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by Jan Dalley
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  • Author:
    Jan Dalley
  • ISBN:
    0571144489
  • ISBN13:
    978-0571144488
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Faber And Faber; First Edition edition (1999)
  • Pages:
    512 pages
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1149 kb
  • ePUB format
    1510 kb
  • DJVU format
    1645 kb
  • Rating:
    4.8
  • Votes:
    992
  • Formats:
    lrf rtf azw lrf


Growing enthusiasm for the Nazis spurred frequent visits to Germany and meetings with Hitler and other leaders (the Mosleys were actually married in Goebbels's house in 1936); there were struggles to raise money for Mosley's organization and, finally, after war was declared, years of internment in Holloway prison.

Mosley, Diana, Lady, 1910-, Fascism - Great Britain - History - 20th century, Nobility - Great Britain - Biography, Great Britain - Social life and customs - 20th century, Great Britain - Biography. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china. Kahle/Austin Foundation.

Diana Mosley, wife of Sir Oswald Mosley, is reported on the 'best authority', that of her family and intimate circle, to be a public danger at the present time. Diana Mosley: a life. London: Faber & Faber. Is said to be far cleverer and more dangerous than her husband and will stick at nothing to achieve her ambitions. She is wildly ambitious. On 29 June 1940, eleven weeks after the birth of her fourth son Max, Diana was arrested (hastily stuffing Hitler's photograph under Max's cot mattress when the police came to arrest her) and taken to a cell in F Block in London's Holloway Prison for women.

Diana Mosley : A Life. I have frequently found such books give very little attention to the person's life before whatever significant event or events they are tied to. Here the author not only explores Mosley's childhood in depth, but also all the member of her immediate family. Far more impressively, the author somehow manages to seamlessly maintain the family backdrop throughout Mosley's life. To me, I greatly appreciate a book that has, for lack of a better term, an even approach throughout.

Diana Mosley lives in Paris. Written in superb English. The real story of an undomitable, elegant, clever and definitely English lady

Diana Mosley lives in Paris. She received her first lessons in politics at the feet of Winston Churchill, whose children Randolph and Diana were her best friends. She was married to Bryan Guinness when she fell in love with Oswald Mosley, then a Labour MP who had deserted both the Labour and Tory party and was about to set up his own party, the British Union of Fascists. The real story of an undomitable, elegant, clever and definitely English lady. Should be enjoyed by every fan of Downton Abbey as being the real thing.

Diana Mosley (Paperback). Please provide me with your latest book news, views and details of Waterstones’ special offers. Jan Dalley's fascinating and undeceived biography cuts through the mythology that has been built up around the Mitford sisters and around the Mosleys and reveals the truth about both an extraordinary life and the web of anti-semitism that stretched through the English aristocracy between the wars.

Diana Mosley: A biography. has been added to your Cart While this book may seem interesting to those unfamiliar with the writings by and about the Mitford sisters, to a rabid Mitford fan it may fall flat. has been added to your Cart. Dalley's only explanation for her subject's fascist activities is that she was deeply in love with Oswald. While this book may seem interesting to those unfamiliar with the writings by and about the Mitford sisters, to a rabid Mitford fan it may fall flat.

Diana Mosley By JAN DALLEY Knopf. Among them, but a creature apart, was Diana Mosley, wife of the fascist leader. She was thirty, a brilliant blonde with porcelain skin and bright blue eyes, and an acknowledged society beauty. She seemed to have lived a whole life already

Diana Mosley By JAN DALLEY Knopf. In the F block of Holloway prison, it was just possible to see out of the high windows, peering between the studded iron bars, by standing on a table or chair pushed against the wall. She seemed to have lived a whole life already. Married at eighteen to Bryan Guinness, one of the richest young men in England, she had become the centre of an artistic and social set that included writers, painters and thinkers as well as pleasure-seekers.

