Download Constantine fb2

by Professor of History and Head of the School of History and Heritage Paul Stephenson
Download Constantine fb2
Leaders & Notable People
  • Author:
    Professor of History and Head of the School of History and Heritage Paul Stephenson
  • ISBN:
    0857381660
  • ISBN13:
    978-0857381668
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Quercus Publishing; UK ed. edition (August 1, 2011)
  • Pages:
    352 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Leaders & Notable People
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1350 kb
  • ePUB format
    1709 kb
  • DJVU format
    1914 kb
  • Rating:
    4.1
  • Votes:
    146
  • Formats:
    mbr lrf doc lit


Paul Stephenson's examination of Constantine's enduring legacy on the history of the West and his contribution to the spread of Christianity is a rare book that combines individual biography with cultural and social trends seamlessly

Paul Stephenson's examination of Constantine's enduring legacy on the history of the West and his contribution to the spread of Christianity is a rare book that combines individual biography with cultural and social trends seamlessly. He successfully traces Constantine's life in the context of the broader historical forces at work during his reign and places equal significance on both the individual contributions that Constantine made and social/political circumstances that coincided with them.

Where previous histories have been concerned principally with the medieval history of distinct and . It also examines the changing conception of the frontier in Byzantine thought and literature through the middle Byzantine period.

Where previous histories have been concerned principally with the medieval history of distinct and autonomous Balkan nations, this study regards Byzantine political authority as a unifying factor in the various lands which formed the empire's frontier in the north and west.

Professor of History and Head of the School of History and Heritage Paul Stephenson.

Reader and Head of School. Administrative Staff. Tracy Pritchard Williams. Professor of Archaeology & Heritage. Dr Nikolaos Papadogiannis. Lecturer in Modern and Contemporary History, Postgraduate Taught Lead. Lecturer in History and Archaeology, Pastoral Care Lead History. Professor of Welsh History. Lecturer in Modern History, Director of Teaching and Learning. Dr Euryn Rhys Roberts.

In this book, Paul Stephenson twists together multiple strands to relate the cultural biography of a unique monument. Paul Stephenson has set a new landmark and a new benchmark in writing the history of objects and the writing of history through objects. A Cultural Biography. Onassis Series in Hellenic Culture. He is, however, the first to label his work a cultural biography.

About Paul Stephenson: Paul Stephenson studies the early and middle . Press and Profile Books Before coming to Nijmegen, he was for five years Professor of Medieval History at Durham University, and for six year before that th. .

About Paul Stephenson: Paul Stephenson studies the early and middle Byzantine periods (. Press and Profile Books. Stephenson has taught in the UK, Republic of Paul Stephenson studies the early and middle Byzantine periods (. Before coming to Nijmegen, he was for five years Professor of Medieval History at Durham University, and for six year before that the Rowe Professor of Byzantine History at Dumbarton Oaks and the University of Wisconsin - Madison. In 2011-12 he was Vassiliadis Visiting Professor of History at the University of California, San Diego.

Regius Professorship of History is one of the senior chairs in history at the University of Cambridge. It was founded in 1724 by George I as the Regius Professorship of Modern History. The Regius Professorship was originally intended by George I to teach contemporary European history, to correct "the prejudice that has accrued to the. University from this Defect, Persons of Foreign Nations being often employed in the Education and Tuition of Youth"

Professor of Irish History and Literature. Professor of Renaissance History and Culture, and Co-director of the Centre for Renaissance and Early Modern Studies (CREMS).

Professor of Irish History and Literature. ArtsTwo . 0 ro. oster. 3 +44 (0)207 882 5724 .

Introduction: Innovative and interdisciplinary approaches are needed to improve mental health and psychosocial outcomes of people with criminal justice involvement and their families. The Art of Cultural Exchange: translation and transformation between the UK and Brazil.

'Constantine' surveys the life and enduring legacy of the greatest and most unjustly ignored of the later Roman emperors, offering a comprehensive account of the cultural and spiritual renewal of the Roman Empire and the idea of a unified Christian Europe.

