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by Stephen L. Harris
Download Harlem's Hell Fighters: The African-American 369th Infantry in World War I fb2
Leaders & Notable People
  • Author:
    Stephen L. Harris
  • ISBN:
    1574883860
  • ISBN13:
    978-1574883862
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Potomac Books Inc.; 1 edition (June 2003)
  • Pages:
    356 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Leaders & Notable People
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1641 kb
  • ePUB format
    1595 kb
  • DJVU format
    1183 kb
  • Rating:
    4.6
  • Votes:
    664
  • Formats:
    mbr rtf lrf lit


When the United States entered World War I in 1917, thousands of African-American men volunteered to fight for a. .Francis Duffy, Wild Bill Donovan, and the Irish Fighting 69th in World War I (Potomac Books, 2006). He lives in Weybridge, Vermont.

When the United States entered World War I in 1917, thousands of African-American men volunteered to fight for a country that granted them only limited civil rights. Many from New York City joined the 15th .

In America’s segregated military, the men of the 369th Infantry had to overcome many hurdles before they proved themselves on the battlefield. Led by mostly inexperienced white and black officers, they not only received little instruction at their training camp in South Carolina but were frequent victims of racial harassment, from both civilians and their white comrades. Named one of the best books on America's participation in the Great War by the World War One Historical Association, Duffy’s War captures the story of brave New Yorkers through letters and diaries, some never seen before. Infantry, a National Guard regiment later designated the 369th . Led by mostly inexperienced white and black officers, these men not only received little instruction at their training camp in South Carolina but were frequent victims of racial harassment from both civilians and their white comrades.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 289-293) and index

Includes bibliographical references (p. 289-293) and index. Strength of the nation - We have the regiment - Pancho Villa rides to the rescue - The color line will not be drawn in this regiment - Man who stood for something - The honor of the state - I will startle the world - Black is not a color of the rainbow -. Color, blood, and suffering have made us one - The man has kicked us right to France - Landed at Brest, right side up! -. - This pick and shovel work - Ragtime in France - God damn, let's go! -. - He can go some! -. - I wish I had a brigade, yes, a division - There.

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The 369th Infantry began as the 15th New York Infantry Regiment, and its original members always preferred this National . Harris tells this story and more in Harlem's Hell Fighters.

The 369th Infantry began as the 15th New York Infantry Regiment, and its original members always preferred this National Guard designation over the one it received after having been mustered into federal service during the First World War and sent to France. By receiving a designation in the 300s, numbers usually reserved for draftees, the unit felt slighted by Washington. His decision to begin and end his book with concerts by the renowned jazz musician James Reese Europe reflects his effort to draw out some of the larger-than-life personalities who played an important role in the unit's history.

The 369th Infantry Regiment, formerly known as the 15th New York National Guard Regiment and commonly referred to as the Harlem Hellfighters, was an infantry regiment of the New York Army National Guard during World War I and World War II. The Regime. The Regiment consisted mainly of African Americans, though it also included several Puerto Rican Americans during World War II. With the 370th Infantry Regiment, it was known for being one of the first African American regiments to serve with the American.

First World War (content). HARRIS, STEPHEN L. (Author) Brassey's (Publisher). Production date Related content. 2003 Related content. First World War Recruitment Posters. How has war in the air changed over time? KS3-4.

When the United States entered World War I in 1917, thousands of African-American men volunteered to fight for a country that granted them only limited civil rights. Many from New York City joined the 15th N.Y. Infantry, a National Guard regiment later designated the 369th U.S. Infantry. Led by mostly inexperienced white and black officers, these men not only received little instruction at their training camp in South Carolina but were frequent victims of racial harassment from both civilians and their white comrades. Once in France, they initially served as laborers, all while chafing to prove their worth as American soldiers.Then they got their chance. The 369th became one of the few U.S. units that American commanding general John J. Pershing agreed to let serve under French command. Donning French uniforms and taking up French rifles, the men of the 369th fought valiantly alongside French Moroccans and held one of the widest sectors on the Western Front. The entire regiment was awarded the Croix de Guerre, the French government’s highest military honor. Stephen L. Harris’s accounts of the valor of a number of individual soldiers make for exciting reading, especially that of Henry Johnson, who defended himself against an entire German squad with a large knife. After reading this book, you will know why the Germans feared the black men of the 369th and why the French called them “hell fighters.”

Voodoogore
There are few American fighting units that have generated as much admiration and myth--in almost equal measure--as the famed 369th U.S. Infantry. The men of one of the storied "colored regiments" that fought with valor in France, Harlem's Hell Fighters have entered the pantheon of African-American military heroes as peers of the Tuskegee Airman and the 54th Massachusetts. Stephen L. Harris has untangled the folklore from the facts in this definitive study. The good news is that the verifiable truth of the valorous service of these brave volunteers is every bit as compelling as fiction could aspire to be. In tight prose and with a storyteller's voice, Harris presents a vivid picture of men who, facing entrenched prejudice at home, head to France where bigotry follows them into the American Expeditionary Forces. When General Pershing fobs them off on the French, they distinguish themselves fighting alongside their exhausted allies and cover themselves with glory. This is a must-read volume for a wide range of readers, from those seeking inspirational nonfiction to serious students of the First World War. Steve Harris does a great service to the memory of these ordinary men who did truly extraordinary deeds.
Coiwield
What a fantastic bit of history. Hard to believe, 100 years feels almost like stepping into another world, a familiar one be it that. Towards the end, while the author did not specifically connect PTSD issues with returning troops from France, the evidence was hard to miss. As a veteran myself, there is some comfort knowing my generation is not alone, war, all war, leaves scars, some are visible while others are not. As for the book, Harris has put together a well researched and documented presentation on a seldom looked at era of history. I loved the connection of early jazz music and the organization the Harlem Hellfighters. I'm also glad to see American Experience have added their story to their Great War documentary. If you're a fan of history and want to learn something new, I totally recommended this book. No bent. No rhetoric. Just data, story, and documentation
Nanecele
A great book something that u don’t get from school. They Deserve a lot of gratitude . They fought for a Country that did not give them any respect. And when they maked it back home they were still treated like second-class citizens . I great book!!!!!!
Breder
OK book. Lots of time spent on activities before and after the war to flesh out the book a bit. However, there isn't enough history produced about our black American brothers and any insight into their day to day lives is to be cherished.
TheFresh
A reading that should be part of all military basic training. Know the history of the military!
Arthunter
Great Book, opened my eyes to some new history
Precious
I was excited to be able to find this book after looking for a long time, this is my famliy's history.Excellent read
Good book on a part of history that is over looked.