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by Merle Feld
Download A Spiritual Life: A Jewish Feminist Journey (SUNY series in Modern Jewish Literature and Culture) fb2
Leaders & Notable People
  • Author:
    Merle Feld
  • ISBN:
    0791441180
  • ISBN13:
    978-0791441183
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    SUNY Press (March 2000)
  • Pages:
    274 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Leaders & Notable People
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1314 kb
  • ePUB format
    1591 kb
  • DJVU format
    1413 kb
  • Rating:
    4.6
  • Votes:
    472
  • Formats:
    lit docx mobi txt


Read Spiritual Life, A Jewish Feminist Journey- A must read! . An amazing story of self-discovery, " A Spiritual Life, A Jewish Feminist Journey" by Merle Feld, fills her book with beautiful prose and poetry.

Read Spiritual Life, A Jewish Feminist Journey- A must read! By Thriftbooks. com User, May 12, 2001. I identified with this book immensely as the author echoed my inner thoughts that I never took the time to write. Ms. Feld voices the struggle to grow and develop into a special person, concerns about doubts how woman relate to others, professional growth and motherhood.

Similar books to A Spiritual Life: Exploring the Heart and Jewish . After all, Feld is a feminist who doesn't throw off the realities of daily life, but ennobles them

After all, Feld is a feminist who doesn't throw off the realities of daily life, but ennobles them. God is in the details; for Feld, family responsibilities are more often the genesis than the nemesis of spiritual/emotional fulfillment.

Includes new and updated material, as well as a readers' guide with questions for writing and discussion groups.

A Spiritual Life: Exploring the Heart and Jewish Tradition (S U N Y Series in Modern Jewish Literature and Culture). Download (pdf, 723 Kb) Donate Read. Epub FB2 mobi txt RTF. Converted file can differ from the original. If possible, download the file in its original format.

Merle Feld's memoir, A Spiritual Life: A Jewish Feminist Journey was published on. .

Merle Feld's memoir, A Spiritual Life: A Jewish Feminist Journey was published on April 1, 1999. In the book, Feld combines poetry and prose to tell the story of her life from her childhood in an impoverished Brooklyn family to marriage and motherhood, involvement in Israeli-Palestinian peace work, and feminist activism. Merle Feld, poet and playwright, was born and raised in Crown Heights, Brooklyn, in an assimilated family.

Explores the complex facets of a Jewish woman's spiritual coming-of-age .

Explores the complex facets of a Jewish woman's spiritual coming-of-age, capturing the emotional and spiritual reality of contemporary Jews as well as religious seekers of all types. Feld believes strongly in the value of expressing yourself, discovering yourself through writing. A few years ago a Jewish magazine decided to devote an issue to spirituality and asked me to contribute a short piece describing "a spiritual moment.

SUNY Series in Modern Jewish Literature and Culture. Feld, Merle, 1947-;Jewish women United States Biography. Spiritual Life : Exploring the Heart and Jewish Tradition. Subjects: Feld, Merle, 1947-;Jewish women United States Biography. Jewish women Religious life United States. Feminism Religious aspects Judaism. Feminists United States Biography. Spiritual life Judaism. Jewish religious poetry, American. Women Remaking American Judaism. by: Prell, Riv-Ellen. Gender and Timebound Commandments in Judaism. by: Alexander, Elizabeth Shanks.

Jewish American literature holds an essential place in the literary history of the United States. While critics and authors generally acknowledge the notion of a distinctive corpus and practice of writing about Jewishness in America, many writers resist being pigeonholed as "Jewish voices

A Spiritual Life: A Jewish Feminist Journey - Merle Feld - Google Books. Modern Orthodox feminism, unlike its Conservative and nist counterparts, seeks to change the position of women from within Jewish law (halakha). Orthodox Jewish feminism.

A Spiritual Life: A Jewish Feminist Journey - Merle Feld - Google Books. "Jewish Women and the Feminist Revolution (Jewish Women's Archive)". These are signs of the beginnings of feminist movement in the haredi community in Israel.

Explores the complex facets of a Jewish woman's spiritual coming-of-age, capturing the emotional and spiritual reality of contemporary Jews as well as religious seekers of all types.

