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by Amanda J. Parr
Download The True and Complete Story of Machine Gun Jack McGurn fb2
  • Author:
    Amanda J. Parr
  • ISBN:
    1905237138
  • ISBN13:
    978-1905237135
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Matador (April 5, 2007)
  • Pages:
    316 pages
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1332 kb
  • ePUB format
    1230 kb
  • DJVU format
    1153 kb
  • Rating:
    4.1
  • Votes:
    749
  • Formats:
    rtf txt docx lrf


Jack "Machine Gun Jack" McGurn (born Vincenzo Antonio Gibaldi; Italian: ; July 2, 1902 – February 15. .Parr, Amanda J. (2005). The True and Complete Story of Machine Gun Jack McGurn. Gusfield, Jeffrey (2012).

Jack "Machine Gun Jack" McGurn (born Vincenzo Antonio Gibaldi; Italian: ; July 2, 1902 – February 15, 1936) was a small-time boxer, Sicilian-American mobster and key member of Al Capone's Chicago Outfit. Deadly Valentines: The Story of Capone's Henchman "Machine Gun" Jack McGurn and Louise Rolfe, His Blonde Alibi.

Amanda Jayne Parr as Want to Read . Set against the colourful backdrop of prohibition-era Chicago, this book tells the true life story of 'Machine Gun' Jack McGurn, the most flamboyant and prolific hit man, bodyguard and trusted confidant of the infamous 'Scarface' Al Capone

Amanda Jayne Parr as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. Set against the colourful backdrop of prohibition-era Chicago, this book tells the true life story of 'Machine Gun' Jack McGurn, the most flamboyant and prolific hit man, bodyguard and trusted confidant of the infamous 'Scarface' Al Capone.

a b c The true and complete story of 'machine gun' Jack McGurn by Amanda Jayne Parr p. 44. Reppetto, Thomas A. American Mafia: a history of its rise to power p. 9. Lombardo, Robert M. The Black Hand: Terror by Letter in Chicago p. 6

a b c The true and complete story of 'machine gun' Jack McGurn by Amanda Jayne Parr p. 6. After Capone: the life and world of Chicago mob boss Frank "the Enforcer" Nitti By Mars Eghigian, J. Frank Nitti p. 42. Critchley, David The origin of organized crime in America: the New York City mafia, 1891-1931 p. 4

Once described by crime boss Sam Giancana, as the 'archetypal movie star gangster, 'Machine Gun Jack McGurn, not only offers a unique insight into the life an.

Once described by crime boss Sam Giancana, as the 'archetypal movie star gangster, 'Machine Gun Jack McGurn, not only offers a unique insight into the life an.

This book cannot be sold in the us as we do not have us rights for IT.

Biography and True Stories. The True and Complete Story of Machine Gun Jack McGurn: Chief Bodyguard and Hit Man to Chicago's Most Infamous Crime Czar Al Capone and Mastermind of the St. Valentines Day Massacre by Amanda J. Parr. The True and Complete Story of Machine Gun Jack McGurn By Amanda J. Unfortunately we do not have a summary for this item at the moment. Our excellent value books literally don't cost the earth.

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Published September 1, 2005 by Matador. There's no description for this book yet.

The True and Complete Story of Machine Gun Jack McGurn. 1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read. Are you sure you want to remove The True and Complete Story of Machine Gun Jack McGurn from your list? The True and Complete Story of Machine Gun Jack McGurn. Published September 1, 2005 by Matador.

The True and Complete Story of Machine Gun Jack McGurn: Chief Bodyguard and Hit Man to Chicago's Most Infamous Crime Czar Al Capone and Mastermind of the St. Valentine's Day Massacre. Leicester: Troubador Publishing Lt. 2005. Kelly, Robert J. Encyclopedia of Organized Crime in the United States. Westport, Connecticut: Greenwood Press, 2000.


