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by Michael J. Collins
Download Hot Lights, Cold Steel: Life, Death and Sleepless Nights in a Surgeon's First Years fb2
Professionals & Academics
  • Author:
    Michael J. Collins
  • ISBN:
    0312337787
  • ISBN13:
    978-0312337780
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    St. Martin's Press; 1st edition (February 1, 2005)
  • Pages:
    320 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Professionals & Academics
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1650 kb
  • ePUB format
    1598 kb
  • DJVU format
    1128 kb
  • Rating:
    4.8
  • Votes:
    789
  • Formats:
    lrf rtf doc lrf


Hot Lights, Cold Steel is at once darkly humorous and truly compassionate. This is a well-written and highly polished memoir about an Orthopaedic surgeon's four year residency at the famous Mayo Clinic in Minnesota.

Hot Lights, Cold Steel is at once darkly humorous and truly compassionate. Not since House of God has there been such a ferociously funny look at the world of hospital medicine. Michael Palmer, New York Times bestselling author of Fatal and The Society.

Hot Lights, Cold Steel book. This is a fetching recount of the life of an orthopedic surgeon. Mangled legs, bone cancer and death are daily realities.

Collins, Michael . . Surgeons, Medical - Physicians, Collins, Michael ., Biography, Autobiography, Medical, United States, Orthopedists, Medical, Surgery, General, Administration, Biography, ., Collins, Michael ., Orthopedics, Orthopedic Procedures, Surgical Procedures, Operative. New York : St. Martin's Press. ENCRYPTED DAISY download. For print-disabled users.

Электронная книга "Hot Lights, Cold Steel: Life, Death and Sleepless Nights in a Surgeon's First Years", Dr. Michael J. Collins. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Hot Lights, Cold Steel: Life, Death and Sleepless Nights in a Surgeon's First Years" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

When Michael Collins decides to become a surgeon, he is totally unprepared for the chaotic life of a resident at a major hospital.

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. When Michael Collins decides to become a surgeon, he is totally unprepared for the chaotic life of a resident at a major hospital. A natural overachiever, Collins' success, in college and medical school led to a surgical residency at one of the most respected medical centers in the world, the famed Mayo Clinic. But compared to his fellow residents Collins feels inadequate and unprepared.

Steel : Life, Death and Sleepless Nights in a Surgeon's First Years Hot Lights & Cold Steel. Published by Thriftbooks

Hot Lights, Cold Steel : Life, Death and Sleepless Nights in a Surgeon's First Years. by Michael J. The undeserved death of innocence is hard to take, and it affected the attending staff in a big way. This was also terribly difficult to read. Hot Lights & Cold Steel. Published by Thriftbooks. com User, 14 years ago. A very heart-rendering, gut-wrenching book that causes you to get misty-eyed one minute and laugh out loud the next. It follows a new physician through his four year residency program. All this with no sleep.

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When Michael Collins decides to become a surgeon, he is totally unprepared for the chaotic life of a resident at.Collins' good nature helps him over some of the rough spots but cannot spare him the harsh reality of a doctor's life. Every day he is confronted with decisions that will change people's lives-or end them-forever. A young boy's leg is mangled by a tractor: risk the boy's life to save his leg, or amputate immediately?

Hot Lights, Cold Steel is at once darkly humorous and truly compassionate

Hot Lights, Cold Steel is at once darkly humorous and truly compassionate. Not since The House of God has there been such a ferociously funny look at the world of hospital medicine. Michael Palmer, New York Times. bestselling author of Fatal and The Patient. On a sweltering Friday afternoon, the day before we were to officially begin our residency, we gathered in a small classroom on the fourteenth floor of the Mayo Building for our orientation meeting. Crammed into this room were fifteen incredibly bright first-year orthopedic surgery residents-and me, a ex-cabdriver and ex-construction worker long on dreams but short on credentials.

Only 6 left! Book Format: Paperback Unflinching and deeply engaging, Hot Lights, Cold Steel is a humane and passionate reminder that doctors are people too. This is a gripping memoir, at times devastating, others.

Only 6 left! Book Format: Paperback. Unflinching and deeply engaging, Hot Lights, Cold Steel is a humane and passionate reminder that doctors are people too. This is a gripping memoir, at times devastating, others triumphant, but always compulsively readable.

When Michael Collins decides to become a surgeon, he is totally unprepared for the chaotic life of a resident at a major hospital. A natural overachiever, Collins' success, in college and medical school led to a surgical residency at one of the most respected medical centers in the world, the famed Mayo Clinic. But compared to his fellow residents Collins feels inadequate and unprepared. All too soon, the euphoria of beginning his career as an orthopedic resident gives way to the feeling he is a counterfeit, an imposter who has infiltrated a society of brilliant surgeons. This story of Collins' four-year surgical residency traces his rise from an eager but clueless first-year resident to accomplished Chief Resident in his final year. With unparalleled humor, he recounts the disparity between people's perceptions of a doctor's glamorous life and the real thing: a succession of run down cars that are towed to the junk yard, long weekends moonlighting at rural hospitals, a family that grows larger every year, and a laughable income. Collins' good nature helps him over some of the rough spots but cannot spare him the harsh reality of a doctor's life. Every day he is confronted with decisions that will change people's lives-or end them-forever. A young boy's leg is mangled by a tractor: risk the boy's life to save his leg, or amputate immediately? A woman diagnosed with bone cancer injures her hip: go through a painful hip operation even though she has only months to live? Like a jolt to the system, he is faced with the reality of suffering and death as he struggles to reconcile his idealism and aspiration to heal with the recognition of his own limitations and imperfections. Unflinching and deeply engaging, Hot Lights, Cold Steel is a humane and passionate reminder that doctors are people too. This is a gripping memoir, at times devastating, others triumphant, but always compulsively readable.