betelgeuze
My brother and I were at Sinai
He kept a journal
of what he saw
of what he heard
Of what it all meant to him
I wish I had such a record
of what happened to me there
It seems like every time I want to write
I can't
I'm always holding a baby
With these words, Merle Feld captures the central conflict of her for all Jewish women, at Sinai -- has been deeply felt, but only rarely recorded.
Feld sets out to close this ancient lacuna -- which has made women's spirituality the malnourished stepchild at the feast of Jewish learning -- with an inspirational account of her own inner life, from childhood in Brooklyn (assimilated) to adulthood as a sought-after poet, playwright and lecturer (flourishing alongside her husband, a rabbi whose spiritual journey enriches -- but cannot always parallel -- her own). This is a travelogue of Feld's years in the desert.
Feld tells the story largely through her poems (many previously unpublished, others re-collected from anthologies and journals). The poems are animated by their Bombeckian attention to the details of
Do you flush? When she's napping--
Do you flush?
No, I say to the voice on the other end of the phone.
We both laugh.
Another mother's secret shared.
The verse is about childrearing, but its subtext -- that women can survive only by comparing notes (neither Dr. Spock nor the Torah speaks to women as surely as it speaks of men) -- is central to Feld's project.
The book tracks her life in roughly chronological order -- childhood, marriage (to a rabbi who encouraged her search but, given the dearth of resources for Jewish women, could only guide her so far). Of their first Friday night together, in the shabby apartment
It was all so ugly that we turned out the lights
Only the shabbos candles flickered.
Shabbos candles become the weekly punctuation as she moves through childrearing, the struggle to find a voice (now loud-and-clear in several oft-performed plays), and personal tragedies, such as a miscarriage and the deaths of parents:
My fingers were cold this morning
hanging out the wash
but the warmth of the sun
reminded me of how I had planned
to sit in the sun with my mother.
Eventually, there is activism (in Israel and at home), and finally, the creation of a community of Jewish feminists, whose journeys inform Feld's own, and tantalize with the possibility that hers may be the first in a series of intertwined memoirs. The book suggests that the spiritual journey follows a long and winding road, but that answers are found along the way -- and that uncertainty is no reason to postpone the trip.
Feld's great gift is for linking feelings about being a wife/mother/sister/friend/lover, and feelings about being a Jew. Thus, discovering the depths of her Zionism during a year in Israel, she
Jerusalem
I write your name
as long ago I wrote the names
of boys who made me flush
with inexplicable pleasure
Feld's prose can be as lovely as her poetry. Take this description, from her chapter on the cycle of the Jewish year, of effort required go; the refrigerator, the stove, must gleam, even cleaner than for snoopy in-laws, even cleaner than for resale--clean enough for God."
I am reminded of Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick's deceptively simple deliberate decision about where the lines will end." (Neither poetry nor prose, as Sedgwick implies and Feld confirms, has a monopoly on rhythm, dead-on imagery, or powerful emotional effect.)
This eminently readable book suffers none of the shortcomings of other spiritual memoirs (pomposity; certitude; caricaturing doubt as an enemy easily vanquished in time for the last chapter). It is a perfect gift for any spiritually-wandering Jew.
Feld, who is also the author of a cookbook, would almost certainly be pleased to see this memoir take its place on the kitchen windowsill (to be explored while waiting for toaster to pop or teakettle to whistle). After all, Feld is a feminist who doesn't throw off the realities of daily life, but ennobles them. (God is in the details; for Feld, family responsibilities are more often the genesis than the nemesis of spiritual/emotional fulfillment.)
In a time when superficiality is in fashion -- Alfred E. Neuman's "What Me Worry?" is as deep a philosophy as many Americans seem willing to adopt -- Feld's book is a "Let's Go" for the soul. The trip from Sinai will be long and difficult, she tells us -- but less difficult for those who takes notes (and share them, as Feld has done compellingly) along the way
from earth
This book written by Merle Feld was extremely good. I couldn't put it down. Merle takes us on a journey through her early days as a child with lovely poems to enhance our reading and onto her married years where she explores the many areas of women in Judiasm. It is a true story of her journey which I truley enjoyed.
Aurizar
I wrote this letter to Ms. Feld while reading A Spiritual Life.
Hi Merle,
I'm not generally a big fan of poetry. But your poems have touched so many different parts of my life. Standing At Sinai has been part of my life and my Rosh Chodesh group on several occasions. We had one mother-daughter meeting where we all invited our mothers, and we brought Standing at Sinai to discuss. Adding our mother's varied opinions to our on-going discussion was amazing. I have given Mazel Tov to more brides than I can count, and I'm now reading your book slowly, savoring it in quiet moments I can grab. Last Shabbat, I finally made it to the poetry section, two days before the bris of a friend who went through a miscarriage before this baby. After Shabbat, I e-mailed her My Friends Baked... so she could read it before the bris. This Shabbat, my rosh chodesh group had our annual Shabbat dinner, and I brought your book. As my friend who had a miscarriage and now has an 8 month old daughter read, she kept exclaiming how true each of the poems struck her. You touch people.
I was like a kid in a candy store when I received your book, jumping around reading parts to my husband and searching for poems I already love, falling in love with new poems. So I just want to thank you for your poems, and now the book. Your path is a path I travel, and its wonderful to see the beauty of things before I get there.
Be well.
B'Shalom,
Max
Ice_One_Guys
An amazing story of self-discovery, " A Spiritual Life, A Jewish Feminist Journey" by Merle Feld, fills her book with beautiful prose and poetry. I identified with this book immensely as the author echoed my inner thoughts that I never took the time to write. Ms. Feld voices the struggle to grow and develop into a special person, concerns about doubts how woman relate to others, professional growth and motherhood. She discovers a gift with words and poetry and along the way - confidence. Her book, a triumph of realization and actualization, expresses her developing passion, hones social action and true friendships. Read this book from cover to cover or open the book and select a poem at random. Each poem allows an opportunity to remember who we are, engage in a dialogue with self and friends, to encourage where we need to be in our lives. Several favorite passages discuss marriage, Israel, re- interpretation of some biblical stories, Shabbat and agonies about menstruation. This book will make you a new friend. Excellent!
doesnt Do You
Merle's Feld's poetry is so down to earth and fun to read as to appear simple--and nothing can be further from the truth. Her beautiful and touching poems are little jewels, each reflecting her deep connection to Judaism as well as her own humorous and profound insights into life as a Jewish woman. Through her poems and the personal narrative story that she weaves around them, Merle shares her experiences and journey as a Jewish feminist, mother, daughter, American in Israel, and wife.
This book will speak to anyone, regardless of gender or background, who has ever felt that spirituality is in competition with the overwhelming demands of everyday life. Without offering formulas or prescriptions, Merle's voice speaks to a part of myself that I struggle to find; it says that holiness can be found right in the midst of the most mundane tasks and minutae. It is a transcendent experience in itself to realize that we have the power to transform everyday life into something holy.