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by John A. Farrell
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Leaders & Notable People
  • Author:
    John A. Farrell
  • ISBN:
    0316260495
  • ISBN13:
    978-0316260497
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Little, Brown; 1st edition (March 2001)
  • Pages:
    784 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Leaders & Notable People
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1897 kb
  • ePUB format
    1991 kb
  • DJVU format
    1699 kb
  • Rating:
    4.9
  • Votes:
    220
  • Formats:
    mbr rtf txt lit


John Aloysius Farrell is an American author. He has written biographies of . President Richard Nixon, House Speaker Thomas "Tip" O'Neill, and defense attorney Clarence Darrow.

John Aloysius Farrell is an American author. On January 2, 2017, the New York Times reported that historian Farrell had unearthed notes written by Nixon aide .

John A. Farrell's "Tip O'Neill and the Democratic Century" earns a place with the finest works of journalism and political history - first because the author sets himself two lofty goals, and second because he accomplishes both of them in grand fashion. First, Farrell's book is a wonderful portrait of a preeminent New Deal politician - a man who not only came of age in the Great Depression, but who also found his political moorings there.

Start by marking Tip O'Neill and the Democratic Century: A Biography  . Tip O'Neill had a fascinating yet complicated life The bes I read this book because I really enjoyed Farrell's biography o. .

Start by marking Tip O'Neill and the Democratic Century: A Biography as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Tip O'Neill had a fascinating yet complicated life. Farrell does a great job at analyzing his New Deal philosophy coupled with his Boston smoked filled back room dealing style in the 40's up to the 80's. The bes I read this book because I really enjoyed Farrell's biography of Nixon (2017) and I admire his craft. I found the narrative well balanced and also very enlightening when it comes to the relationship between lawmakers in the House among themselves and with the executive branch.

Boston Globe reporter Farrell's biography of Thomas P. "Tip" O'Neill (1912-1994) is much like the subject himself . "Tip" O'Neill (1912-1994) is much like the subject himself: large, rambling, sentimental and thoroughly fascinating. Farrell, a winner of a George Polk Award, traces O'Neill's career from its beginning in the 1930s in the rough-and-tumble world of Boston politics to his ascendancy to Speaker of the . House of Representatives in 1977.

Farrell has created the definative biography on Tip O'Neill, the larger than life Speaker of the House in his first book. Tip O'Neill and the Democratic Century" is one of the best non-fiction works I have read in a very long time

Farrell has created the definative biography on Tip O'Neill, the larger than life Speaker of the House in his first book. Tip O'Neill and the Democratic Century" is one of the best non-fiction works I have read in a very long time. The length is a little daunting - 754 pages - but by the time I finished it, I wished that there were 754 more pages to go. Farrell's honest journalism has created a masterpiece! 0. Report.

Farrell, John A. (John Aloysius). Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Delaware County District Library (Ohio).

Web site of writer John Aloysius Farrell, author of Clarence Darrow: Attorney For The Damned, a biography of Americas greatest defense lawyer, and of Tip ONeill and the Democratic Century, a biography of the late House.

Web site of writer John Aloysius Farrell, author of Clarence Darrow: Attorney For The Damned, a biography of Americas greatest defense lawyer, and of Tip ONeill and the Democratic Century, a biography of the late House Speaker Thomas P. Tip ONeill J. It was published by Doubleday in June, 2011. Watch this page for a schedule of appearances by John A. Farrell. PagesMediaBooks and e Darrow: Attorney for the DamnedAbout.

John Farrell talked about his book Tip O’Neill and the Democratic Century: A Biography, published by Little, Brown & Company. Thomas Philip Tip O’Neill was the Speaker of the House for ten years. He served in Congress from 1953 through 1989 and saw some of the greatest moments of post-World War II American politics and the rise and decline of Democratic politics. Videotape clips of Mr. O’Neill were shown.

Free today on the Kindle: Tip O’Neill and the Democratic Century: A Biography by John A. He also runs Political Job Hunt, Electoral Vote Map and the Political Dictionary. Previously, he was a policy adviser to a . Senator and Governor. Goddard is also co-author of You Won - Now What? (Scribner, 1998), a political management book hailed by prominent journalists and politicians from both parties. In addition, Goddard's essays on politics and public policy have appeared in dozens of newspapers across the country. Farrell is the author of Clarence Darrow: Attorney for the Damned, which won the Los Angeles Times Book Prize for Biography, and Tip O'Neill and the Democratic Century, which was a New York Times Notable Book and a Washington Post Rave of the Year.

A stirring biography of the great politician and legendary Speaker of the House follows his career from the end of World War II to his struggles against Newt Gingrich. 50,000 first printing.