Longitude Temporary
Author Amanda Parr has written an entertaining, but inaccurate account of Machine Gun Jack McGurn. I wanted to so much like this book, because an authorative book on Jack McGurn is needed. However, Amanda Parr is not the one to write it. I found several errors in the book such as the location of the death of Tony Lombardo and Frank Nitti. Lombardo was shot in downtown Chicago, and not in Cicero. Nitti committed suicide near railroad tracks with his body propped up against a fence, and not in his basement as author Parr states. Parr says the bodies of Scalise, Anselmi, and "Hop Toad" Guinta "just disappeared" following their being clubbed to death by Capone. The bodies of Scalise and Anselmi were returned to Sicily while Guinta is buried in Mount Carmel Cemetery. Parr says he isn't, but I took a photograph of his headstone. These were only some of the errors I found which lead me to suspect the rest of the book. Yes, the book is, indeed, an entertaining read, but I don't believe it is a factual account of McGurn's life. Perhaps Chicago Assassin coming out in early 2008 will be more factual.
Shakagul
...unfortunately it claims to be a true account. I corresponded with the author shortly before the book came out in the hope some of my questions could be answered, but was I saw what she wrote she was unable to justify her conclusions. Her main theory is that McGurn's father changed his name to that of McGurn's wife. Didn't make sense to me either. Not only that, but Demora (or Demory) was not even her maiden name. If she were to re-release this as a romance novel (while correcting her geographical and historical errors), this might have a chance. For now, especially considering the expense, it's just not worth it.
Tori Texer
good read
Oparae
This biography of Jack McGurn contains misinformation and serious factual errors. The author obviously did some research, but she took sources at face value without looking for other sources to verify or disprove the information. Easily checked information, like dates and names, are sometimes wrong. She has fictionalized some events and includes conjecture as fact. The book has no notes, citations, or bibliography.
doesnt Do You
A great book written about Machine Gun Jack McGurn and the Prohibition era in Chicago. It will definitely keep your interest while reading it.
Adrielmeena
i got thebook and i read it in two days and lo ned it to a friend who loaned it to a friend and so on and so on, i haven't gotten it back becaujse its so good.
Naktilar
Reading two biographies on the same person back-to-back can expand one's understanding as each author chooses to focus on different parts of the subject's life.

And so, I recently read both of the biographies of Machinegun Jack McGurn published this year. (The other is "Chicago Assassin" by Richard Shmelter which I have reviewed as well).

The differences are, regrettably, too great. Was McGurn's father (a restaurant owner) killed by the Black Hand in Chicago, as Parr tells us, or was he (a barber) gunned down in a case of mistaken identity by a New York gang, and his step-father (a grocer) murdered by the Genna gang in Chicago? Did McGurn kill Troppea on April 20, 1923 (Parr) or on Feb 15, 1926 (Shmelter, citing to the Chicago Tribune)? Was the 1932 movie Scarface "banned until after World War II," as Parr tells us, or was it one of the top ten movies in 1932? (as stated in Capone, by Laurence Bergreen.) Was U.S. Attorney Johnson appointed to the US Senate "subject to formal election by the serving Senators," only to see his appointment lapse at the end of the Hoover administration (Parr) or did Hoover nominate him to Federal Judge, which appointment lapsed when he was not confirmed (Bergreen). To continue with these examples would be pointless. The differences between Parr and Shmelter and Bergreen are so great as to be irreconcilable. Both Shmelter and Bergreen use extensive footnotes to support their statements of fact; Parr does not. Parr must, therefore, be read with caution.

That said, Parr makes an effort to understand, as she puts it "how a boy who reaches the age of eighteen without committing a single criminal act ...[can] evolve into one of mob history's most prolific and notorious hit men." That question is, of course, what makes the story of McGurn of continuing interest.

Parr's description of McGurn as a man "who appeared capable of making a distinction between killing and murder" shows her ability to seek to understand McGurn by the code of the world in which he lived, not merely by our own age's code, and in so doing Parr helps the reader see beyond the headlines into the complexity of the human being. That effort is some compensation for her flaws in research.

Throughout the book, Parr reports the inner thoughts of McGurn and of many other characters. Schmelter reports what McGurn did, and what he said he thought. Parr seems to know what her characters actually thought. (Did McGurn, as he cased Troppea, fight "to restrain himself, battling the desire to kill the callous degenerate there and then. Somehow he managed to restrain himself." Perhaps so and we have the image of an emotional man, not a cold, controlled professional.) These insights into what McGurn and others were thinking brings a rich novelistic depth to her characters.

Unfortunately, that is not biography.

If you read only one book on McGurn, it should be Shmelter's.
This is the worst 'true crime' book on the market. This is so bad that one can only finish if they make a game out of it such as -Count the Mistakes. Do not waste your time or money. Someone please write an acurate book on McGurn, it really would be a great book topic if done properly.