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by Sherry Rosenthal,Stephen Nasser
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Leaders & Notable People
  • Author:
    Sherry Rosenthal,Stephen Nasser
  • ISBN:
    1932173099
  • ISBN13:
    978-1932173093
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Stephens Press LLC; FIFTH PRINTING edition (January 1, 2010)
  • Pages:
    232 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Leaders & Notable People
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1701 kb
  • ePUB format
    1744 kb
  • DJVU format
    1324 kb
  • Rating:
    4.4
  • Votes:
    678
  • Formats:
    txt rtf lrf doc


My Brother's Voice by Stephen Nasser is about his experience in the Holocaust.

My Brother's Voice by Stephen Nasser is about his experience in the Holocaust. I found this book very interesting, but at times it almost broke my heart reading it. The author and his older brother were shipped to Auschwitz in 1944 with other family members and the author was the only survivor. Two or three times the author was beaten so badly by the Nazis his story could have ended right there. Amazingly enough, the author survived, coming to the United States in the late 1940's, is now married and has three grandchildren. To me this book seemed to be told in the voice of a thirteen year old, the authors age when deported.

My Brother's Voice - Stephen Nasser. the Holocaust: A True Story. with Sherry Rosenthal. Only then was I free to tell my story. How a Young Hungarian Boy Survived. Stephens Press, Las Vegas, Nevada. The secret that kept me silent so long is finally revealed within these pages, since it can hurt him no more. I dedicate this book to the memory of my parents, and above all, to the memory of my older brother Andris.

My Brother's Voice book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking My Brother's Voice: How a Young Hungarian Boy Survived the Holocaust: A True Story as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Stephen Nasser & Sherry Rosenthal.

My Brother's Voice: How a Young Hungarian Boy Survived the Holocaust: A True Story (Unabridged). Stephen Nasser & Sherry Rosenthal. Stephen 'Pista' Nasser was 13 years old when the Nazis whisked him and his family away from their home in Hungary to Auschwitz. His memories of that terrifying experience are still vivid, and his love for his brother Andris still brings a husky tone to his voice when he remembers the terrible ordeal they endured together.

Stephen Nasser survived. His story is painstakingly unembellished so that we will know what really happened. A free teacher’s resource guide for exploring Holocaust issues, classroom assignments and.

Stephen Nasser somehow dug deep within his soul to survive the brutal . A must read exceptional bravery in the face of evil

Stephen Nasser somehow dug deep within his soul to survive the brutal and inhumane treatment his captors inflicted on t. .Books related to My Brother's Voice: How a Young Hungarian Boy Survived the Holocaust: A True Story. A must read exceptional bravery in the face of evil. by Caroline Carmichael on March 22, 2019. My Brother's Voice: How a Young Hungarian Boy Survived the Holocaust: A True Story.

Stephen Nasser somehow dug deep within his soul to survive the brutal and inhumane treatement his captors inflicted on the .

Stephen Nasser somehow dug deep within his soul to survive the brutal and inhumane treatement his captors inflicted on the Jews. He was the only one of his family to survive-but the memory of his brother's dying words compelled him to live.

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Stephen Nasser somehow dug deep within his soul to survive the brutal and inhumane treatment his captors inflicted on the Jews

Stephen Nasser somehow dug deep within his soul to survive the brutal and inhumane treatment his captors inflicted on the Jews.

book by Stephen Nasser. Stephen Nasser somehow dug deep within his soul to survive the brutal and inhumane treatement his captors inflicted on the Jews. Stephen Nasser somehow dug deep within his soul to survive the brutal and inhumane treatment his captors inflicted on the Jews. He was the only one of his family to survive.

Stephen Nasser somehow dug deep within his soul to survive the brutal and inhumane treatment his captors inflicted on the Jews. He was the only one of his family to survive--but the memory of his brother's dying words compelled him to live. Stephen's account of the Holocaust, told in the refreshingly direct and optimistic language of a young boy, appeals to both younger audiences and his contemporaries. Written in a straight forward, narrative style, Nasser avoids the cloying or maudlin language that characterizes some stories of the Holocaust. Perhaps it's for that reason readers will find his book one they won't forget--and one they recommend to others as a "must read."

Tori Texer
My Brother's voice did not leave my hands from the moment I picked it up, until the last page was read. I can't even remember my day of flights and layovers because my mind and heart were completely engrossed.