Manris
My wife will be starting her residency in July of 2016 (gen surg) and as a diligent husband, try to become more knowledgeable with what she has in her future (the medical field fascinates me as well). I was very impressed with how the book was written and the stories it told. I believe that there are many points in the book that are applicable to anyone, not just students looking at ortho or even medical students as a whole. I appreciated how he tied his family and friends into the story, as well as the physicians and caretakers at the hospital.

Helping my wife study through the past few years did help me in reading this. There were terms here and there that I would have had to look up if it were not for that (Anencephaly stumped me, now I know).
Drelajurus
This is a well-written and highly polished memoir about an Orthopaedic surgeon's four year residency at the famous Mayo Clinic in Minnesota. Dr. Collins is a good writer, giving the impression that he poured his heart and soul into this text: it's funny, at times sad and gruesome in parts, but again, reading about the training surgeon, one gets the distinct feeling that these men and women, having to run through the depths of hell to finally get qualified, must be born to the task - or simply masochistic by nature.

If this memoir is to be believed, and there's no reason why it shouldn't, every nightmare story that you have heard about the four-year residency is absolutely true. It's astounding that these people manage to survive - the tortuous long stretches on their feet saving lives, sometimes reaching 60 to 70 hours is nothing less than miraculous. Treating patients day and night, constantly worrying that you'll screw up, taking peoples lives in your hands could send the most grounded individual around the bend - in some cases it does, but for the most part, these people get through to become qualified surgeons, as did Dr. Collins, but through a lot of blood sweat and tears.

Hot Lights, Cold Steel reads like a novel, as the characterization, structure of the plot and the pathos, the utter sadness of some of his cases, and the joy and exhilaration of his successes, had me just as enthralled as any top selling thriller. Dr. Collins has a gift for description as he illustrates the amputation of a limb, including a section of the patient's pelvis, in such detailed imagery, that it became difficult to read. He also has a great sense of humour, which I believe is so necessary to survive in this profession.

One of the more terrible of the Dr.'s experiences was the attempted resuscitation of a six year old boy who had been run over by a drunk. Collins and the ER staff did everything humanly possible to save the child, but his injuries were too severe. The undeserved death of innocence is hard to take, and it affected the attending staff in a big way. This was also terribly difficult to read. Then there was the young kindergarten teacher who just came in because of a slight pain in her hip, to discover her entire skeleton was riddled with cancer, unfortunately she died six months later. After reading about these cases one realizes that life is fleeting and fragile, and should never be taken for granted.

I have always had great respect for those in the medical profession, but this book has doubled that respect and opened my eyes to their tenacity, courage and skill. This is a great book and is highly recommended.
The Sinners from Mitar
Skip the Kindle version and buy the paperback or hardback. The Kindle version is riddled with typos and (presumably) digital conversion errors. If I were the author, I would be appalled that my publisher deemed this acceptable. When I complained to Amazon, they suggested I send them a detailed list of all the errors. I bought the book for $9.99 and they would like me to do the proofreading as well? Although this is the worst book I have come across in terms of errors (I would never buy another digital book published by St. Martin's Press), other Kindle books are similarly poorly edited and much of my initial enthusiasm for this medium has been dampened by the poor quality.
fightnight
First things first, I cannot describe how great this book is. I really want to let a waterfall of compliments and praise fall out of my mouth, but I have no real words. This is one of the first books I bought after reading Roadside Picnic and I have to say that it is a drastic change in subject matter but had me hook on every character, event, or inner monologue from Collins. I have to say that this story is one that I would adore if it became a movie or short TV series, but even then the way the story is presented is one that can't be matched by visual media. So just to wrap up, this is a damn fine book. Damn fine.
Gavinrage
Michael Collins is a born story-teller.

It doesn't matter if you aren't interested in medicine or if you don't intend on becoming a surgeon. Collins is not here for that. He does not fill his book with medical jargon or complex diagrams. He doesn't go into long descriptions as to how the body works. Collins does not focus on the minutia of his career, but rather, how it has impacted him and his life.

It is not simply a tale of a surgeon going through his residency. It's a memoir of a man's coming of age and his indomitable will. It's a testament towards human suffering, human imperfection, and Collins' journey that despite all of this, he must endure and prevail.

Collins' good natured humor does not mesh well with the rigors and sadness of his everyday losses. He tip-toes the wire of life and death with a crack whip wit and a challenged sense of compassion. The reader will laugh at the everyday absurdity of his life, feel uplifted by his victories and growing skill as a surgeon, and will feel their heart utterly break as Collins mourns the death of his patients. His pain is real, and it bleeds through the prose.

It is clear that Collins poured his soul and mind into writing this book, and it shows. This is not a tale of someone hoping to shine the light on the medical profession, or show what being a surgeon is like. Collins is past that. Instead, he writes a book that details his journey from a wide-eyed medical student into a hardened chief resident, and the effect it has had on his psyche.

You will laugh, you will cry, but ultimately, this book is unforgettable. It is touching, uplifting, and heart-breaking, and I will never forget reading it.