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by W. Andrew Hoffecker
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Leaders & Notable People
  • Author:
    W. Andrew Hoffecker
  • ISBN:
    0875526586
  • ISBN13:
    978-0875526584
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    P & R Publishing (November 1, 2011)
  • Pages:
    464 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Leaders & Notable People
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1660 kb
  • ePUB format
    1870 kb
  • DJVU format
    1878 kb
  • Rating:
    4.3
  • Votes:
    920
  • Formats:
    lrf mbr doc azw


Andrew Hoffecker writes with great affection for Hodge, with the good judgment of a seasoned historian. Seven simple words uttered by Dr. John Frame prompted me to pick up Charles Hodge: The Pride of Princeton by W. Andrew Hoffecker.

Andrew Hoffecker writes with great affection for Hodge, with the good judgment of a seasoned historian. Anyone interested in 19th century America, Presbyterian history, church and state, or Calvinism will learn much from Dr. Hoffecker's book. The author makes a solid contribution in P & R's American Reformed Biographies Series. I first encountered Charles Hodge in Seminary.

Andrew Hoffecker’s book gives the reader a good feel for Hodge as a person, but focuses particularly on. .Continuing with the series of American Reformed Biographies is "Charles Hodge Tje Pride of Princeton".

Andrew Hoffecker’s book gives the reader a good feel for Hodge as a person, but focuses particularly on how he responded to and shaped Presbyt This biography of Presbyterian theologian Charles Hodge will probably be of most interest to theology students, some lay Presbyterians, and those interested in the history of nineteenth-century American religious thought. To some, the name of Charles Hodge may be familiar only through the name on the spine of a three-volume systematic theology.

Andrew Hoffecker’s biography of Charles Hodge is a wonderfully entertaining and informative read. Hodge is one of the historic giants of Presbyterianism, combining the virtues of scholarship, churchmanship, and a delightful personal-ity. In his Charles Hodge: The Pride of Princeton, he has given us a long-needed biography of Hodge that is properly sympathetic-and critical-with careful attention to the life and thought of this many-sided man. This book provides great reading for Princeton Seminary’s bicentennial in 2012. David Calhoun, Professor Emeritus of Church History, Covenant Theo-logical Seminary. Hodge is one of the historic giants of Presbyterianism, combining the virtues of scholarship, churchmanship, and a delightful personality

Andrew Hoffecker’s biography of Charles Hodge is a wonderfully entertaining and informative read. Hodge is one of the historic giants of Presbyterianism, combining the virtues of scholarship, churchmanship, and a delightful personality. For those who may have read some of his writings but know little of the man and the professional triumphs and personal tragedies he faced, this book will be a great introduction

Dr. W. Andrew Hoffecker describes the life and influence of Charles Hodge, one of the giants of American Presbyterianism.

Hoffecker has written a fantastic biography titled Charles Hodge: Pride of Princeton, which has been published by Presbyterian and Reformed Publishing. Dr. Hoffecker has written a fantastic biography titled Charles Hodge: Pride of Princeton, which has been published by Presbyterian and Reformed Publishing. Participants: Camden Bucey, Jim Cassidy, Mark Garcia, W. Christ the Center focuses on Reformed Christian theology.

Charles Hodge (December 27, 1797 – June 19, 1878) was a Presbyterian theologian and principal of Princeton Theological Seminary between 1851 and 1878

Charles Hodge (December 27, 1797 – June 19, 1878) was a Presbyterian theologian and principal of Princeton Theological Seminary between 1851 and 1878. He was a leading exponent of the Princeton Theology, an orthodox Calvinist theological tradition in America during the 19th century. He argued strongly for the authority of the Bible as the Word of God. Many of his ideas were adopted in the 20th century by Fundamentalists and Evangelicals.

Charles Hodge (1797–1878) is regarded by many as the most significant American theologian of the nineteenth .

Charles Hodge (1797–1878) is regarded by many as the most significant American theologian of the nineteenth century. His advocacy of a Reformed orthodoxy combined with evangelical piety attracted a broad following within Old School Presbyterianism that spilled over into American evangelicalism as a whole. Hodge helped to define a distinctive ministerial model-the pastor-scholar-and his fingerprints can be seen all over the Reformed Christian scene of today.

The Pride of Princeton. A many-sided theologian demands a many-sided biography, which is exactly what Andrew Hoffecker has provided in this careful, balanced, discerning, and insightful book. Andy Hoffecker sets the record straight. A winsome portrait of a theologian who still deserves to be taken with utmost seriousness. I could not put Hoffecker's book down. It clearly and vividly presents Hodge's theology and his story.

Charles Hodge: The Pride of Princeton (American Reformed Biographies)

Charles Hodge: The Pride of Princeton (American Reformed Biographies). Reformed Theological Seminary Reformed Theology Westminster Confession Christian Devotions Biographies. Related Media Listen to an episode of Christ the Center with Dr. Andrew Hoffecker entitled Charles Hodge: The Pride of Princeton. Publisher's DescriptionCharles Hodge (1797-1878) is regarded by many as the most significant American theologian of the nineteenth century.