Diana Mosley: A Biography by Jan Dalley Faber, 297 pp, £2. 0, October 1997, ISBN 0 571 14448 9. In the autumn of 1980 I was leafing through the latest number of Books and Bookmen and came across a notice of Hans-Otto Meissner’s biography of Magda Goebbels

Diana Mosley: A Biography by Jan Dalley Faber, 297 pp, £2. In the autumn of 1980 I was leafing through the latest number of Books and Bookmen and came across a notice of Hans-Otto Meissner’s biography of Magda Goebbels. Fair enough, I thought, she had at least known the woman. Indeed, as she put it herself: ‘I knew Magda and Dr Goebbels quite well.

Born into the celebrated Mitford family in 1910 and married at 18 to Bryan Guinness, Diana Mosley was part of a sparkling society circle which included the leading artists and intellectuals of the time: Evelyn Waugh dedicated "Vile Bodies" to her. Then, at the age of 22, she fell in love with Oswald Mosley and committed her life to his ideas. In Germany she was a friend to Hitler and Goebbels; by 1940 she was in a damp cell in Holloway prison. Drawing on fresh interviews with Diana - whose views are as controversial today as they were then - this is a revealing biography of the wife of the most hated British politician of the century.

Rocksmith
Ms. Dalley does a superb job of detailing Diana Mosley's life. Her book is comparable to Anne de Courcy's biography of Diana but has a number of additional details. Her portrayal of Diana as an intellectual who is also a bon vivant is quite accurate. She also somewhat emulates Diana in her own role as an author who offers a bit of sarcasm. I think that is a very good trait!
Zulkigis
I disagree with the reviews that complain that the subject is not atacked for her political views. It is a obvious that anyone tied who can be directly tied to this view during this period and is established as an anti-semite is morally reprehensible. The author does not and should not even try to attack those views as that is not the purpose of the book. The purpose is to follow the journey of Mosley from aristocratic child to spouse of an anti-Semitic fascist leader and beyond. As to post-war discussions, of course, any normal person would be disgusted by much of Mosley's conduct. Still, that is part of the story.

As is obvious, this is one of those biographies devoted to the life of someone who one might assume to be a secondary or even a minor, if any, influence on history. As the wife of the leader of the consolidated fascist union in the years proceeding world war two, one might view Diana Mosley as someone simply in the shadow of her husband. The author surprised me with an extremely well written insight into the significant role of this woman, not in relationship to others, but as to her conduct and accomplishments, for right or wrong, throughout her life. Instead of explaining her in the context of other people, the author discusses events and other people in the context of Mosley.

As pointed out above, this book goes against the usual approach of biographies of "secondary" personalities on the world stage. I have frequently found such books give very little attention to the person's life before whatever significant event or events they are tied to. Here the author not only explores Mosley's childhood in depth, but also all the member of her immediate family. Far more impressively, the author somehow manages to seamlessly maintain the family backdrop throughout Mosley's life. To me, I greatly appreciate a book that has, for lack of a better term, an even approach throughout. I do not care for books, particularly biographies, that start almost abruptly with a short chapter on childhood, then devotes the huge majority on the primary issues of history involved, and finally again almost abruptly ends with a short chapter about death and/or retirement. The greatest strength of this book in my humble opinion is that common flaw is absent here.

Finally, the author had took an unusual approach to her sources, both primary and secondary. She relied a great deal on books written by Mosley's sisters and other contemporaries. Likewise, she also relied a great deal on information she acquired directly from Mosley. An academic might have some problems with her approach, as she did not bury the manuscript in footnotes, but it is effective. Where relevant, the author simply cites the materials as the basis of the information in the text. This approach is perhaps a result of the author being a journalist and not an historian. However, that certainly should not be held against her, as William Shirer has demonstrated.

Again, I do not hold myself out as an expert of the period. Still, I have read a number of books dealing with the extension of both the fascist and communist movements in a number of democracies including the United States, England, France and South Africa. Based on my previous readings, I had an almost myopic view of fascism in England embodied solely in the person of Oswald Mosley. Besides giving me an excellent insight into the British young aristocratic society in the pre-war years, this book also gave me a new view of the specific workings of the British fascist movement. If you are interested in such things, I would strongly suggest you give this book a read.