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by Charles Bracelen Flood
Download Grant and Sherman: The Friendship that Won the Civil War fb2
Leaders & Notable People
  • Author:
    Charles Bracelen Flood
  • ISBN:
    0060857412
  • ISBN13:
    978-0060857417
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    HarperAudio; Abridged edition (September 27, 2005)
  • Subcategory:
    Leaders & Notable People
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1289 kb
  • ePUB format
    1264 kb
  • DJVU format
    1318 kb
  • Rating:
    4.7
  • Votes:
    595
  • Formats:
    txt lrf azw mbr


Grant and Sherman - Charles Bracelen Flood

Grant and Sherman - Charles Bracelen Flood. That was Grant as he lived in Galena on the eve of the Civil War-an ordinary-looking man of thirty-eight, five feet eight inches tall and weighing 135 pounds, somewhat stooped and with a short brown beard, a quiet man who smoked a pipe and by then had some false teeth. He had never wanted a military career: he went to West Point only because his autocratic father, who had gotten him a congressional appointment to the academy without consulting him, insisted that he go.

Charles Bracelen Flood. In many battles, commanders lose some measure of their control of the situation, but at Chattanooga, this happened frequently

Charles Bracelen Flood. In many battles, commanders lose some measure of their control of the situation, but at Chattanooga, this happened frequently. and people looking at the same actions on the same terrain said they saw different things. At a crucial point, Grant indecisively delayed a major attack.

10 - grant and sherman begin to develop the winning strategy. Grant and Sherman learned the lessons that led to the final victory during many desperate hours in dramatic campaigns. 11 - sherman saves lincoln’s presidential campaign. 12 - professional judgment and personal friendship: savannah for christmas.

After Shiloh, Flood describes how the Grant-Sherman relationship continued to grow through the Chattanooga campaign in 1863 . Citation: William B. Feis.

After Shiloh, Flood describes how the Grant-Sherman relationship continued to grow through the Chattanooga campaign in 1863 and how, by 1864, when Grant left the West for Virginia, the two men had forged such a powerful bond that they could now operate with one mind hundreds of miles apart. The prelude to their unbelievable success in the final year of the war was their meeting in Cincinnati in March 1864.

Grant and Sherman book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Grant and Sherman: The Friendship That Won the Civil War as Want to Read: Want to Read saving. Start by marking Grant and Sherman: The Friendship That Won the Civil War as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Charles Bracelen Flood has attempted to explore this unique. عاينة المستخدمين - wrjensen382 - LibraryThing. Very interesting description of the friendship between Grant and Sherman during the Civil War, and their key roles in winning the war. Also covered are their common backgrounds as West Point graduates.

Mobile version (beta). Grant and Sherman: The Friendship That Won the Civil War. Charles Bracelen Flood. Download (epub, . 1 Mb). FB2 PDF MOBI TXT RTF. Converted file can differ from the original. If possible, download the file in its original format.

Owning a rather extensive Civil War library, I tend to approach Civil War books with a certain skepticism; it's very .

Owning a rather extensive Civil War library, I tend to approach Civil War books with a certain skepticism; it's very difficult at this point for a book to avoid repeating historical information, and even emotional effects, that are already covered extensively in my collection. This audio book consists of 5 CD's with a total play time of approximately 6 hours.

Flood also gives wonderful glimpses of the touching lifelong romance between Grant and his beloved Julia

Flood also gives wonderful glimpses of the touching lifelong romance between Grant and his beloved Julia. The story of her failure to get a surgical correction for her mis-aligned eyes, and of Grant's declaration of his love for her precisely as she was, will move all but the most callous readers. At the same time, Flood doesn't shy away from the ugly sides of Grant or Sherman.

Authors: Charles Bracelen Flood. Grant and Sherman’s Western Theater of War 1861-1863. As soon as real war begins, new men, heretofore unheard of, will emerge from obscurity, equal to any occasion. William Tecumseh Sherman, six weeks before Bull Run. I knew wherever I was that you thought of me, and if I got in a tight place you would come if alive. Sherman to Grant, March 10, 1864, summing up their successful Western campaigns. But what next? I suppose it will be safe if I leave General Grant and yourself to decide.

"We were as brothers," William Tecumseh Sherman said, describing his relationship with Ulysses S. Grant. They were incontestably two of the most important figures in the Civil War, but until now there has been no book about their victorious partnership and the deep friendship that made it possible.

Heeding the call to save the Union, each struggled past political hurdles to join the war effort. Taking each other's measure at the Battle of Shiloh, they began their unique collaboration. Often together under fire on the war's great battlefields, they shared the demands of family life, the heartache of loss, and supported each other in the face of mudslinging by the press and politicians. Their growing mutual admiration and trust set the stage for the crucial final year of the war and the peace that would follow.

Moving and elegantly written, Grant and Sherman is a historical page-turner: a gripping portrait of two men whose friendship, forged on the battlefield, would win the Civil War.


Munimand
Absolutely wonderful book. I am nearly 70 and am well read. This book was just wonderful and gave me a full history to the Civil War.

I had ancestors that were in the war for the north, a doctor and a soldier. They were from Pittsburgh. And I have many letters of that time about the "rebels" raids on Pittsburgh. If you have any interest in history you will love this book. Grant and Sherman were the most interesting people and this author brings them alive. I am a woman and never read about battles, but this was my first such book. I was riveted.