Drelalak
After reading John Farrell's recent book on Richard Nixon which was terrific, I decided to read his book on Tip O'Neill. This book was equally as well-written, insightful, informative, and thought-provoking. Not only is this book a look at one of the most colorful political figures during my lifetime, but it also proved to be a history of the Democratic Party since the New Deal. Although Tip O'Neill is best remembered for stressing that politics is local, he had instincts to make amazing transformations during his years in national public service in order to survive in Washington DC while in Congress. I highly recommend this book, especially to anyone interested in politics.
Windbearer
John A. Farrell's "Tip O'Neill and the Democratic Century" earns a place with the finest works of journalism and political history - first because the author sets himself two lofty goals, and second because he accomplishes both of them in grand fashion. First, Farrell's book is a wonderful portrait of a preeminent New Deal politician - a man who not only came of age in the Great Depression, but who also found his political moorings there. The central goal of Tip O'Neill's political philosophy was aiding his constituents, block-by-block and neighborhood-by-neighborhood. Farrell makes clear that the former Speaker had an intimate connection with the folks who elected him, and that, however high he rose, O'Neill was always eminently down-to-earth and approachable. In reading this book against the backdrop of a political culture has been overtaken by endless polling, focus groups and televised spinmeisters, it's reaffirming to know that there was a time not so long ago when a major politician chatted up voters in a local barbershop, or steadfastly bought his suits at the same haberdasher decade after decade.
A second, but no less significant achievement of Farrell's book, is as a detailed political history of the last century. If one only considers the two political figures that bookended O'Neill's career - at the start, Boston Mayor and flamboyant rogue James Michael Curley and at the end President Ronald Reagan - that gives a strong sense of just how much politics and public life changed over that 50 or so years. O'Neill began his career in a time when concern about the size of government was subsidiary to the goals it was intended to accomplish; a time when politicians and the public were trained on eradicating societal ills such as poverty, homelessness, joblessness, illiteracy and so on. By the time O'Neill left public life, the size and efficiency of government, particularly spending on domestic social programs, was a drum for self-proclaimed fiscal hawks to bang. Speaker O'Neill left public life in a time when Social Darwinism and exploitation of the "alienated voter" defined political discourse; a time when selfishness, greed, retrenchment from public life, and resentment of the veterans, the poor, the sick, and the mentally ill were rampant. So thoroughly denuded were the ideals of O'Neill's earlier career that President Reagan could connect with a wide swath of voters by repeatedly telling a false story about a Chicago "welfare queen" who rode around in a limousine and who ate lobster for dinner every night. Farrell shows O'Neill as someone who railed publicly against Reagan and his ilk, and who considered the President, "an Irishman who forgot where he came from." Indeed, Farrell includes wonderful color about O'Neill and his wildly divergent private and public relationships with Reagan. In the end, Farrell's book succeeds because it brings its subject into full bloom; he paints pictures not only of O'Neill, but also of the times in which he lived and politicked. And that is what lifts this biography to the level of greatness.
Sudert
Excellent biography of Tip O'Neill. The speaker was always in my consciousness as a child in the late 1970's and 1980's, but I new so little about the man who stood up to Reagan. This biography is a great overview of Tip's childhood, life, and his eventual entrance onto the world stage in a very public way. Furthermore, the book is very accessible and easy to read. It provides enough facts to understand Tip O'Neill, but not so many as to get bogged down in detailed minutia. A great balance for any biography.

If you want to learn more about Tip O'Neill, and what made him a great leader, I highly recommend this book.
Gavidor
75 years ago, in a vastly different America, Jack Farrell recounts the common story of a middle class life rising from second generation immigrants, and the uncommon story of this personable young man's political career. O'Neill has the sincere and steady convictions of one who knows his family's luck and struggle with the charm and street smarts of the leader of the street corner boys in the Irish neighborhood of Cambridge, MA. On more than one occasion he found himself at the crossroads of "the road less taken", and moved in that direction: able, astute, and counting the odds. A great American urban story of a great American politician. Even for the unbiased this is a very good read.
Zieryn
This is an extraordinary biography of someone who played a major role in American history. Even when O'Neill was not the driving force, he the reader can witness some of the extraordinary events in the twentieth century through his eyes. Love him, hate him, or don't even know about him, Tip O'Neill lived a life worth retelling, and Farrell's work accomplishes just that. Rereading the book after several years, I was impressed how well it stands the test of time and remains compelling and informative today. The stories within the larger arc of the book are never tedious, doing a superb job of telling readers about the man himself and the people who share the stage with him -- flaws and all. Politics was different then -- probably better -- but this is less a nostalgic tale than a story for the ages.
just one girl
This book completely and utterly succeeds in its twin goals of documenting Mr. O'Neil's political career and the twentieth century American political history that went with it. O'Neil is a fascinating character, and both his good and bad points are beautifully and dramatically brought out by the author. Although the author is sympathetic towards O'Neil, he is not sainted by this book - his ethics scandals and his 1980 election failures are as carefully yet succinctly documented as his successes, particularly as he basically stood alone against Reagan in the early 1980s. He was a product of his early political/ New Deal life, and the book does a good job of contrasting his stances versus the generations of Democrats and Republicans that he worked with in the 1970s and 1980s. Well worth the time it takes to read the 700 pages, most of which fly by.
Bolv
I'm a fan of the Paul Harvey concept "now for the rest of the story". This book by a Boston person touches the bases and gives the rest of the story of a good man who lived a good, happy, and useful life.