Shadowbourne
A non-scholarly written book but still chock full of data. It helped me in my research. I recommend the book as a compact source of data on Constantine's battles. In that, the author did a solid job. So, if pretentious scholarship puts you off, this book is for you.
Murn
OK
Mr_TrOlOlO
Stephenson's account of Constantine's life is deep in detail about the ceremonies and rituals of pagan Roman religion, particularly in regards to its employment in the Roman army. Simply put, the religious rituals of pagan life were essential in shaping and expressing a soldier's loyalty to the army. A soldier publicly swore allegiance to his commanders and mates via the scheduled rituals and deity worship. How the focus of this allegiance switched from the Roman gods to Jesus Christ in the course of Constantine's lifetime is a good story. You had to been very brave to be a Christian soldier in the early days, and to ignore the pagan rituals of your unit -- you could be jailed or executed for that. Apparently, many soldiers quietly worshiped Christ in private while publicly attending the army rituals, an expedient that made the spread of Christianity within the army easier.

Stephenson elaborates that it was not necessarily goodness, humility, and peaceful love of mankind that motivated Constantine's devotion to Christ, but victory and conquest. Before the battle of the Milvian Bridge (in a civil war between Constantine and another Roman general, for total control of the empire), Constantine reportedly saw light in the sky in the form of the cross, with the inscription, In Hoc Signo Vinces or "with this sign, you will conquer". And he did conquer -- he emerged victorous over his Roman and barbarian enemies repeatedly. And he apparently credited his victories to his belief in and acceptance of Christ.

Constantine ended the persecution of Christians in the empire, and made possible the spread of Christianity, which no doubt benefited the empire. Yet this saint was also astoundingly cruel. Throughout his career as emperor, he eliminated his political enemies and their families with murderous thoroughness. He erased all traces of his victims. Did he really order the murder of his young wife and his own son? Apparently so. In the Eastern Orthodox Church, we celebrate the day of Constantine and Helen (his mother). Yet, I can't think of him in a noble light after reading this book.

Stephenson is candid about not trusting the various histories and sources -- many were propaganda tracts controlled by Constantine or his allies, or were the opposite, anti-Constantine narratives by pagan historians. Thus, an intimate portrait of the man never emerges in the book. What was he like in conversation? Was he quick to anger? Did he like dogs? Did he like good food? What were his friends like? None of the details are there, and that's pretty frustrating.

This is a meticulous book, and seems excellent if you want to understand how Christianity emerged in the Roman world. It's interesting to read that the Christian practice of attending to the sick and dying during the plague greatly increased Christianity's appeal, partly because of the moral virtues displayed by Christian doctors and aides, and because those helpful Christians who survived built up immunity to the plague, something which their pagan cousins missed out on as they fled the cities (and thus carried the plague with them to their pagan families in other villages and cities). The book might be a bit too deep for some readers in the details of Roman army camp rituals, the significance of the images on minted coins, the meaning of carvings and plaques. I found myself wishing for less of that, and more about the man Constantine, and his reforms and actions.
Grokinos
Paul Stephenson's examination of Constantine's enduring legacy on the history of the West and his contribution to the spread of Christianity is a rare book that combines individual biography with cultural and social trends seamlessly. He successfully traces Constantine's life in the context of the broader historical forces at work during his reign and places equal significance on both the individual contributions that Constantine made and social/political circumstances that coincided with them. His analysis suggests that there were social movements afoot that would have supported the rapid rise of Christianity within the empire but that Constantine's conversion and the official Roman embracement of the relatively new religion accelerated this process. Constantine's establishment of a new capital for the eastern Empire at Constantinople and the subsequent collapse of Rome created the environment for the melding of Church and State that characterized the Eastern Empire. He established Government structures that survive to this day in the Roman Catholic Church such as the organization of Diocese.

Overall this is a very well written and interesting treatment of a fascinating time with specific focus on the leading historical figure of the era. Great book.
Zololmaran
What a joke! the whole historic perspective of his dream and reasons for the conquest is pure fiction