Stephen Nasser was 13 years old when he was pulled from his comfortable and loving home in Hungary, spending endless days in a cattle car, arriving in Auschwitz only to witness the brutal murder of his infant cousin Peter at the hands of an SS officer hours after arriving. He and his brother cling to one another, drawing the strength to continue through months of inhumane treatment and brutal forced labor. Stephen's resoursefulness allows he and his brother to stay together through their move from Auschwitz to a forced labor camp, and helps him survive the unimaginably difficult conditions he faced. Finally liberated from a death train by American troops, a gravely ill Stephen begins to rebuild his life, the only surviving member of his family, in Hungary and eventually travels to Cananda and the U.S.

Mr. Nasser's unflinching and detailed description of his experiences are full of emotion, and yet are told from the straightforward and optimistic perspective of a child. It's a heartbreaking combination that paints a vivid picture of a beautiful, shining young soul in the midst of utter despair.

Now living in Las Vegas, Stephen Nasser has been tirelessly sharing his story with students and community groups for the past several years. He has given over 700 presentations and was recently awarded a Humanitarian award by the FBI. Because his education ceased before his deportation, he never graduated from High School. I was very moved to see that he was recently presented with a High School diploma from Las Vegas High school for both himself, and for his brother.

Mr. Nasser is an inspiration. He has lived through something that I, a Midwesterner in my 30's, will never be able to fully comprehend. His ability to tell his heartbreaking life story, through his book and to live audiences, must be very difficult and i admire his strength and determination. I am inspired by his optimistic spirit and his generosity to his community. This book is a must read!
THOMAS
I just finished My Brother's Voice and I am so heartbroken over everything this young boy endured yet I'm moved beyond words that he was able to survive the horror and create a new life for himself. His parents and his brother did not survive the Holocaust. The story Mr. Nasser tells had to wait until his uncle passed away because he couldn't bear for his uncle to know how his grandchild was killed. Every Holocaust book I read astounds me more and more that this was the world of Europe. How did an alleged civilized society all rally around the little house painter from Austria and commit such horrible crimes in his name. I'm so glad 'Pista' finally told his story. I read it in one sitting as I had to know what happened to them all, what secret did he keep from his uncle, how did he make it out alive, and whether he had a full life afterwards. An excellent story, very beautifully written. I can't even bear to pick up another book just yet. Thank you for sharing your history, Pista.
Roram
I have read many books on the Holocaust and it seems that each one has an awful account of a horrible time. Mr. Nasser's story was fast paced with very little hate given to his captors. He seemed to get through his ordeal with great determination and a will to survive for his older brother. I am sure some of his memories might not be 100% accurate but I believe he did his best to describe a time and place that took so much away from him. I have read reviews that have stated that two many irregularities. I cheered for his positive outlook and his will to survive. This is a wonderful story, I just wish it had gone on and explain what happened when he got to America. I am so glad Mr. Nasser survived, I and I am so sorry for all he lost. I think the love the brothers had for each other was a testament to how important the love of family is. Thank you for telling your story. For those of you who have belittled his account, I ask you "Were you there"? If not just accept that someone lived this atrocity and let them tell their story.
Corgustari
The Holocaust was a horrible event in our history, but have doubts this book is a true factual story. I stopped reading half way through today. The train stopping and having the Red Cross feed prisoners seemed very odd. Somehow both author and brother going into Auschwitz and not getting tattooed seems very unlikely. Then escaping Auschwitz on a work detail so easily by just trading places with a couple others was very troubling, IMO the book may be more fiction than fact.
Make no mistake the Holocaust is the darkest event in our history and love educating myself and family about why we can't let this ever happen again. I just have doubts about this stories accuracy.

Update: I'll leave my original thoughts but please read the response (comment) from Sue. She cleared up some of my doubts.
Direbringer
My Brother's Voice by Stephen Nasser is about his experience in the Holocaust. I found this book very interesting, but at times it almost broke my heart reading it. The author and his older brother were shipped to Auschwitz in 1944 with other family members and the author was the only survivor. From Auschwitz, he and his brother smuggled themselves onto a train bound for Muhldorf, a slave labor camp in Bavaria. Two or three times the author was beaten so badly by the Nazis his story could have ended right there. Amazingly enough, the author survived, coming to the United States in the late 1940's, is now married and has three grandchildren. To me this book seemed to be told in the voice of a thirteen year old, the authors age when deported. That was one of the things I liked the most about My Brother's Voice. An excellent read that I highly recommend.