictures and data. Amidst all the planning and pre-mission speculation, nobody imagined that the rovers' solar panels would be cleaned by ... dust devils. You can't even get that service for your windshield at the gas station anymore.

Despite its semi-technical nature, ROVING MARS was a book I couldn't put down, something I can't say about most of the trashy fiction novels I read. Honor to Squyres and his scientific and engineering team is due. (More than 4,000 names are listed at the end of the book.) At 59 jaded years, it makes me particularly proud to be a citizen of the US of A.
Goltikree
This is a important work about the two rovers Spirit and Opportunity. Steve Squyres gives an honest assessment of what it took to get to Mars and even admits Gusev may have been an site of a large lake, but now it is a Endless Plain of Basalt. Both rovers demonstrated the dangers of sand and dust pits where the rovers would and could sink in to their doom. I enjoyed reading this book.