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by Frank Shorter
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  • Author:
    Frank Shorter
  • ISBN:
    039535403X
  • ISBN13:
    978-0395354032
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Houghton Mifflin Harcourt; First Edition edition (May 1, 1984)
  • Pages:
    258 pages
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1581 kb
  • ePUB format
    1435 kb
  • DJVU format
    1267 kb
  • Rating:
    4.9
  • Votes:
    739
  • Formats:
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Frank Shorter's 1984 "Olympic Gold" is perhaps too understated for its own good.

Frank Shorter's 1984 "Olympic Gold" is perhaps too understated for its own good. To the average reader, this may seem like a fairly standard athlete autobiography. A gold medalist in the 1972 Munich Olympic marathon, Shorter was cheated of a repeat victory in 1976 when it was revealed years later that the East German winner was on a state-regulated steroids regime. It was a time long before the running boom and Shorter - along with Steve Prefontaine and a handful of others - was a catalyst to bring the sport to the streets and trails of this country.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Olympic Gold: A Runner's Life And Times as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. For those who remember the times, Frank Shorter's dramatic and surprising marathon victory at the 1972 Munich Olympic Games helped ignite mass interest in the United States in long distance running as a competitive event and as a vehicle for personal fitness

Items related to Olympic Gold: A Runner's Life and Times. In addition to our internet business, we operate a retail store specializing in rare books, original movie posters, celebrity autographs and other unique entertainment memorabilia.

Items related to Olympic Gold: A Runner's Life and Times. Home Shorter, Frank with Bloom, Marc Olympic Gold: A Runner's Life and Times. Olympic Gold: A Runner's Life and Times. Shorter, Frank with Bloom, Marc. Published by Houghton, Mifflin Boston, 1984. Visit Seller's Storefront. Terms of Sale: PAYMENT: We accept MasterCard, VISA, American Express, Discover and Paypal.

Collection of sourced quotations from Olympic Gold: A Runner's Life and Times (1984) by Frank Shorter. Quote of the day. She always says, my lord, that facts are like cows. If you look them in the face hard enough they generally run away. She is a very courageous woman, my lord.

Frank Shorter, Marc Bloom (1984). Olympic gold: a runner's life and times, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. Born: October 31, 1947. Profession: Olympic athlete. Mind, Training, Body. 27. Running a marathon is just like reading a good book.

Discover Frank Shorter famous and rare quotes. Frank Shorter, Marc Bloom (1984). I admire runners older than I - they are now my heroes. I want to be like them as I grow older. After a while you're just not conscious of the physical act of reading.

Frank Charles Shorter (born October 31, 1947) is an American former long-distance runner who won the gold medal in the marathon at the 1972 Summer Olympics and the silver medal at the 1976 Summer Olympics.

He spins a captivating narrative about winning the ’72 Olympic Marathon, leading the fight against illegal doping, and being the last person to see his friend Steve Prefontaine alive. He had long been known, even by his peers, as a bit of a loner and as someone willing to stand apart from the pack.

Flag as Inappropriate Shorter won the . national cross-country championships four times (1970, 1971, 1972, 1973).

Flag as Inappropriate. Shorter first achieved distinction by winning the 1969 National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) 10,000-meter title during his senior year at Yale.

The 1972 Olympic marathon gold medalist, whose triumph launched the running boom in the United States, reviews the role of running in his life, his techniques and training methods, and the performance of other leading runners

Rit
Frank Shorter's 1984 "Olympic Gold" is perhaps too understated for its own good. To the average reader, this may seem like a fairly standard athlete autobiography. For those who remember the times, Frank Shorter's dramatic and surprising marathon victory at the 1972 Munich Olympic Games helped ignite mass interest in the United States in long distance running as a competitive event and as a vehicle for personal fitness. Shorter didn't create the running boom of the 1970's, but he surely helped lead the way.

"Olympic Gold" chronicles Shorter's rise from above-average prep school runner to promising collegiate runner to world class athlete. U.S. athletes had been virtual no-shows in long distance running for decades; Shorter was one of a group of young runners who invested the time and milage to become internationally ranked in the 1970's. Shorter himself, along with Steve Prefontaine, was one of a rare breed who were truly competitive at distances from two miles to the marathon.

Shorter went beyond the racing to push the envelope on obsolete restrictions on amateurism in the United States. Thanks in significant degree to his pioneering advocacy, U.S. runners can now be paid for their appearences at races and can earn money through endorsements. Shorter himself helped pay for his training by marketing a line of clothing specifically adapted to running.

Shorter and his contemporaries are all long since retired from competitive running, but his biography makes for an interest time capsule, full of insights on the making of the running boom of the 1970's. This book is highly recommended to those who lived that era, or may be curious about it.
hulk
Frank Shorter is perhaps the greatest American distance runner ever and he fought hard with a group of athletes to break the monopoly the archaic AAU had on governing track & field. A gold medalist in the 1972 Munich Olympic marathon, Shorter was cheated of a repeat victory in 1976 when it was revealed years later that the East German winner was on a state-regulated steroids regime.

It was a time long before the running boom and Shorter - along with Steve Prefontaine and a handful of others - was a catalyst to bring the sport to the streets and trails of this country. At one point, Shorter's father had to drive "shotgun" while he trained due to being frequently harassed by a group of punks.

Shorter was also one of the first American track athletes to start his own clothing line, and the book traces the hurdles he had in getting the project off the ground. While in a dispute with the manufacturer, the clothing line that was stored in a warehouse was stripped of the company logo and repackaged for sale under another runner's brand name!

His dispute with Bill Rodgers is also candidly dealt with, though both have patched up their differences since the book was published in the early 1980s.

Runners who came of age after Shorter retired from international competition will appreciate the history lesson. Those who laced up the shoes before or during the early stages of the running boom will enjoy a trek down memory lane.
Manona
Pretty good detail on Frank Shorter's rise from a pretty fair HS distance runner to a versatile athlete that could run national and world class 5Ks, 10Ks and marathons. He and Prefontaine kicked off the running boom. Shorter was part of the great USA running elite and central character in the outstanding Florida Track Club. Also, detail in his fight to establish more control of the American track athlete's rights to compete from the then AAU and the now TAC. Although I enjoyed the book I found it a bit choppy. It reminded me of a telling told in a series of interviews that sometimes overlap in detail. I think a greater collaberation would have been more effective if Kenny Moore (Sports Illustrated writer and 4th place USA finisher to Shorter's gold) wrote it with Shorter.