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by Bruce C. Hafen
Download A Disciple's Life: The Biography of Neal A. Maxwell fb2
Leaders & Notable People
  • Author:
    Bruce C. Hafen
  • ISBN:
    1570088330
  • ISBN13:
    978-1570088339
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Deseret Book Co; First Edition edition (April 1, 2002)
  • Pages:
    631 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Leaders & Notable People
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1865 kb
  • ePUB format
    1532 kb
  • DJVU format
    1947 kb
  • Rating:
    4.2
  • Votes:
    854
  • Formats:
    mbr txt lrf docx


Two of his books won the year's best book award from Deseret Book-The Broken Heart in 1989 and A Disciple's Life: The Biography of Neal A. Maxwell in 2002.

Two of his books won the year's best book award from Deseret Book-The Broken Heart in 1989 and A Disciple's Life: The Biography of Neal A. At an Evergreen International conference in 2009, Hafen urged LDS Church leaders and members to reach out in love to those with same-gender attraction. On October 2, 2010, Hafen was released from the First Quorum of the Seventy and designated an emeritus general authority. He served as president of the St. George Utah Temple from 2010 to 2013. Hafen and his wife, Marie, are the parents of seven children.

A Disciple's Life book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking A Disciple's Life: The Biography of Neal A. Maxwell as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Readers can decide whether Bruce Hafen's biography matches Neal Maxwell's own standards: "We must be. .I've been a fan of Neal Maxwell for many years, but never knew much about his life so I found this book to be very interesting and also very informative.

Readers can decide whether Bruce Hafen's biography matches Neal Maxwell's own standards: "We must be careful. not to canonize models as we have some pioneers and past Church leaders not to dry all the human sweat off them, not to put ceaseless smiles on their faces, when they really struggled and experienced agony. It provides a real incentive to go back and read his books and watch his conference talks again.

A Disciple's Life: The Biography of Neal A. Maxwell. Select a Store Gilbert Mesa Ensign Books - La Jolla Ensign Books - Redlands Ensign Books - Upland Far West Books - Fresno Orange County Sacramento Denver Temple Latter-Day Books & Gifts - Fort Collins Liahona LDS Books - Orlando Ammon Boise Idaho Falls Pocatello Rexburg Twin Falls This Is The Place - Kensington Fountain Books - Reno Las Vegas Lake Oswego Nephi's Books - Columbia Dallas LDS Books Latter-Day.

Compassionate, witty, politically astute, and spiritually authentic, Neal Maxwell has always been passionately engaged in life's battles.

Author Bruce C. Hafen. I thought a book on his life story would be wonderful until he asked if I would write it. Categories: Biography. In 1996, I was called to the Seventy and assigned to an Area Presidency in Australia, where I would remain until returning to Utah in August 2000. Like so many other Church members, my wife, Marie, and I were stunned by the news of Elder Maxwell's leukemia in late 1996, and we worried and prayed about his health. During October conference 1999, he invited me to come by his office. As we talked, he was quite uncertain about his condition. He was receiving an experimental treatment, but "one of these days,"he said, he fully expected the leukemia to return.

Elder Bruce C. Hafen said Elder Neal A. Maxwell serves as model to anyone seeking to be a true disciple of Jesus Christ. The book is not only a piece of Church history but also a guide to becoming a disciple of Christ. Elder Hafen said suffering can be personally sanctifying

Elder Bruce C. Elder Hafen said suffering can be personally sanctifying. The very act of choosing to be a discipl. an bring to us a certain special suffering. Elder Neal A. Maxwell of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles.

A Disciple's Journey Bruce C. Two of his books won the year’s best book award from Deseret Book-The Broken Heart in 1989 and A Disciple’s Life: The Biography of Neal A. Marriage, Family Law, and the Temple Bruce C. BYU Easter Conference 2019 - Bruce C Hafen. Love is Not Blind - Bruce Hafen. Sperry Symposium 2014 - Bruce C. At an Evergreen International conference in 2009, Hafen urged LDS Church leaders and members to reach out in love to those with unwanted same-gender attraction.

Bruce Clark Hafen is an American attorney, academic and religious leader. Two of his books won the year’s best book award from Deseret Book - The Broken Heart in 1989 and A Disciple’s Life: The Biography of Neal A. Maxwell in 2002

Bruce Clark Hafen is an American attorney, academic and religious leader. He has been a general authority of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints since 1996.

Compassionate, witty, politically astute, and spiritually authentic, Neal Maxwell has always been passionately engaged in life's battles. This instinct for action impelled him into the infantry in World War II where, on Okinawa, shaking and crying in a foxhole full of mud and foul water, he pledged his life to the Lord and was miraculously spared. An Apostle since 1981, Elder Maxwell has engaged a broader struggle, that between the sacred and the secular, the tension between faith and reason, and finally his greatest cause his spiritual ministry. His eloquent defense of Christianity and his brilliant reconciliation of faith and intellect are a rich legacy. But beyond that, he has shown that with the Savior's help, ordinary people can be better, less competitive, more loving, and receive the soul-transforming gift of charity. In this inspiring, sometimes humorous, and moving biography, Elder Bruce C. Hafen has painted an intimate portrait of a beloved Apostle, capturing the warm, personal stories that reveal the heart and mind of a true disciple of Christ.

Bloodray
Neal Maxwell was a leader in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints. This biography was written with the cooperation of Maxwell, his family, and his fellow church leaders. It begins with sketches of his parents' lives and finishes near the ending of his own life. Although it includes Maxwell's ideas about suffering, discipleship, and the use of language, it does not deal extensively with philosophical and ecclesiastical matters explored in his own numerous publications. It is the story of his life.