Charles Hodge (1797-1878) is regarded by many as the most significant American theologian of the nineteenth century. He drove forward the rapid growth of theological education and contributed to Presbyterianism’s wide-ranging influence in public life. His advocacy of a Reformed orthodoxy combined with evangelical piety attracted a broad following within Old School Presbyterianism that spilled over into American evangelicalism as a whole. Hodge helped to define a distinctive ministerial model—the pastor-scholar—and his fingerprints can be observed all over the Reformed Christian scene today.

Forey
I found Dr. Hoffecker's book very contagious; the more I read the greater my desire to read further. The author took Charles Hodge's vast amount of writings and condensed them into an orderly, systematic biography which gave background information which enlightened Hodge's reasons, methods and goals for writing as he did. For me, I especially benefited from the sections on Hodge's two year European studies, especially in Germany. These sections gave me a much greater appreciation of the flow of theological teaching as influenced by concurrent philosophies present in Europe. This benefit was further re-enforced in the account of Hodge's writings in defense of orthodoxy against these new European philosophical theologies and how these new teachings eventually spread to America.
Dr. Hoffecker placed short preview summaries before major sections and a short summary paragraph at the end of these sections. This allowed almost anyone to follow the flow of the chapter, even if their knowledge of history of American Presbyterianism was scant. It is not possible to include every detail in a biography but Charles Hodge, the Pride of Princeton certainly gives enough for one to see that Hodge was a genuine professor of theology during a time of great change.
Rias
Charles Hodge trained more than 5,000 ministers in his decades as professor of systematic theology at Princeton Seminary. His book, Systematic Theology (3 Volumes), has been in print from 1873 until now. He defended a theology of radical human depravity and the equally radical redemptive grace of Augustinian (Calvinistic) Christianity.

Dr. Hoffecker is a great admirer of all things Princeton. He intrigues the reader with Hodge's interest in the state of American churches, the world of revivalism, and a theologian's wrestling with the scientific learning of his time. Hodge defended Calvinistic orthodoxy and the inspiration of Holy Scripture. He stood against his own Presbyterian Church when it waded into partisan politics. You will not find a more interesting account of this very human, great believer.

Dr. Andrew Hoffecker writes with great affection for Hodge, with the good judgment of a seasoned historian. Anyone interested in 19th century America, Presbyterian history, church and state, or Calvinism will learn much from Dr. Hoffecker's book. I hope that many will read Charles Hodge in response!
Nicanagy
Hoffecker portrait was helpful in giving some interesting arguments on Hodge's upbringing and early influences. It seemed a bit one-dimensional, however, to suggest that these early influences were so dominant later in life. It almost became a bit of refrain to find in every chapter or every other chapter another reference to why Hodge was both Old and New School in some senses.

My biggest disappointment was that I felt like Charles Hodge was presented more as a churchman and a fighter than a theologian, professor, and developer of pastors (which was at the heart of all that I've read on Old Princeton previously). Also, I had hoped to see more primary source material that would get to the heart of Hodge's primary motivations at staying on at Old Princeton.

In the end, I think Hoffecker's interest was more about Hodge the Presbyterian Churchman, than the pride of Princeton.
Swiang
Dr. Hodge was a brilliant Bible scholar and to be fully trusted. This biography gets into such hair splitting detail at times that it gets bogged down. The parts I liked the best were anecdotes about him at home, in school and things he did outside the classroom. It seems to have been written toward those who knew of Princeton Seminary and it was a bit dry because of that. It was well researched and well written but didn't grab me .
Stick
A very easy, sympathetic read on a pivotal nineteenth century American theologian. This introduces the man behind the three-volume Systematic Theology.
Chilele
Who says reviews don't matter? "I could not put Hoffecker's book down." Seven simple words uttered by Dr. John Frame prompted me to pick up Charles Hodge: The Pride of Princeton by W. Andrew Hoffecker. The author makes a solid contribution in P & R's American Reformed Biographies Series.

I first encountered Charles Hodge in Seminary. His piece on the decrees of God made an indelible imprint on my mind and has influenced my thinking since those early days. Hoffecker's work puts skin on the bones that I was confronted with in my Seminary days. Here we find a man of courage and a man of deep conviction. Charles Hodge was a man willing to put his neck on the line and battle for truth. He laid the groundwork for men who would follow and continue to fight on the theological battlefield; men like B.B. Warfield and Gresham Machen.

A few highlights worth mentioning include Hodges' faithful fight against liberalism. Like today, the liberalism of the 19th century was popular and would influence young minds if left unchallenged. Hodge was not content to sit by idly. He boldly confronted the pernicious error of 19th century liberalism (which oddly enough is seeking to permeate the church once again - primarily through many emergent sympathizers).

The second highlight is Hodges' unwavering commitment to Reformed theology. Call him a guardian, a defender, an apologist - or just a diehard Reformed theologian. Hodge may have been willing to sacrifice certain negotiable doctrinal points. But he drew the line in the sand when it came to the doctrines of grace.

Charles Hodge is a model of teaching excellence. He is a worthy example of what it means to stand for the truth in a dark world. Young pastors and seasoned pastors alike would do well to emulate the courage and conviction of the Pride of Princeton - Charles Hodge.