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by Sherwin B. Nuland
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Professionals & Academics
  • Author:
    Sherwin B. Nuland
  • ISBN:
    0394551303
  • ISBN13:
    978-0394551302
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Knopf; 1st edition (May 12, 1988)
  • Pages:
    519 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Professionals & Academics
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1265 kb
  • ePUB format
    1119 kb
  • DJVU format
    1205 kb
  • Rating:
    4.3
  • Votes:
    230
  • Formats:
    txt doc docx mbr


Through the centuries, the men and women who have shaped the world of medicine have been not only very human, but also very much the products of their own times and places.

But as renowned Yale surgeon and medical historian Sherwin B. Nuland shows in this brilliant collection of. .An historical outline develops as Nuland (Yale School of Medicine) examines the biographies of significant doctors engaged in the art and science of medicine.

Through the centuries, the men and women who have shaped the world of medicine have been not only very human, but also very much the products of their own times and places. He considers philosophical and ethical.

Sherwin Bernard Nuland (born Shepsel Ber Nudelman; December 8, 1930 – March 3, 2014) was an American surgeon and writer who taught bioethics, history of medicine, and medicine at the Yale School of Medicine, and occasionally bioethics and history of medicine.

Sherwin Bernard Nuland (born Shepsel Ber Nudelman; December 8, 1930 – March 3, 2014) was an American surgeon and writer who taught bioethics, history of medicine, and medicine at the Yale School of Medicine, and occasionally bioethics and history of medicine at Yale College. His 1994 book How We Die: Reflections on Life's Final Chapter was a New York Times Best Seller and won the National Book Award for Nonfiction, as well as being a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize.

Электронная книга "Doctors: The Biography of Medicine", Sherwin B. Nuland

Электронная книга "Doctors: The Biography of Medicine", Sherwin B. Nuland. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Doctors: The Biography of Medicine" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Since 1994, the Institute of Medicine's Food and Nutrition Board has been involved in developing.

Preventing childhood obesity : health in the balance. 48 MB·8,318 Downloads·New!. Dietary Reference Intakes. 306 Pages·2001·886 KB·21,601 Downloads·New! Since 1994, the Institute of Medicine's Food and Nutrition Board has been involved in developing. 53 MB·55,384 Downloads·New! STEELS provides a metallurgical understanding of commercial steel grades and the design.

Nuland, Sherwin B. Publication date. Physicians, Medicine, History of Medicine, Physicians, Geneeskunde. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Delaware County District Library (Ohio). Uploaded by Sanderia on September 28, 2010.

US surgeon Sherwin Nuland (1930-2014) taught bioethics, the history of medicine, and medicine at Yale University. And that was my first book. It was called 'Doctors: The Biography of Medicine'. He was the author of ‘How We Die’, which made ‘The New York Times’ bestseller list and won the National Book Award. It was a medical history based on the lives of some of the leading people. And I thought, you know, it's a Knopf publication, but it's not going to sell a lot of copies. He gave me a very small advance.

In this book Nuland takes the reader on an odyssey of western medical history spanning antiquity to modern medicine. It takes brief snapshots of a few of the physicians who have molded medicine into what it is today. He vividly brings to life colorful people like Vesalius who refused to accept the status quo of his time, but instead rejected popular theories because they did not agree with experimental results.

Sherwin B. Nuland is Clinical Professor of Surgery at Yale University School of Medicine and a Fellow at Yale's Institute for Social and Policy Studies. He is the author of over ten books, including the National Book Award-winning, HOW WE DIE: Reflections on Life's Final Chapter, an inquiry into the causes and modes of death that spent 34 weeks on the New York Times best-seller list. Customers Also Bought Items By.

Similar books and articles. Sherwin B. Nuland - 1993 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 37 (2):159-172. Making Medical Doctors: Science and Medicine at Vanderbilt Since Flexner by Timothy C. Jacobson. A Surgeon's Valedictory. Joel Howell - 1989 - Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 80:93-94. Trusting Doctors: The Decline of Moral Authority in American Medicine. Jonathan B. Imber - 2008 - Princeton University Press. Conscientious Refusal and a Doctors's Right to Quit. John K. Davis - 2004 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 29 (1):75 – 91. The Practice of Defensive Medicine Among Hospital Doctors in the United Kingdom.

How does medical science advance? Popular historians would have us believe that a few heroic individuals, possessing superhuman talents, lead an unselfish quest to better the human condition. But as renowned Yale surgeon and medical historian Sherwin B. Nuland shows in this brilliant collection of linked life portraits, the theory bears little resemblance to the truth.Through the centuries, the men and women Who have shaped the world of medicine have been not only very human people but also very much the products of their own times and places. Presenting compelling studies of great medical innovators and pioneers, Doctors gives us the extraordinary story of the development of modern medicine -- told through the lives of the physician-scientists whose deeds and determination paved the way. Ranging from the legendary Father of Medicine, Hippocrates, to Andreas Vesalius, whose Renaissance masterwork on anatomy offered invaluable new insight into the human body, to Helen Taussig, founder of pediatric cardiology and co-inventor of the original "blue baby" operation, here is a volume filled with the spirit of ideas and the thrill of discovery. Says The New York Times, "Doctors can be warmly recommended. Dr. Nuland succeeds in bringing his subjects vividly to life, and he leaves you with a much better understanding of what they achieved."From the Trade Paperback edition.

