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by Florence Farmborough
Download With the Armies of the Tsar: A Nurse at the Russian Front, 1914-18 fb2
Professionals & Academics
  • Author:
    Florence Farmborough
  • ISBN:
    0812817931
  • ISBN13:
    978-0812817935
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Stein and Day (1975)
  • Pages:
    422 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Professionals & Academics
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1611 kb
  • ePUB format
    1436 kb
  • DJVU format
    1255 kb
  • Rating:
    4.7
  • Votes:
    688
  • Formats:
    lit mobi lrf mbr


In the summer of 1914, Florence Farmborough was an English governess working for the family of a Russian surgeon in Moscow. 1914-1918 An American nurse at the Russian front in WWI as well as the Revolution. Diary and photos by the author.

In the summer of 1914, Florence Farmborough was an English governess working for the family of a Russian surgeon in Moscow. With the outbreak of the war, she signed up as a Red Cross volunteer nurse - first in Moscow and then a few months later with a field hospital at the front. She spent the rest of the war (with a few short visits "home" to Moscow) at the front tending the sick and wounded.

Originally published under title Nurse at the Russian front. by. Farmborough, Florence. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Lotu Tii on March 1, 2012. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata). Terms of Service (last updated 12/31/2014).

Florence Farmborough, an English governess, spent WWI in Russia as a Red Cross nurse, and served at the front, taking photographs with a plate camera and keeping a diary in her spare time. After leaving Russia with great difficulty via Siberia, the only way out at that time, she became a Fellow of the Royal Geographical Society, writer, broadcaster, Times correspondent and university lecturer, later serving in WW2 with the WVS. Her photographs and diary were preserved by her sister Margaret until they were eventually published in 1974 when she was in her late 80's.

Florence Farmborough, who was the fourth of six children, . Nurse at the Russian Front: A Diary 1914-18 First published by Constable (UK) in 1974

Florence Farmborough, who was the fourth of six children, was born and grew up in Buckinghamshire. She originally went to live in Russia in 1908, and worked as a governess for a family in Kiev  . Nurse at the Russian Front: A Diary 1914-18 First published by Constable (UK) in 1974.

Florence Farmborough worked as a university lecturer in Spain, managing to be in the thick of the .

Florence Farmborough worked as a university lecturer in Spain, managing to be in the thick of the Spanish Civil War. She died in 1980. It is not only a remarkable personal story but also a striking historical document. Times Literary Supplement). The photgraphs inspired my imagination. Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn).

Farmborough, Florence. Uniform Title: Nurse at the Russian Front. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners. Download book With the armies of the Tsar : a nurse at the Russian Front in war and revolution, 1914-1918, Florence Farmborough.

With the armies of the tsar. Florence Farmborough. Originally published under title: Nurse at the Russian front: a diary 1914-18. With the armies of the tsar. 1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read. Are you sure you want to remove With the armies of the tsar from your list? With the armies of the tsar. a nurse at the Russian front, 1914-18. by Florence Farmborough.

Farmborough, Florence author. Nurse at the Russian front. Publication Information. Originally published under title Nurse at the Russian front. World War, 1914-1918 - Personal narratives, English. World War, 1914-1918 - War work - Red Cross

Farmborough, Florence author. New York : Stein and Day, Originally published under title Nurse at the Russian front. World War, 1914-1918 - War work - Red Cross. World War, 1914-1918 - Russia. Farmborough, Florence author. World War, 1914-1918 Personal narratives, English. World War, 1914-1918 War work Red Cross. World War, 1914-1918 Russia.

Farmborough, Florence. -NURSE AT THE RUSSIAN FRONT: A DIARY 1914-18. Additional Product Features. Place of Publication.

Living in Russia on the outbreak of the Great War in 1914, Florence Farmborough qualified and worked as a Red Cross nurse with the Imperial Russian army, and saw service at both the Galician and the Romanian Fronts

Living in Russia on the outbreak of the Great War in 1914, Florence Farmborough qualified and worked as a Red Cross nurse with the Imperial Russian army, and saw service at both the Galician and the Romanian Fronts. During her time as a nurse she kept a diary and habitually took a large plate camera around with her. She would develop and print her plates while encamped with the forces. Extracts from the diaries were eventually used as the source material for this book.