Maxwell's parents provided regular exposure to religious ideas, writings, and leaders. Young Neal did not always have a taste for church meetings, however--a weakness he overcame. From military service in the Pacific during World War II, he learned to find strength from prayer and to lead older and more experienced soldiers. His leadership development continued into his Canadian missionary years. We also learn about his marriage and experiences as a college student. One theme emerged in his studies that would remain strong throughout his career--the thoughtful integration of "sacred and secular" perspectives.

After college graduation, Maxwell worked as a senator's aide and contemplated a career in the nation's capitol. But his strong identity as a "Utah man" convinced him to return to his home state. Maxwell then worked at the University of Utah, as Dean of Students and as a university vice president. He then made the shift to the white shirt and tie culture of the LDS Church, holding positions such as Commissioner of the Church Education System. Building upon his experience as a church employee, Neal Maxwell was called to become one of the General Authorities of the Church. Since then his distinctive styles of writing and speech--particularly his playful and periodically painful alliterations--have become widely known.

This biography includes inspiring achievements, glimpses of church leaders' personalities, and amusing anecdotes. Everything pretty much expected from a biography one church leader writes about another. To the author's--and subject's--credit, it also candidly addresses some personal faults. By many accounts Maxwell's intelligence was coupled with an impatience for those who thought or acted more sedately. His preference for structured dinner discussions wasn't to everyone's liking--causing one friend to ask why he couldn't just let his guests enjoy spontaneous conversation. And his love of language sometimes became obsessive, as he spent hours crafting the ideal phrase for an article or talk.

Hafen also captures the good-natured meekness of a man who recognized his faults, strove mightily to conquer them, and laughed about his imperfections. Hafen notes of his writing: "Stylistically, he has gradually tamed the ornamentation that some of his friends once thought was simply too much." Maxwell himself is more direct about all-too-frequent alliterations: "I'm down to two packs a day."

The book is worth reading for its perspective on the life and career of a man determined to learn hard lessons and use this experience to serve others. There are also instructive accounts of how LDS general authorities seek inspiration and consensus, share responsibilities and burdens, and mentor less experienced colleagues. Readers can decide whether Bruce Hafen's biography matches Neal Maxwell's own standards: "We must be careful . . . not to canonize [our role] models as we have some pioneers and past Church leaders not to dry all the human sweat off them, not to put ceaseless smiles on their faces, when they really struggled and experienced agony."
Anazan
Neil Maxwell is among the most influential intellectuals of the Church of Jesus Christ (Mormon)of the 20th Century. J. Reuben Clark, Hugh Nibley, Bruce R. McConkie, and Joseph Fielding Smith all had great influence and all wrote many books but Maxwell's influence continues to expand.
The author (Hafen) is himself a high Mormon authority so reader's shouldn't expect a lot of criticism. However, Hafen did include what others thought of Maxwell and some of this included criticism of subjects from Elder Maxwell's personal style to his love of alliteration and lots of big words. Overall, this book is not a fulsome litany of praise, but a balanced, serious, and scholarly summary of Maxwell's life.
My major criticism of the book was that it flowed more slowly than I would have liked. The recent biography of Nibley flowed more smoothly and made the reader able to concentrate more on the subject matter than the manner of telling the story. I would also have like to see more about Maxwell's expectations for the future. Hafen documents the insight of Maxwell that was ahead of his time in so many areas.
What does that insight say about future challenges to the Church of Jesus Christ? What about English language and America being less of an influence in the church now that Spanish is the most common language of the Church and most Mormons now live outside the US? What about education in the future now that public schools no longer maintain "an acceptable moral and educational climate"?
However, these minor criticisms do not compare to the strengths of this book in detailing Maxwell's life and thoughts. There is plenty of meat in this book and I made a several page list of Maxwell quotes as I read this book. This book is so superior to books like the biography of J. Reuben Clark by an apostate historian who included lots of little digs at Clark in the name of "fairness" but completely missed the grandeur and depth of the subject.
Overall, the second best Mormon book I've read this year. (Nibley's biography would be first)
Endieyab
I've been a fan of Neal Maxwell for many years, but never knew much about his life so I found this book to be very interesting and also very informative. It provides a real incentive to go back and read his books and watch his conference talks again. Thank you Bruce Hagen for such a wonderful book!
Pettalo
This book is not only the biography of one of God's true Disciples in the latter-days, it is also the story of a successful son, husband, and father who loves to learn. The biography begins with the inspiring account of Neal's battle with cancer in the past five years, then backtracks to his days in the service and his experiences in Okinawa, to his beginning days in Washington D.C., and his administrative years at the University of Utah. Towards the conclusion of the book, the author mentions Neal's love of words and his remarkable writing ability. I am LDS (Mormon), but I recommend this book to everyone. Neal is truly a renaissance man and can be an inspiration to us all. He truly is a Disciple of Christ.
Walan
This biography is an excellent, thoughtful and sensitive tribute to a marvelous human being, father, university Dean, Commissioner of Church Education and Apostle of the Lord Jesus Christ. Thank you Elder Bruce Hafen and thank you Amazon...my world-wide shopping place. ;-)
Daigrel
very pleased.
Iaran
I read this book at the same time as a friend, and then we would discuss each chapter every other day. It was great. It kept my interest from day to day and strengthend my testimony of the way God prepares us for future events and callings. Elder Hafen writes very well. Elder Maxwell's life is worth studying regardless of who writes about him, so this book was a bonus!