Had no idea that most of the generals were class mates at West Point on both sides. Read this book and you will be so glad you did.
Tenius
This would be one of the best books I have read. It amazes me that it hasn't been turned into a film or documentary. Their lives seemed to have contained everything the human experience could be involved in. It includes the struggle of everyday living, war, romance and intrigue just to mention a few things going on in their lives. These two men so much the same yet so different. I have read a few books about Grant and Sherman portrayed separately, most have been enjoyable. Floods narrative kept me interested from start to finish.... I can't wait for the movie.
Broadcaster
This is a story no one ever tells when you read about the Civil War. You read about General Grant and his mission out west and then you read about Sherman and his march to the sea. But the two are never put into context, that they worked together to close out the two separate theatres that were most active in the South. Grant took on Robert E. Lee and Sherman took on Joe Johnston. This strategy made certain that these two Confederate armies wouldn't be able to join together.

They made this plan under the guidance of Abraham Lincoln, who fully supported these two generals who were fighting to save the Union. Indeed, they were quite complicated men with slightly varying philosophies, yet each brought out the best in the other. They became very good friends and the friendship lasted their lifetime.

Absolutely fascinating and very well sourced from primary sources of the time, as well as from letters each wrote. I couldn't put it down.
Rude
Owning a rather extensive Civil War library, I tend to approach Civil War books with a certain skepticism; it's very difficult at this point for a book to avoid repeating historical information, and even emotional effects, that are already covered extensively in my collection.

But this latest by Charles Flood is a gem. The author has an exceptionally rare narrative gift. If you haven't read of these events before, you'll be in excellent hands discovering them here. And even if you have several times over, you'll find them delivered in a fresh and powerful way.

This book starts out as something like a dual biography, of Ulysses Grant and William Sherman. After fate brings these two men together, the narrative shifts to being about their relationship, about how each detected and reinforced the best qualities in the other, and how indispensable these two men together were to preventing the dissolution of the Union.

Flood presents many scenes that enable the reader to take the measure of Grant. Towards the beginning of the book he tells an oft-recounted story of Grant's laconic determination to persevere after a disastrous day at the battle of Shiloh, and what an impression this made on Sherman. (I'd re-tell it here, but it's much better in Flood's hands.)

Flood also gives wonderful glimpses of the touching lifelong romance between Grant and his beloved Julia. The story of her failure to get a surgical correction for her mis-aligned eyes, and of Grant's declaration of his love for her precisely as she was, will move all but the most callous readers.

At the same time, Flood doesn't shy away from the ugly sides of Grant or Sherman. Marvelously admirable though they are in most respects, they voice expressions of both racist and anti-semitic attitudes that must make the modern reader cringe.

Flood does a splendid job late in the book of detailing some delicate maneuvers in which Grant engaged, in order to rescue Sherman from some political difficulties others had created for him, and which Sherman's own irascible temperament had exacerbated.

The story of the death of Sherman's son, of the love the boy had inspired among the Federal troops, and the touching letter that Sherman wrote to those troops, who had made the late son an honorary officer, is also told with grace and eloquence.

So, too, are a few passages about Robert E. Lee. The moving surrender scene between Lee and Grant is encapsulated here, but there are also more obscure, but equally affecting, ones. One involves Lee's compassionate response, during the retreat from Gettysburg, to the taunts of a wounded Federal soldier.

The book works, in the end, because it's a can't miss story. You have two men, an odd couple, facing up to the most momentous challenge imaginable. You also have the appeal of their surprising and sudden ascents from seemingly failed lives -- inspiring enough with one such man, but present here with two. And you have the unfolding of a relationship of touching loyalty, in a world otherwise filled with intrigue. In a certain way, even these two fierce warriors were too good for their times, and the nation benefited.

But good as the material is, it's the treatment by the author that makes it a surpassing book. I flew through it without intending to. It's simply an irresistible read.

Highest recommendation.
Just_paw
The following comments are for the abridged CD audio book version of "Grant and Sherman The Friendship That Won The Civil War" by Charles Bracelen Flood and narrated by the author. Harper Audio Book copyright 2005.

This audio book consists of 5 CD's with a total play time of approximately 6 hours. Each CD is indexed into numbered tracks of approximately 10 minuets lengths. The audio quality is uniformly excellent. This listener found the author narrator a good speaker whose clear pronunciation and moderate pacing adequate to listen too. I have listed to quite a few audio books and it is very infrequent when an author reads his own works. I would of preferred a "professional reader" but that is just a personal preference from this listener.

From their humble origins it is difficult to imaging that Grant and Sherman would achieve General rank let alone lead the North to victory. Flood spends considerable time informing us of the pre war years of these two individuals. I particularly enjoyed the story about Grant, who after resigning his commission because of drunkenness and reduced to selling firewood door to door in order to support his family is approached by a General officer he knew. "Good God, Grant what are you doing", Grant replies, "I'm trying to solve the riddle of poverty".

The abridged story of these two Civil War Generals makes for an excellent companion on those long car trips or walks on the treadmill. You may, like this reviewer, want to read the book without abridgements.