Book by Farmborough, Florence

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Florence Farmborough, an English governess, spent WWI in Russia as a Red Cross nurse, and served at the front, taking photographs with a plate camera and keeping a diary in her spare time. After leaving Russia with great difficulty via Siberia, the only way out at that time, she became a Fellow of the Royal Geographical Society, writer, broadcaster, Times correspondent and university lecturer, later serving in WW2 with the WVS. Her photographs and diary were preserved by her sister Margaret until they were eventually published in 1974 when she was in her late 80's. The manuscript was written by the author without the help of a ghost writer, and is outstanding not only for the fly-on-the-wall account of daily life in the most turbulent period of Russia's history by someone who lived it, but for its beautifully written page-turning readability.

I am always interested in the minute details of everyday life during historical events. We are all familiar with the overview: the big events, the conditions leading up to wars and invasions, the battles, what the rulers, the soldiers, armies did, but only rarely do we get an account of everyday life and the events as seen by an ordinary person. Ms. Farmborough gives us that account - a Samuel Pepys diary of WWI in Russia. The suffering, the petty restrictions, the privations, food rationing, lack of fuel, money becoming worthless overnight, the daily existence of people unaware of what was coming next as their world was turned upside down.

After the revolution, which comes at the end of the book and the account is far too short in my opinion, the bourgeois world was turned upside down and the educated, intelligentsia and middle class were penalized along with the upper class and made to do menial work - sweeping streets, cleaning toilets, laundry and acting as servants for their former servants. The jails and concentration camps were emptied of prisoners and armed thugs roamed the country stealing and ransacking property, acting as judge and jury executing anyone they thought fit and anyone who tried to prevent them. The population lived in daily fear of being charged and summarily executed as 'counter revolutionaries' for protesting against conditions, for having served in the Tsar's army, being educated, or because their home was being requisitioned. The country was being gutted of the very people it needed to function.

While the various revolutionary factions were struggling for power among themselves, petty directives were issued by the day by illiterate peasants elevated to Red Guards, and which appear to have been thought up by mad men in drunken contests. One example given was an order that all single women over 18 were to register with a bureau and would be matched with single men whom they would marry. Their children would become the property of the state and would be raised in children's camps. I don't know if this predecessor of the Nazi Lebensborn program was every carried out.

Ms. Farmborough wrote over 400,000 words, which the publisher cut to half and a more detailed account of events after the revolution may have ended on the cutting room floor; nevertheless, what remains is a beautifully written immensely readable 400 pages which made me want to know what happened next. Anyone interested in WWI should have this book in their collection. I read it when it was first published and never forgot it. It has taken me 35 years to find it again as the American title was different. The puzzle is why this has never been filmed?
Enalonasa
Excellent book on Russian history by an English nurse stuck in Russia.
Jonide
Florence Farmborough was a gutsy and intelligent English girl teaching a couple of aristocratic Russian gals how to speak English when WWI broke out. She loved Russia and, as England was a Russian ally, she applied herself to learning nurses' training and subsequently assisting doctors in attempting to save the lives of soldiers (from both sides) on the very front of the war action where under-trained Russians endlessly battled against their better-equipped Austrian and German counterparts.

The book, with its appurtenant excellent photos and maps, spun out of Farmborough's daily diary during her period all over the war front. She also spent furloughs in Moscow and in Kiev during the period, from whence she yields excellent information in regard to the ever-changing Russian political situation and the tenoned consequences of those events.

The writing is excellent and precise, documenting both the progress of the war and the incredible level of misery and slaughter that transpired. This is not a "peephole" at the war -- Farmborough gives us the full perspective and I have to say, I've never read a more revealing account of WWI. Perhaps more importantly, she presents an accurate and comprehensible narrative of how the Russian Revolution by the Bolsheviks (Lenin) came about and she absolutely nails the "whys" of how the situation leapt, over a short period and in several steps, from a Tsarist dictatorship, to a short-lived democracy, to the ultimate brutal Bolshevik (Communist) regieme.

In the final chapter, Farmborough tells of her "escape" by rail, over thousands of excrutiating miles of Siberian tundra, along with her fellow countrymen and other refugees, from the iron grasp of the brutal Red Communist minions. She ends her tale at the port city of Vladivostok, at the far eastern edge of Russia.

Rarely have I read an historical account of any event or incident which was so revealing as is this fine work. If you have the slightest interest in either Russian history and culture, or in World War One, do not bypass this incredible piece of historical documentation. This fine work reads as smoothly as a popular novel.