Nakora
Really enjoyed the book. It goes through much of the history of medicine with each chapter focusing on a famous physician-scientist who profoundly changed medicine as we practice it today. A few of the chapters cover more than one person such as the 'discovery' / first implementation of anesthesia in surgery. I will say that Dr Nuland is a surgeon and there is a little bit of a bias towards surgical advances in medicine but others are still represented. But, for example, it's Halsted that has a chapter in the book and not Osler. I'm going into surgery so this was a plus for me--and you will still learn a lot of other stuff about medicine from this book--but you may not like that if you're looking for more internal medicine type things. My only real complaint is that the book may go into too much detail. Dr Nuland does a phenomenal job of detailing many of these individuals personal lives. Personally I would have preferred slightly shorter chapters but more of them teaching me about other great discoveries and discoverers that I wasn't familiar with. However what you get is good. Well researched, well written, and you absolutely don't have to have any real medical knowledge to appreciate this book and understand it. I would certainly recommend.
asAS
I teach the history of medicine and anatomy at a U.S. medical school and I spend a lot of time reviewing the available books so that I can sharpen up my lectures. I'm not going to claim that medical history is the most electrifying topic for first-year medical students, but when it is presented properly it can be very engaging. This is exactly what Dr. Nuland has done with this book.

Doctors is a well-organized and readable text and Dr. Nuland has done a great deal of research but more importantly, he has obviously practiced how to deliver the stories in a way that is suspenseful and satisfying. He starts chronologically and moves from Hippocrates, through Andreas Vesalius, William Harvey, Rudolph Virchow, Helen Taussig, describing the individuals responsible for the good, the bad, and the ugly sides of the history of medical practice as we see it today.

His narrative relates strictly to the history of Western medicine and the influences that have shaped it. He does not go into any details regarding Eastern medicine or other medical practices since this is not directly related to the main theme of the book. The only topic I wish he had spent more time covering was the Islamic physicians of the middle ages. Western medicine (along with all the sciences) were maintained at a high level in the Muslim societies of the middle ages before passing into the newly-founded European Universities.

By following the history of medicine through the persons (and extreme personalities) that influenced it, Dr. Nuland is able to educate and entertain. I have listened repeatedly to the lectures that he has produced with the Teaching Company and it is nice to know that he writes as well as he speaks. I have reviewed other books on the topic but so far this is my undisputed favorite.
Madis
WARNING - This was published in 1988. The newer version (2008) is illustrated and is easier to read
Rivik
Nuland does a fine job of linking the crucial developments in medical history through a close examination of the doctors who made them possible. Unlike "How We Die," this book doesn't delve so much into the technical aspects of the medical discoveries as it does paint a rich picture of the intellectual and moral environment from which they emerged. The focus is on the men and women who were the true innovators and independent thinkers of their time.

Occasionally, Nuland's enthusiasm for his topic leads him on some unnecessary tangents in covering some of the less interesting details of his subjects, but he invariably gets back on track in time to connect the reader to the next medical advancement. My only disappointment is that I wish he spent more time explaining in depth the technical aspects of the discoveries, which he is brilliant at in translating for the layman, and less time investigating the trivial quirks of his subjects. However, in his defense, the subtitle does make it clear that it is a "biography," and an overall good one at that.
Yellow Judge
I’m sure the author thinks his writing style is elegant, but tortuous and showy are better descriptors. I mean, who uses “amanuensis” instead of “secretary”? That is only one example.
monotronik
This is a very well written book especially if the sciences, history or medicine is not your strong suite. Mr. Nuland took a potentially boring subject (what history subject isn't?) and has made it very interesting to read.
I like math, but in school and college, I never did well with subjects that related to history and especially with science. I don't even read that much. However, I could not put this book down. I liked it so much, I have read it 3 times. It is a very enriching book. Thanks Mr. Nuland for restoring my confidence in being able to comprehend subjects that deal with medicine and history! My wish list is for Mr. Nuland to put this out on audio cassette.
Thomas Jue
Qane
Must read book for those who enjoy the history of medicine. Nuland manages to tell fascinating stories of great medical advances in readable brief stories.
This book chronicals several discoveries by doctors throughout the last two thousand years that changed the course and direction of medicine. The author is a doctor obviously very interested in the history of medicine. His writing style is not a succinct description of the doctor and discovery in question; instead he makes the events into an illustration of his theory about how and why it changed medical history. I think some people would find his style dull, but as one reads, his choice of doctors and discoveries builds a clearer and clearer understanding of how medicine has reached the level of excellence that it has. That story is gripping by itself if you're fascinated by history. In the end the reader gains a real appreciation for the tortuous twists and turns that medicine has gone through. How lucky we are to live at this time!